Light leak repairs on Kodak folder bellows

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by smileyguy, Aug 24, 2006.

  1. smileyguy

    smileyguy Member

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    Basically the question is: When is a light leak a light leak?

    I am in the process of repairing the bellows on my Grandfather's Kodak Pocket Jr. 1A folder camera and found a method of patching the light leaks. Lots of little pin holes etc. throughout the bellows but wondering how I should be viewing the light leaks. If I look in the back of the opened camera towards the lens (from the film POV) I don't see any light leaks after patching. But when I move the camera around to different angles while I am looking at it I see other pin holes in the folds. Should I be worried about those as well even if they aren't visible from the plane of the film?

    The repairs are going generally well but every time I move the camera I see another one--ARRRGGGHHH! :mad:

    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Greg_E

    Greg_E Member

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    Put a light bulb inside the camera, and block off both ends. Now view the camera in a darkened room and look light spots.
     
  3. DBP

    DBP Member

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    Or if you want to do this in room light, fire a flash off inside.
     
  4. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    Charlie had the best tips on bellows repairs, perhaps he will see this thread and post to it. I don't remember what he used, but it was the best way to do it. tim
     
  5. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Subscriber

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    I use liquid black artist's acrylic paint for small pinholes. Instead of trying to identify every pinhole, I scrub the paint into all of the interior of the bellows with a soft toothbrush. Don't let thickness build up -- the intent is to just fill the holes.