Liquid emulsion

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Jarvman, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

    Messages:
    733
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Location:
    Cardiff, Uni
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I wouldn't mind trying something like this http://www.alternativephotography.com/artists/alexey_belov/ab_sunrise_in_the_forest.html

    I took a similar kind of photograph today with this print in mind, looking at silverprint but I can't find any liquid emulsion, they surely must have it though. What's it called, what's the best stuff to get? Also do you have any idea what this is printed on? I was thinking of buying cheapy canvases, what is the background coloured with?
     
  2. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,768
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Liquid Light is one product. Ilford made such a product. IDK if it is still made.

    Paper can be tinted with dilute pigments, dyes, coffee, tea and a whole host of materials. You can use just about any paper but if you want production grade DW FB Baryta, it is sold through the Formulary and is where I get mine.

    PE
     
  3. thebanana

    thebanana Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,650
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2004
    Location:
    Manitoba, Ca
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
  4. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,969
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    i have had great luck with liquid light
    i have never used it on paper
    only used on glass, and it worked
    well, once i learned how to "subb it"

    john
     
  5. rwyoung

    rwyoung Member

    Messages:
    704
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    www.freestylephoto.biz lists a few different liquid emulsions. The Maco stuff is supposed to be pretty good too. Item number 147 on the list of a zillion things to try!
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,030
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Try Silverprint, Martin sells Liquid Emulsions. Usually these are just commercial paper emulsions re-packaged, but exactly the same as used to coat conventional enlarger papers.

    Many years ago a UK company (Barfen) sold an Ilford emulsion, but this came from the Ilford's Nuclear Emulsions division.

    Ian
     
  7. mrtoml

    mrtoml Member

    Messages:
    548
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2005
    Location:
    Sheffield, U
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
  8. El Gringo

    El Gringo Subscriber

    Messages:
    147
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2006
    Location:
    Wales
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I was actually looking into liquid emulsions the other day with the intention of printing on cotton sheets and was looking at Silverprint's website. It took me a while but there is some on there, under alt-processes rather than the developers section.
     
  9. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,030
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Why would Liquid emulsions be listed in a Chemicals/Developer section, they aren't processing chemicals :D

    Ian
     
  10. RH Designs

    RH Designs Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    657
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2003
    Location:
    Yorkshire Da
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  11. Wishy

    Wishy Member

    Messages:
    189
    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Retro photographic also has this in stock (Adox Lux Liquid under chemicals)
     
  12. El Gringo

    El Gringo Subscriber

    Messages:
    147
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2006
    Location:
    Wales
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    My post made sense when I wrote it! Just goes to show that you shouldn't start answering questions until after you've had some caffeine :smile:
     
  13. Erik Hartmann

    Erik Hartmann Member

    Messages:
    250
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2006
    Location:
    Copenhagen
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 5, 2008
  14. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,969
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    i believe forumulte sold by the formulary is similar to (if not rebranded and the same as ) the maco/black cat.
    luminos used to also make some, wish they still did, it was the same relative asa as slow film ...

    john
     
  15. gandolfi

    gandolfi Member

    Messages:
    1,804
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Location:
    Denmark
    Shooter:
    Large Format Pan
    yes - that's the one!

    SO easy to use - one coating and you're there.
    make sure you use a brush without any metals on it (hake brushes).

    the 1 liters are on their way back, as far as I know.
    (unfortunately not the 5liters though)

    any question on this, just ask.

    (it is really easy to make your own emulsion also - if you stick to the simplest of recipies...)

    good luck - it is highly addictive!
     
  16. Silverhead

    Silverhead Member

    Messages:
    277
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    Shooter:
    Plastic Cameras
    Liquid Light is a good material to learn the craft on, as it's the least expensive--at least here in the States--mainly because it has the lowest silver content of any available liquid emulsion. Maco/Rollei's silver content is much higher, and Kentmere's (which used to be Silverprint IIRC) is the highest...and of course, its higher price reflects that. I would consider starting out with Liquid Light, and then once you've gotten yourself in the groove, graduate to the better stuff so you can crank out some really fine material.
     
  17. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,768
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You have analyses to show this silver difference? The reason I ask is that the same emulsion can give a different density depending on how it is made. It would be interesting to know if you have data to back up the 'silver content' because if you don't, I suspect that they might (MIGHT) be the same silver content just treated differently in the finishing operation.

    PE
     
  18. thefizz

    thefizz Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,130
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Location:
    Trim, Ireland
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Hi John, I have done liquid emulsion on timber and canvas but wanted to try it on glass. Any help you can provide on how you subbed your glass would be appreciated.

    Peter
     
  19. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,768
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You can sub glass with gelatin, or just coat the emulsion directly on the glass.

    The trick is to clean it well of all grease and oil, don't leave fingerprints, and harden with chrome alum.

    There are other comments and some photos of how this is done posted in the emulsion making and coating forum.

    Also, please be aware of the fact that all of these emulsions must be refrigerated, not frozen nor kept at room temperature, or they will not keep well. Also, every time you warm up the bottle to get some out, it changes slightly due to the heat cycle. That is why I store my emulsions in wide mouth containers and rather than re-heat them, I scoop out my sample with a spoon or a spatula.

    PE
     
  20. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,969
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    hi peter

    i have tried to put the emulsion right on the glass as ron mentions can be done
    but i have never had any luck doing it that way. :sad:
    i have used a few different subbing compounds, from varnish and clear polyurethane to gelatin.
    the varnish and urethane yellowed after a bit, but the gel never did.
    there are a bunch of different kinds of gelatins, and as ron says,
    you can use, photograde seems to work the best
    ( i use food grade which probably isn't good :smile: ) ..
    after the gelatin is coated and dried ( i do a few coats ) you can either
    flow the emulsion on the plate, or paint it. its fun, and not too hard.
    the hardest part is cleaning the glass, so water sheets off ( no dry spots ).

    there is a great article here:

    http://www.alternativephotography.com/process_dryplate.html

    good luck!

    john
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 6, 2008
  21. thefizz

    thefizz Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,130
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Location:
    Trim, Ireland
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Thanks John, I appreciate the info.
     
  22. spb854

    spb854 Member

    Messages:
    86
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Try this place

    www.porters.com

    They have a huge catalog.

    They CAN be overpriced at times, but they list a couple
    of liquid emulsions.

    Steve