Liquid Emulsions on Metal

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by laboheme17, Jan 3, 2010.

  1. laboheme17

    laboheme17 Member

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    So. I have this crazy urge to print some of my 35mm negatives on metal using Liquid Light. I have the hardening fixer and a few types of metal. Does anyone know what the best kind is to use? I found quite a bit of sheet copper that I really like, but have no idea how it will react in the D-76, stop bath, and fixer. Any ideas?
     
  2. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    Copper reacts to both strong alkalies and acids. I'd clean the copper and coat it with a couple of coats of a clear spray on finish before adding the liquid emulsion.
     
  3. Tomf2468

    Tomf2468 Member

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    Don't consider me a silver emulsion on metal expert..... I did some initial test and then decided the medium didn't match what I was try to make......

    Here is what I found. Steel (plain or stainless) and aluminum worked best for me. All the metals I tried needed a sealer/basecoat. The best I found was Cabot Semi-Gloss Polyurethane spray. Sold in the USA at Lowes big-box stores as a wood sealer. The Cabot glossy didn't work as well. Avoid Liquid Light for printing on metal (didn't adhere well), I had far far far better results with Kentmere Liquid B&W Emulsion (the single contrast version). Available from Freestyle in the USA. Avoid any of the (it sounds soooooo good) variable contrast emulsions, they were are radically flat and almost "fogged" looking on metal.

    Again, I didn't get far with this project because the reality of the process didn't match the vision in my head. I can see how with the right images it would be a great process. Bottom line, take what I've written here as suggestions... NOT as proven fact!
     
  4. DramaKing

    DramaKing Member

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    I don't have any chemical advice to offer, but I don't think it will give good results. You should use anything that is either white or transparent/translucent. The highlights will never be any brighter than the metal.
     
  5. Gwen_1981

    Gwen_1981 Member

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    PLEASE CAN YOU HELP ME!!!

    I HAVE TO do a work up of my reaction and whan ı come to the lab. ı realized that there was not any sodium bisulfate...
    what can ı use instead of sodium bi sulfate ı use it to neutralize4 the pyridine in my reaction media....
     
  6. Gwen_1981

    Gwen_1981 Member

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    hi... do you know what can ı use instead of sodium bisulfate to neutralize pyridine
     
  7. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Gwen;

    PYRADINE in a photographic medium? Hardly usual. Any strong acid, diluted enough can neutralize pyridine, but disposing of the mixture will be your problem. It is quite toxic. The vapors are not nice nor is the liquid itself which is a strong organic base and is quite corrosive. It is also reported to be a carcinogen and a mutagen so take care. In the 60s, there were reported cases of sterility in humans due to exposure.

    Neutralization will generate heat and fumes. Wear a mask, gloves, goggles and try to work in a hood to remove vapors.

    PE
     
  8. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    I spent years coating all sorts of surfaces with liquid emulsions commercially. Your suggestions are on the right lines, seal the metal surface, acrylic lacquers work best, give 2-3 good coats, dry for as long as possible at least a day minimum but 2-3 or more is better, then rub down with wet 1200 or 600 grit Wet & Dry paper to allow the emulsion to key on to the surface. Then coat.

    Ian