Liquid Light on Glass vs Perspects

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by HairyOx, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. HairyOx

    HairyOx Member

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    Hey, I've just been able to convince my art teacher to let my try out liquid light for my year 12 art piece. I thought I might leave there doing somthing worth wild and liquid light caught my attention 3 years ago when I started doing photography.

    Theres a whole bunch of things i want to try out with this piece, but mostly i just want to know about what other people use to get the best results out of liquid light when printing on glass/plastic perpects. I'm using it for its transparency, and also thinking about sepia toning with LL on the glass/perspecs. Has anyone done this befor? What problems have you encounterd that were unexpected?

    Ive read about subbing (from the rockford website) and albumen solution to make the image more permanent. What works the best to fix images to glass/plastic?

    Also about the contrast of the imagry, does anyone know which material will produce a better image? Is there any way to treat glass/perspects to improve this?

    If you could help with any one of these things, it would be fantastic. Thanks
    -Holly
     
  2. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    Check this thread to get some ideas. I haven't done any subbing myself so I can't give you any further hints.
     
  3. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    hi

    sounds like you are looking to have a little bit of fun :smile:
    you might -sub- your glass with clear gelatin. (you can get "photo grade/high bloom" from photographer's forumlary ... i just use supermarket-stuff and haven't had too much trouble )

    while this article is on making in-camera plates what you want to do is pretty much the same thing. the book mentioned at the end of the article is great - the bible for liquid emulsion users - if you can find it snatch it up :smile:

    there was an recipe i found lurking the internet, and while i never did this, it looked pretty easy ( sun prints too )

    http://www.apug.org/forums/article.php?a=132

    good luck!

    --john
     
  4. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    One thing is to make sure your glass is perfectly clean. After cleaning the glass breath on it. If you see streaks, it's still dirty.

    Avoid keeping it wet too long.

    Another thing is to try it on black glass.

    Good luck
     
  5. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    You should heat the glass plate gently and uniformly to about 100 deg F before adding any gelatin as a cold glass plate will thicken or set up the gelatin too quickly to spread well.

    PE