Loading color film using night vision goggles

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by mri_tech, Aug 27, 2007.

  1. mri_tech

    mri_tech Member

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    Greetings to all. I was wondering about the possibility of using night vision goggles as an aide for loading color film onto spools. I've read and heard you can do this with b&w, but could you do this with color since the color film is sensitive to all colors unlike the b&w film. Thanks for all the help and advice.

    Tom
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I believe you can. I believe they use IR goggles for film processing at Dwayne's. I'm not sure if that's on their website, or if I read it in an article on Dwayne's in the magazine _Super-8 Today_.
     
  3. MikeSeb

    MikeSeb Member

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    If you are talking about starlight scopes--these greatly amplify even the smallest amount of ambient light, like starlight--they probably wouldn't work in a darkroom for film that is totally dark.

    Others work by "seeing" in the IR spectrum, and that might do the job.
     
  4. tjaded

    tjaded Subscriber

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    You just need IR "goggles" and an IR light source. That's how we process all the color film at Newlab here in San Francisco (except for EIR of course!)
     
  5. mri_tech

    mri_tech Member

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    Night Vision goggles with color film

    Thanks for your input. I use a IR Viper night vision goggles. They work fine with black and white with no fog. I'll try them now with color. After reading your response, I feel better about trying them with some color film. Thanks again.

    Tom
     
  6. Snapshot

    Snapshot Member

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    Using IR is a great idea. I think I'll looking to getting a set of IR goggles.
     
  7. bogeyes

    bogeyes Member

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    Could you use a cheap 50w reptile heat lamp for the light source and make some cheap goggles using lee theatrical filter gel congo blue and primaty red?
     
  8. resummerfield

    resummerfield Subscriber

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    I thought B&W Pan film was sensitive to all colors. I remember many years ago trying to load verichrome pan onto a developing spool under a dim safelight..... and it was totally fogged.
     
  9. buze

    buze Member

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    The Viper infrared self-illumination is not 100% infrared, it's about 850nm so it's visible ad a faint red light. Therefore it will have an impact on any Pan or color film...
    However you can also buy 940nm LEDs that are perfectly invisible and should be fine for any film.

    I just designed a 60 LED 'timer' for the darkroom using these LEDs, it should help illuminate the darkroom, and prevent me forgetting stuff in the fixer :D
    You can also buy a $10 LED 'headlamp' and replace the LEDs with 940nm ones, thats handy to inspect negatives...
     
  10. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Tom,

    Both, b&w and colour films have the same panchromatic sensitation.

    Exceptions are:
    orthochromatic films (b&w)
    infrared films (b&w and colour)
    Ilford Micrographic (which has a cut-out in the sensitation spectrum as colour papers)
     
  11. Albin

    Albin Member

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    It could help if you give us the brand of IR goggles you are using at Newlab in San Francisco.

    I want to make the good buy.

    Thank You :smile:
     
  12. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    Any nightvision goggles will work with IR illumination; they're designed in this manner so that they can be used with an IR light indoors or in total darkness.

    Just make sure, as mentioned above, to use IR LEDs without any red or near-red (850nm or so) output.
     
  13. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    If your goal is simply to use IR goggles as an aid to loading reels, why would you need them in the first place? A little practice and you can do it as easily in total darkness as you can sighted. Seems like an awful lot of trouble to go through for very little gain.
     
  14. Philippe-Georges

    Philippe-Georges Member

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    For goggles : look at FJW Industries from Illinois, this is what I have, and as a light-source : the famous Kodak safe light lamp-house with a n° 11 filter (CAT 107 9326), works fine.

    Good luck,

    Philippe