LomoKino

Discussion in 'Lo-Fi Cameras' started by drumlin, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. drumlin

    drumlin Member

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  2. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Well, the term "video" is typically used in relation with electronic image capture for moviemaking (might it be analogue or digital).


    Yes, you would best use reversal ("slide") film. As was done in the heydays of Super8.
     
  3. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Except being a toy or basic camera, interesting are two features:


    -) the aspect ratio of 2.8 (though with a standard angle of view)

    -) the extremely limited length of film (type 135 cassette)

    -) the extremely low frame rate


    That camera is less a movie camera than forming a class of its own.
     
  4. MDR

    MDR Member

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    You have to use Slide Film or cross process negative film or you could use negative film and strike release prints from your negative. Instead of using positive images for your cinematic vision you could also make a negative film :smile:
    I usually don't like the lomographic society but this is finally a product I will buy simple love the Idea of making handcranked movies

    Dominic
     
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  5. Tom Kershaw

    Tom Kershaw Subscriber

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    I wonder how much a hand cranked 35mm camera would cost that took 30m rolls of film with an F-mount or similar - 24 fps, 1000 EURO?

    Tom
     
  6. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    You can get a Konvas motor driven 35mm movie camera for about $300 on ebay.
     
  7. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    I am member of a group which intensifies on soviet cameras. they are serious people and lots of konvases trading and they do us senate ads to commercials to movies with these cameras. I didnt handle one but heard they are noisy and terrible for sound recording with them. and looks to me bulky , heavy and ugly but you can expect as same as from a more expensive and quality camera.

    The great thing is to able to use soviet cinema lenses . These lenses are made by LOMO and 20 years ago they were making quality cameras lenses as spacecrafr technology. You can pay 400 to LOMO and get better quality than 7000 euro zeiss.
    If you intended to invest 1000 , best bet is LOMO and Konvas
     
  8. drumlin

    drumlin Member

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    My thoughts exactly. Not in the market for a serious movie (not video) camera, but what a great way to do some fun lo-fi clips.
     
  9. MDR

    MDR Member

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    The Konvas seems like a great camera but for a little more money say € 1400 you can find (with some luck) an Arri 35 II with a Schneider lens set. By the way I would never buy a Konvas that only costs 300$ as you're likely to have to invest a few 1000 $ for repairs. And Mustafa you're absolutely right when you say that LOMO lenses were good they still are by the way after all the famous Vantage Hawks used for movies like Star Wars Episode one and Das Leben der Anderen are nothing but rehoused and slightly recomputed (some say that even the recalculation was done in Russia) Lomo Anamorphic lenses. This is actually one of the reason why I hate the Lomographic society they use the name of a first class optical company (optically on par with Zeiss not always mechanicaly though) and drag the good name of Lomo trough the mud by selling low tech low quality products that were not even made by LOMO.

    Dominik
     
  10. mhcfires

    mhcfires Subscriber

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    I am wondering how it would do with TMax-100 developed in the reversal kit? I'm tempted, but not sure if it would be a waste of money. I do have a Spinner 360, it is a fun camera for parties and such, was surprised that it was fairly well made, not like the Holga junkers. I think I'll wait on this one to see how people react to it before committing myself to another toy.
     
  11. MDR

    MDR Member

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    You're probably better off with Fomapan 100R or Filmotec Orwo UN54 both are designed for reversal processing and can be used for filmmaking especially Orwo UN54 which actually is a motion picture film stock and a very good one at that. But nothing speaks against using Tmax in the Lomokino (Exposure time is ca. 1/100 and it has three aperture settings at least according to the Lomographic guys) use f8 and be there at least in sunlight :smile:

    Dominik
     
  12. rhmimac

    rhmimac Member

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  13. snay1345

    snay1345 Member

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    This looks like a good way to get a high fps lomo camera. Yes a print might be at an unusual aspect ratio, but I think it would be kind of cool to throw a roll of tri-x in there and develop and enlarge some of the frames.
     
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  15. John Austin

    John Austin Member

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    Play for free,

    The co-ordinator of the local Saturday morning kids club is seriously interested in a Lomokino to show the group how film started - I shall be first to play, oops, I mean work, with it and reverse process some BW

    This is going to be a fun alternative to my Oh-So-Serious 10x8" work - Last WPPD QKC did a pinhole workshop - Results at http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2...ode=&groupname=Quinninup+Kids+Club&searchStr=
     
  16. johnielvis

    johnielvis Member

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    hmmmm lomokino is 3-5 fps

    I think the f4 can beat that....

    you can take quality jerky movies with one of them nikon LONG roll backs and a motor drive...maybe rig a way to turn the camera in to a projector too...just put a brite lite behind it and cut out part of the back....

    or put all the frames in slide trays like one of them old multi-projector slide show setups...they fire multiple slides very quickly---you can get a super superior effect.....

    get a bolex double 8 cheap and shoot that is my advice...i saw this ad and did just that...
     
  17. Joe VanCleave

    Joe VanCleave Member

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    I have the LomoKino and enjoy using it. From my perspective, it doesn't really pay to do reversal processing, since you can't run the film through a conventional film projector afterward, due to the odd-ball frame size. So, you're going to have to scan the film anyway in order to get it into a format that you can convert to a digital movie; it might as well be C-41 or hand-processed B/W.

    The LomoKinoScope is, in my view, not a tool for serious playback of the film, just a handy viewer to see what you have.

    As for the aperture setting on the camera itself, it has a continuous range of apertures from f/5.6 to f/11. Since the shutter is 1/100s in speed, using a handheld light meter is a handy way to ensure good exposures. Just set your meter to your film's ISO, reference the 1/100 speed and see if your scene is within the camera's f/5.6-11 range and set the aperture accordingly. If not, you have to change your scene's lighting or change film.

    ~Joe
     
  18. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    So regular negative film will work and in the viewer playback you see a positive image??
    This looks so cool .
     
  19. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    Ok stupid question, but I still think this is a very cool item. I have a Cannon 5d and can put it on video mode, but this could be a ton of fun.
     
  20. johnielvis

    johnielvis Member

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    you know.....in the olde days, they used to PRINT ENTIRE MOVIES on paper for copywrite purposes---this is when the law only allowed items printed on paper to be copywrited--as there was no other media at the time...so to ensure protection of their rights, they filed contact prints of the film on paper for the copyrite.

    but anyways....I was going somewhere with this....like print on paper and put it on one of those spinwheels that provides intermittant motion...or A FLIP BOOK...yeah...that's it.....maybe blow em up too --- you'd need to enlarge strips though--I just saw someone with a carrier that just sold for long strips of filim inthe enlarger---

    ideas.....far more ideas than time
     
  21. Discoman

    Discoman Member

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    The paper strips made into a flipbook?
    Try here http://wichm.home.xs4all.nl/cinimage.html
    It's the kinora camera. Takes 1" strips of paper or film, and those get processed into a flipbook that goes on a special viewer.

    To reply to OP, you may enjoy a cheap 8mm camera more. While it isn't 35mm, and has those other drawbacks, you can use standard equipment to view and project your film, as well as you get more run time per roll. Just my 2 cents. The lomokino just seems really expensive for what it is and what it can do, which an ordinary 35mm with a motor drive does.
     
  22. zekthedeadcow

    zekthedeadcow Member

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    Just thought I'd stop in (actually forgot I had an apug account :/ ) and let everyone know I motorized my lomokino with a cordless drill. APUG doesn't let me post links but search for motorized lomokino and it should show up on youtube.

    I'm doing a lot more shooting with it in the upcoming week... bulk loading some 5248 shortends and wastage. It's ability to use wastage is what I like most about it. It's biggest weakness isn't the short loads, 5 second daylight loads ought to be enough for anyone shooting a music video... but it's the lack of registration and the very short/ nonexistant take-up loop... so when driven at higher speeds the film is still moving with the shutter being open. ... however I only have expired film to work with and processing in caffenol so I'm happy with more than 4 shades of gray :smile:

    One think I've noticed while bulk loading is that the metal canisters work a lot better...the plastics were binding. I'm yet to checkito make sure full 36exp self loads work... 24exp do...

    Obviously if you buy commercial rolls and have a lab process then this gets to be a very expensive toy.

    The hardest thing for me to get used to is having to rewind a movie camera :smile:
     
  23. Thumb

    Thumb Member

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  25. arealitystudios

    arealitystudios Member

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    I was at my local camera shop yesterday picking up a few rolls of film and noticed this thing on the shelf. I decided, hey, why not? It wasn't expensive and it could be fun. I play around with Super 8mm every once in a while and this might be a fun alternative.

    One thing I always find hilarious about Lomo products is the literature that comes with the cameras is often of incredible quality. In this case the camera came with a "journal" that tells the story behind the creation of the Lomo Kino along with some nice images and drawings. I will never get over the fact that you can buy a modern Canon or Nikon for thousands of dollars with all the bells and whistles you can think of and it will come with an instruction manual that looks like it was photo copied and written by a five year old. But if you buy a Lomo you will get a bare bones plastic camera with a coffee table book in full color and glossy printing.

    Go figure...

    But anyway, all that being said all I've done so far is shoot a couple of rolls of my dog in the back yard. I shot it in black and white and plan on developing the rolls tonight to see what came out. The fixed shutter speed and limited choice of aperture isn't much different from shooting with a Holga. I'm not sure how much I'm going to enjoy the wide 16:9 aspect ratio but who knows, I may get used to it and embrace it a little more going forward. The concept seems very straight forward and I anticipate scanning each individual frame to put into a short movie to be kind of a b*tch but that's ok.

    I'm actually looking forward to the challenge of trying to tell a story in about 40 seconds. Call me crazy, but I think it's a little easier to tell a story with a single frame. Maybe not eaiser, just more what I'm used to doing so if nothing else the creative excercise might be fun.
     
  26. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    Actually that tells you a whole lot right there. One is about equipment integrity and quality and one is about being hip/cool and the social element around the product.

    I'm not anti toy camera I shoot Holga, Diana and such but the hipster movement around it is seriously irritating sometimes.