Long exposures with colour

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Gary Holliday, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. Gary Holliday

    Gary Holliday Member

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    I have always been interested in this style of merging colour in landscapes, but have never got round to producing anything.

    How would I create this type of image?
    Exposure, filters, reciprocity?
     

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  2. Discpad

    Discpad Member

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    Lens tilt?
     
  3. bob100684

    bob100684 Member

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    more than 5 seconds of exposure.
     
  4. Gary Holliday

    Gary Holliday Member

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    I think my question should ask how does long exposures effect transparency film?
    When does reciprocity kick in with velvia or provia?
     
  5. Doyle Thomas

    Doyle Thomas Member

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    I start adding for reciprocity after 4 seconds. After 30 seconds I add a full stop. after 2 min I add 2 stops. I have made Velvia exposures to 8 min.

    Doyle
     
  6. HerrBremerhaven

    HerrBremerhaven Member

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    Kodak E100VS works quite well with little to no additional exposure out to one minute. Beyond that, you might want to add 1/3 stop more exposure to 3 minutes, and 2/3 stop more exposure beyond 7 minutes. There is sometimes a slight blue shift in very long exposures (beyond 4 minutes).

    If you are doing this in the daytime, and using ND filters, then you have another factor to consider. Some ND filters are not perfectly neutral. On longer exposures, any colour cast from an ND filter will alter the final result on film. You might not see, or notice, a colour cast on shorter exposures, but as time increases the effect can be more noticeable. Buy good ND filters.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio
     
  7. John Curran

    John Curran Member

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    After 128 secs for provia and after 4 secs or longer for velvia. My info comes from data sheets that may be out of date (for velvia at least). Fuji has just re-released velvia and I don't know if their new formulation has changed this. You can download film data sheets from fuji to find out.

    best regards

    john