Longevity of Ektachrome

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by mgb74, Sep 13, 2009.

  1. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

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    A while ago, I obtained a somewhat large quantity of 120 Ektachrome. I knew it was seriously outdated, but since it was out of it's boxes and even it's foil wrapper, I did not know how old. I guessed it was at least 5 years out of date.

    I wasn't even sure of the storage. I did know that it had been stored at room temp for at least a year before I obtained it.

    Anyway, I recently shot and had a roll processed. Looked just fine to me; exposure was right on and no evidence of color shift. Speaks well for the longevity and stability of the film.
     
  2. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

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    That's great. Do you have any idea how it was stored?
     
  3. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

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    My guess, since it originally came from a studio, is that it was refrigerated for much of it's "in date" like, but at room temp for the last few years.
     
  4. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

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    That's pretty good! Ektachrome is great to work with.
     
  5. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    The real question is the longevity of the processed image. I've seen some E4 that is quite disappointing, but some from the same roll remained fine. All were given the same storage, and projector exposure.

    I haven't seen a badly faded/shifted e6, but I bet there are some.