Looking for an easy home made solution to glue a FB print on a canvas.

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by Rom, Aug 29, 2011.

  1. Rom

    Rom Member

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    Dear all,

    I cannot spend too much money and I am looking for a way to glue some of my prints on a canvas.

    It s a FB paper. I have seen some spray glue, like the tetenal. Are they good and easy to use ?

    I would like to find something that I can realise at home with common tool that I can afford or find it easily..


    Any advices are welcome as I am a newby in that step.

    Thanks

    Cheers :smile:
     
  2. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    Consider PVA (polyvinyl acetate). I have used it to bind a book including gluing fabric to archival board. You should be able to find it in an art supply and it is neutral ph.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  3. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    I forgot to add that it would be permanent. I think anything used that will release will alter the surface of the canvas and paper because of the textures involved
     
  4. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    sprays are not good for you are the environment.

    If the print isn't too large, you can dry mount it with an iron, some kraft paper, and of course the proper backboard and mounting tissues.
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    hi rom

    you can make a simple archival wheat paste by heating water and flour ( farine ) together
    i haven't made any in a while but i believe it is 1 part flour 2 parts water ...
    there are variations of this recipe that say 2.4 dl water + 45ml of flour
    either way, you add / stir the flour into boiling water &C and let it cool
    wheat paste is archival and holds pretty well ...
    when pasting a print to canvas spread the paste on the canvas or print
    put waxed paper ontop of the print and under the canvas ( waxed paper won't stick )
    and put a piece of board or something larger than the print over the print ...
    then put books or stones or something heavy on top of it ...
    you have to be careful because the paper and the canvas will dry out at different times
    so do a few tests with scraps of paper and canvas before you do your finished print.

    when the time comes that you want to remove the print from the canvas, just put in water
    and the paste will release ...

    have fun !
    john
     
  6. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    As Mr. Nanian noted, wallpaper paste (wheat paste) is a standard mounting method. Wallpaper paste has a fungicide in it so the paste won't support mold.
     
  7. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    things that dry at different rates can be tricky ...
    its best to brush from the center out to the edges when you coat your materials
    i used to wait for the paper
    to curl a little to know it was "dry enough " to paste the rest down,
    and then use the heal of your palm to push the paper onto the receiving
    sheet again from the center out to the edges ... this gets the air bubbles out
    ( and its kind of fun too :smile: )

    the zeier- book ( books boxes and portfolios )
    http://www.amazon.com/Books-Boxes-Portfolios-Step-Step/dp/0830634835
    gives great step by step instructions
    for making stuff out of paper and board, and these methods can easily be transfered
    to other materials ...

    good luck !
    john
     
  8. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    Wet mounting will curl the mount toward the print as it drys. The solution is a scrap print on the back side. This normally is done on large panel prints.

    Best to dry prints flat and use a linen tape hinge or dry mount.
     
  9. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I found a product called "Photo Glue Stick" , it's acid free and designed to be used for photos only. It's marketed by Pioneer Photo Albums Inc., comes in a yellow tube that rsembles a giant chap stick. I buy mine at the local hardware.
     
  10. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    Wet mounting takes some practice. Don't try it on your best print. A good art store paste is Yes glue,
    if it is slightly diluted. But the best commercial adhesive are Seal VacuMount and the glue made by
    Daige for their automatic wet coaters. The best applicator is a closed-cell foam miniature "hotdog"
    roller and frame from the paint store. You need to work quickly, before the glue starts drying. Big
    prints are challenging, because you have to be extemely careful, after attaching a leading edge, to
    gradually lower the print while using a hard wallpaper brayer or formica roller to work it down.
    Afterwards you place a flat weight over the whole thing until the glue dries. Countermounting is generally recommended unless the canvas is stretched quite tight first on a frame. Spray adhesives
    are quite unhealthy to worth with, generally fail for anything but small prints, and aren't particularly
    archival. Wet mounting is very economical, archival, and simple in principle, but tricky to learn to
    do correctly, esp with large prints. You also need a room humidity level low enough for the glue to
    fully dry, but not so low or hot as to get the glue to set prematurely.
     
  11. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    Yes Glue brand is pretty useful, Ive reattached leather panels with it with great success.
     
  12. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Another vote for Yes stickflat glue. When I use this to mount prints, I draw thin lines on the mount board just smaller than the print. Then I use it straight without diluting. Wash hands, keep some wet paper towels nearby and work near a sink. Get a gob the size of an acorn on thumb and rub firmly to spread the glue reasonably thin. Work carefully when you go to the lines. Wash hands again and then lay the print on top and press it down. I have never lost a print this way though I almost always have to wipe off small bits of misplaced glue.
     
  13. Joe O'Brien

    Joe O'Brien Member

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    I'll cast my lot in with the wheatpasters, I've known a few people to use this paste to put up posters [This is actually called wheatpasting] and those posters seem to never come down!
     
  14. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    Both Yes glue, those simple nontoxic paste pens, and traditional wallpaper glues are just various formulas of wheat dextrin. The only serious drawback besides accidentally getting a sticky fingers etc on the face of the print, is that booklice will feed on this kind of substance. As you probably already know, at various terrible times in modern history, including the siege of Leningrad in WWII, people tried
    to stay alive by pulling down the wallpaper and licking the paste.
     
  15. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    i have eaten a pan full of wheat paste before ... thinking it was something else.
    it tasted vaguely like cream of wheat ... and that is what i convinced myself
    it was as i was eating it ... i only realized as i was eating the last
    spoonful that it was wheat paste. just in case you were wondering,
    it was pretty filling and mildly sweet. ( i made it with king arthur flour )