Looking for Slavich Unibrom paper

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by WGibsonPhotography, Jan 24, 2009.

  1. WGibsonPhotography

    WGibsonPhotography Member

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    I'm considering trying out Slavich Unibrom paper. I've seen scans of prints made on this paper, and I like what I've seen. I'm going to start out with a pack of 25 8x10 matte or semi-matte (I'm not a glossy fan) grade 2 paper just to try it out. If I like it, I'd like to move up to printing on 11x14 because I like to make 8x12 prints. I dont have to crop anything if I'm shooting 35mm, and I'll have a border around the print.

    The problem is IF I like the paper and want to buy 11x14 sheets in the future, where can I get a pack of 100 sheets? Freestyle only has packs of 10 and 25 sheets of grade 2 matte and semi matte Slavich Unibrom paper (Unless i'm overlooking it somehow).

    I have plenty of time to find a pack of 100 since it's gonna be a few weeks before I'm back in the school's darkroom. If I have to, I'd settle for buying a few packs of 25 sheets.
     
  2. drazak

    drazak Member

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    I would give freestyle an email, they're the only retailer of Slavich paper. They may be able to prorate you on 4 packs of 25 sheets at a price more like 100 sheets.

    Ben
     
  3. jmcd

    jmcd Member

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    Great stuff. It is contrasty, so it likes a relatively flat negative. I really like the single weight (glossy for me).
     
  4. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    I think Freestyle is the US importer of Slavich papers. If they don't have it, then it isn't in the USA.
     
  5. WGibsonPhotography

    WGibsonPhotography Member

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    I've read somewhere (probably here on APUG that grade 2 Slavich Unibrom paper is more like a grade 3. That's the only think I'm nervous about. I'm teaching myself the Zone System, and I dont want a contrasty paper to make learning more difficult. Unfortunately, the Zone System isnt something that's taught in detail at the school I go to (a community college), so I'm learning it from books.

    I know about exposure, how to develop and print negatives, and how to use contrast filters. I'm wanting to perfect my skills because I'm graduating in the fall, and I want to show off some more professional looking prints than I already have.
     
  6. Andrew Moxom

    Andrew Moxom Member

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    The other thing to note about Slavich is that it can be 'played' around with in soft developers like selectol soft, or even a water bath to get mid grades and to take the oomph out of it being a punchy and under graded in it's contrast rating. It has many possibilities to get great results.
     
  7. WGibsonPhotography

    WGibsonPhotography Member

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    That's cool. I might look in to that if I decide to go with Slavich. Thanks :smile:
     
  8. Silverhead

    Silverhead Member

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    Freestyle is indeed the importer, and they've had it on their web site for about a year now, I think.
     
  9. VaryaV

    VaryaV Member

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    I love Slavich Unibrom Grade 2 - Freestyle is where I get mine.

    Marianne (Mayfair710) has posted some quite beautiful work using Slavich, in the galleries you might want to check out.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 26, 2009
  10. jmcd

    jmcd Member

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    "I've read somewhere (probably here on APUG that grade 2 Slavich Unibrom paper is more like a grade 3. That's the only think I'm nervous about."

    From least to most contrast, I have arrived at the following order: Ilford, Kentmere, Slavich. Still, I find I get more latitude within a given grade with a graded paper than with a variable contrast paper. I also keep several types of paper on hand, and make a chart with regards to contrast and paper speed so that I can easily print a negative on several papers with a minimum of having to start over. For 35mm, I try to expose and develop so that proof sheets look good on Grade 3 Arista II RC VC. This puts my negatives in a pretty safe zone, so that I can usually print successfully on Slavich Grade 2, or Kentmere grade 2 or 3. A package of variable contrast paper makes for a secure "belt and suspenders approach."

    I would not want to be held to a single grade of paper when printing from a roll of 35mm negatives, though.

    I really like the Slavich and Kentmere papers and appreciate that they are relatively reasonably priced. But, I use them because I prefer them.
     
  11. Andrew Moxom

    Andrew Moxom Member

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    They make it in G2 through G4, but effectively that is G3 through G5. It's not really a hindrance, in fact this give you more range and with careful use of water bath and selectol soft or two bath print development, you have plenty of control open to you. I would not let it worry you about this either. Keep some of each grade, and you are good to go.

    The other thing to realize is that the Unibrom version is actually the coldest toned bromide paper currently available today. It reminds me quite a bit of the way old Agfa Brovia used to behave. Enjoy.....
     
  12. WGibsonPhotography

    WGibsonPhotography Member

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    Thanks everyone for the feedback. I really havent heard any overly negative comments on the forums and google searches I've checked out. I might give it try next time I have some money.

    Just one more question: What developer should I use? I know that's a subjective question, but if one paper developer is suggested way more than another, I might give that one a try first.
     
  13. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    I've recently started to try it out, I'm using Liquidol from the Formulary, which is my normal stuff. However, one Slavitch fan I know uses Amidol with a water bath. I have a package of Formulary Weston's Amidol that I bought specifically for the Slavitch, but I haven't mixed it up yet.

    So far, I really like it, I will absolutely be buying more of it.
     
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  15. WGibsonPhotography

    WGibsonPhotography Member

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    ok, so I finally bought a pack of 25 sheets of grade 2 slavich unibrom. I bought a pack of Dektol powder to use as the paper developer. It should be here by Saturday, hopefully. I'm looking forward to trying this paper out :smile:

    BTW, has anyone developed Slavich Unibrom in Dektol? I probably should have asked this before ordering :D
     
  16. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    My pack of paper mind you and with a condenser enlarger,
    Slavich printed grade 3 in a very soft developer, Beer's 1,
    and made grade 4 in Beer's 7. Beer's 7 is a tad bit more
    contrasty than Dektol.

    You'll save on fixer using Slavich. In a test of four papers
    Slavich required the least fixer; as much as 40% less.
    The other three papers were Arista, Emaks, and
    Kentmere Bromide. The bromide needed the
    most fixer. Dan
     
  17. WGibsonPhotography

    WGibsonPhotography Member

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    My slavich unibrom paper came in today, along with an apparent kick to the side of the box it was shipped in. I opened the box (the box it was shipped in, not the box of paper) to see if there was any damage. The only damage to the pack of paper was a few dings in the cardboard which porbably occured by rattling around in a damaged box.

    I took the paper to my darkroom/bathroom with the lights off to feel if there was any damage to the corners of the paper (which really isnt a problem because I usually print with a border, just did it out of curiosity). the paper comes in a fairly thick envelope that feels like plastic, which is what I expected. Just out of curiosity, is that envelope opaque black like the Arista paper? Being packaged in a thick envelope iside the box is a standard thing, right? I know that's a stupid question, but I've never used anything other than Arista. If I had red lights in my bathroom, I would have turned them on to check, but I havent gotten around to getting them yet
     
  18. Silverhead

    Silverhead Member

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    Yes, it's opaque black, and yes, it is standard. If it weren't, there would be mucho fogging of the paper.
     
  19. WGibsonPhotography

    WGibsonPhotography Member

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    I assumed that was the case, but I didnt want to take a chance until I opened it under safelights or asked someone that knew.
     
  20. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    Red safe lights are not needed with Slavich papers.
    I and a few others have found that to be the case.
    My orange-ish yellow safe lights used with other
    Graded papers work fine with Slavich. Dan
     
  21. Joe O'Brien

    Joe O'Brien Member

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    I'm sorry to resurrect such an old thread, but I just started using Slavich and I was wondering what the water bath that Andrew Moxom suggested is, and how is it to be used?
     
  22. Peter Schrager

    Peter Schrager Subscriber

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    water bath is used to bring in the highlites...use the first bath for the blacks
    then put in the water bath to let the highs come in....slavich will do this to a certain degree
    but it might be prudent to try an amidol developer
    Best, Peter
     
  23. VaryaV

    VaryaV Member

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    That's not what happened with mine this weekend. I forgot to turn my Amber safelight off during exposure by accident and it fogged the Slavich bad...

    I recommend red only or complete darkness (which works easier for me).:D

    I love the Slavich matte.
     
  24. VaryaV

    VaryaV Member

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    Regarding the water bath that Andrew mentioned... I am a bit confused... I was under the assumption that water can be used as a Stop bath.

    I am currently using the Slavich Unibrom #3 for a project and would love to try this 2-bath method to bring in more mid-range tones... can you extrapolate please.... and do I need to change developers? is that recommended? I use Ilford Multigrade pretty much as a standard.... thanks

    I would like suggested times and strengths
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 18, 2011
  25. Andrew Moxom

    Andrew Moxom Member

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    Water can be used for a stop bath, However for contrast control, the water bath method is just a way of reducing contrast range. The way it works is that the developer in the shadows where a lot of chemical activity is present will exhaust quickly when the print is placed into the water bath. The developer is still concentrated in the highlights and continues to be active even in the presence of water. Long story short, the shadows completely stop developing, while the highlights continue. So by placing a partially developed G4 print into a water bath for a few more minutes, and leaving it there with no agitation can reduce overall contrast of the paper close to half a grade or more.... Or thereabouts! YMMV.

    Back to the water as stop bath comment..... If you place the print into water, and agitate the print, you will dilute the devleoper action enough on the print to stop further development, even in the highlights... For contrast control, you do NOT agitate the print. Just pull it from the developer, and slide it straight into the water bath and let it sit until you see the highlights where you want them. Then process as normal.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 18, 2011
  26. VaryaV

    VaryaV Member

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    Excellent.... thank you for the details.