Loose tripod bushing on a B&J

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by KenS, Mar 19, 2009.

  1. KenS

    KenS Member

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    The tripod bushing on my 8x10 woodie is now "loose"... The camera had a tendency to 'rotate' a little when inserting the film holder due to the 1/4 inch
    metal bushing on the camera base having become so 'loose'. It now rotates quite freely.

    I am aware that the local hardware store has threaded inserts of this size,
    but I have to think that I might prefer to remove the existing insert then apply a small amount of epoxy and replace it. I am at a loss as to finding the best means of removing the current insert since it now rotates quite freely and a threaded 'bolt' with two or more locking nuts would be the solution for re-inserting but I need to get the original out first.

    Any and all suggestions from experienced bushing replacers would be appreciated.

    Ken
     
  2. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    A suggestion: get a piece of pipe of the same the same diameter and tap it out carefully, or use a round piece of wood the same size for it.

    If the buhsing is threaded just rotate it out !

    Peter
     
  3. KenS

    KenS Member

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    Peter,

    I am unable to determine how 'deep' the bushing is inserted into the 3cm maple
    wood.... it does not go all the way through, and, unlike many 'modern' bushing inserts
    there is no screwdriver 'slot'. I may have to resort to using that stuff (gad it's terrible
    getting old.. my memory fails me at the most awkward moments) my mechanic son
    uses to make sure bolts stay in place. If I 'glue' a 1/4" bolt in, I may be able to extract
    the bushing without too much damage, clean it, and re-insert using an epoxy glue.
    I might feel better if I can get the original to remain in its proper place rather than
    using the rather rough-looking inserts available (and can be ugly, because they are
    usually hidden from sight).

    ....but, I'm still open to other suggestions

    Ken
     
  4. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    In that case try an anker for brick walls: it has a bolt, a nut and a shell that goes outward when tightened.
    Ask you local hardware store, or use a plasic plug and srew of the right size.
    When that is solid, put a piece of wood on top of the tripod (to protect the top) and use pliers.

    Peter
     
  5. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    "Loctite". Make sure you use one of the weaker ones or it'll be permanent.

    Dan
     
  6. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    KenS,
    A conundrum, to be sure. There is no telling how that bushing has been placed in the camera; perhaps like a reversed mushroom with the parasol top between layers of the wood. So just yanking it out may lead to serious problems. Were it mine (and no brilliant solutions were to come to me in middle of night) I would use a drill press to drill out the metal; starting with a five eights bit just bigger than the quarter inch thread. I would then look to see what I up up against. I can see, then figuring out a way to remove the remainder of the bushing. I might then cut a piece of new maple as a plug to glue into the spot--afixing one of those drive in things you mentioned into the plug before using a professional grade wood glue to glue the whole assemblage back in to the hole. Or not.
     
  7. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    I don't think loctite will work between wood and metal.
     
  8. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    It wouldn't work at all. My impression is that he'll use it to "bond" a screw into the insert and once it's set up, use the screw as a "handle" to twist out the insert. If the insert is in any way deformed to lock it won't come out but if it's just threaded in it might. If the insert does come out cleanly, and it's fully sealed, I might be tempted to try to bond it back into the wood using Titebond II.

    Dan
     
  9. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    The more I think about trying to loctite a screw into place to help remove the bushing, the worse an idea I think it is. If the bushing doesn't twist out nicely/easily, if you try to pull you might splinter the wood, or, the screw will be stuck in there forever - if ithe bushing is still spinning inside the wood, how will you grab it with enough force to allow you to break the bond?

    Dan
     
  10. KenS

    KenS Member

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    Dan and John,

    I was thinking of something like Loctite to secure a 1/4 inch bolt in the bushing, using a wrench and some
    'pulltwist' to remove the bushing from the wood. If there's a problem with the inside surface of the remaining
    'hole' a Forstner drill bit might be utilised to make the new hole a little wider, and if required a maple 'plug'
    inserted, cut off and sanded flush after which pilot a new hole drilled.... hopefully the bushing might
    then be screwed back in with a small amount of epoxy glue on the thread to make sure it will be secured in
    place.

    Ken
     
  11. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    If it is a mushroom bushing bonded between layers of wood, you could dril a hole through the bushing and the wood at the same time and insert a pin.

    Please provide us with some pic's ! Then we might be coming up with the REAL solution !

    Peter
     
  12. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    Ken,

    It might work. Supposedly the B&J cameras are made of a very respectable maple (or such hardwood). Still, I worry about the wood splintering when you try to pull it out. And, as I said, if it doesn't come out, you won't be able to get the bushing off the screw. Another thought/question - if the bushing is turning inside the wood now, will you even be able to get a screw in there enough to use it as a handle? How loose is the bushing?

    Dan
     
  13. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Do you know a dentist with an x-ray machine?

    Matt
     
  14. richard ide

    richard ide Member

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    One way to remove the bushing might be to screw in a bolt with a nut on it. then tighten the nut against the bushing. You can then unscrew the bolt and the bushing will come out with it (providing that it is screwed into the wood).
     
  15. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    That'll work only as long as the bushing is protruding past the wood or the nut is no bigger than the outside diameter of the bushing. Once the nut locks down on the wood instead of only the bushing, it won't work.

    Dan
     
  16. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    *****
    You do not, methinks, want to go pulling that bushing out until you see what it is that's holding it in--if you splinter the wood, you are in a bad prediciment. It seems to me that if it will not just come out; and it is rotating; then there is something that is keeping it in place under the veneer (if there is some on your camera)--my mushroom analogy.
    Once you get it out without damaging the wood, then you have options; and easy ones, I should think.
    I used one of those quarter inch whatever they are called to mount a homemade wooden platform to hold my Ansco View Camera on a tripod at the center of gravity. It simply required countersinking the 1/4 inch hole wide enough to encompass the flange part; and just deep enough so that it does not impinge upon the tripod head. Epoxy did the rest.
     
  17. Bruce Osgood

    Bruce Osgood Membership Council Council

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    My experience with removing a bushing is to use what a Plumber calls a Star Wrench. You will probably lose the bushing but the idea is to tap the pointy Star Wrench into the bushing and buggering up the threads, then turn it out counter clockwise with a wrench. This assumes the bushing was initially screwed into the platform.
     
  18. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    *******
    There's a way to do it. We do it with gun stock repairs on occasion. But, the problem is knowing WHAT IS HOLDING IT IN If it's loose enough to turn, and not practically falling out, there is more to this than meets the eye. Literally. As mentioned above, if it is a "mushroom" bushing, all bets are off. Now, about that dentist with the x-ray machine......
     
  19. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    Well, Bruce. If I understand Ken's predicament, it is not screwed in; otherwise, since it is turning, it should screw out. Right?
     
  20. Fotoguy20d

    Fotoguy20d Subscriber

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    FWIW, I took a look at my own 5x7 B&J just now. There's a counterbore, just slightly larger than the bushing (maybe 3/8 or a bit more), from the top side of the baseplate. I'm guessing the bushing is installed through there - makes sense - if it has a small flange (maybe knurled) it would be impossible to pull out through over tightening the tripod. The bottom of the c'bore is metal, which supports my guess. You might try gingerly tapping at it from the bottom and see if it pushes out (hopefully without too much splintering of wood). I take no responsibility for what happens if you do that though.

    Dan
     
  21. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    I'd drill a small hole into the edge of the bushing area to open a passage to the area around the bushing then use a syringe to pump some gorilla glue into the hole. This will only work if the threaded hole in the bushing does not go through the end, otherwise as the gorilla glue expanded on setting it would fill the hole. Maybe if a well greased bolt was threaded in that would solve that problem, allowing removal of the bolt after the curing and leaving an open hole.
     
  22. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    Glbeas has a quick solution I think. Since the Gorilla glue is a polyurethane it's going to expand to fill the gaps & it bonds to just about anything.
    I'd get that 1/4" bushing out of there myself & replace it with a brass 3/8 T-nut inserted from the top. rockler tools has the t-nuts available