Lubricating a shutter?

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by Dave Dawson, Aug 8, 2009.

  1. Dave Dawson

    Dave Dawson Member

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    Hi All, You may have seen in other threads that I have a Sinar electronic behind the lens shutter that is intermitent.

    Sometimes it works fine at all speeds without any problems, it manually opens and closes using the slide switch to focus etc. The iris control also works fine.

    Occasionally a blade (two rotary type) will stick and if it jams it will blow the 1.25A slow blow fuse in the battery box ..I've blown about 20:mad:

    The more I play with the shutter the more convinced I am that a little lubrication on the circumference of the blades will cure the problem:smile:...Here comes the question.......What type of grease/graphite/other should be applied and is it easily available?

    Any offers of help appreciated....Cheers Dave

    ps If I get it working reliably I promise to shut up about this shutter:rolleyes:
     
  2. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    Shutterblades should never be lubricated !

    Go to www.image2output-support.com/sinar/ and download all the manuals you need for your Sinar.
    After reading it you should be able to solve your problem.

    Peter
     
  3. Dave Dawson

    Dave Dawson Member

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    Hi Peter, I downloaded and printed out the link above some time ago but it doesn't contain any maintance about the electronic shutter. It's mainly for the copal shutter, a bit about the battery pack and a bit about the Expolux (a different beast) whoever it does mention lightly lubricating the channel the rotary blades rotate in. It also mentions a blade upgrade for the electronic version...BUT Sinar no longer support the electronic version and Sinar in Switzerland didn't even reply to an email!

    Cheers Dave
     
  4. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Blown fuses are generally caused by an intermittant short. The only other possibility, could be a sticking solenoid, which could cause overheating of the circuit. In my early years, I used a 70mm rollfilm camera for portraits, and the shutter solenoid would occasionally stick. It caused me a lot of grief until I figured out that was the problem. Test the solenoid first, if that isnt the problem then check for shorts.
    Rick
     
  5. Dave Dawson

    Dave Dawson Member

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    I have noticed that both activating solenoids give a little spark as they operate but the jamming is <0.1% of the operations.

    Cheers Dave
     
  6. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    Hi Dave,
    Are they solenoids or relays of some sort? I ask because I've never seen a sparking solenoid. Is it closing a contact external to the solenoid?
     
  7. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    I know shutters aren't supposed to be lubricated, but I've had luck on old gummy ones by hosing them off with zippo lighter fluid. The fluid evaporates leaving behind only the slightest lubricating layer. I started doing this with my 10/22 triggers because any other fluid makes them gum up and no lubricant at all makes them feel harsh. I fixed a nonworking Isolette shutter just by giving it a lighter fluid bath; it's still working.
     
  8. Dave Dawson

    Dave Dawson Member

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    Well unless I'm mistaken...A relay operates to activate contacts whilst a solenoid moves a cam or rod. As it releases the blades from the their home position, they are solenoids.

    Cheers Dave
     
  9. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    If those solenoids are sticking: clean them with lighter fluid.
    Blown fuses are a sign of an overload or (temporairy short) somewhere in the circuit.
    Sparks over the contacts is a sign of trouble, I would have to see that myself.

    Is there a Sinar Service point in the UK ?
    Otherwise you could contact the Dutch Sinar rep.
    They speak english and hekp you further.

    I am still in Brazil, back in Holland early September for at least 3 month.

    Peter
     
  10. Dave Dawson

    Dave Dawson Member

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    Hi Peter, Yes there is a service department in the UK but I'm told they would send the shutter to Switzerland for a minimum set fee and I would prefer to fix it myself or have it done locally if I can (I did take it to a repairer in London who had it for a month and then said he couldn't do anything with it...He didn't even realise he had blown the fuse!)

    Cheers Dave
     
  11. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    Talk to Photal first, if they come up with the same story as in the UK give me a PM and I can see what I can do.
    I have been into reapairs (and electronics) for the past 30 years.

    London is not that far away from The Hague I think.

    Peter
     
  12. Dave Dawson

    Dave Dawson Member

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    Having worked up the courage to remove the screws that hold the main assembly of the shutter and removed that to reveal the two blades, it is now obviuos that the problem is that there is too much friction on the blades for them to be 'thrown' the whole of their travel and to their home position. I have cleaned the blades with I.P.A and am wondering what is best to use to lightly lubricate the edges of the blades?

    Rub some graphite powder sparingly on the edges?

    "I'LL FIX THIS SHUTTER EVEN IF IT KILLS ME"!!!!!!!

    Cheers Dave
     
  13. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    Use a Q-tip (cotton swap on a stick) and rub the edge of the blade with graphite.

    Blow off any exess graphite and see how it works.
    Otherwise send me a PM, I can miss a thread when I am not watching.

    Good luck !
    Peter
     
  14. Dave Dawson

    Dave Dawson Member

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    Will do Peter, Thanks for your tip.

    Cheers Dave
     
  15. jfdupuis

    jfdupuis Member

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    I had once a lens that had its leaf shutter sticky. I dismantled the shutter and cleaned each blades with methanol and remounted its without touching with fingers to avoid leaving any trace of any substance. Shutter now work like a charm. I would avoid to use any lighter fluid as it get sticky when drying. Methanol is a much nicer solvent.

    As a dry lubricant, graphite might be nice. However, I just cleaned another lens with a lot of particles on the glass surfaces surrounding the shutter blades. I don't really know if those particles are coming from the abrasion of the blades under friction or from usage of dry lubricant like graphite.