Luna Pro F Enlarging Attachment

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by johnnywalker, Mar 24, 2008.

  1. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    I have this light meter with the enlarging attachment, but no directions on how to use it. I've tried playing with it thinking I could work it out, but without success. The first problem is that it seems to be at the limit of its range with a 35 mm negative for an 8X10 photo. Anybody have the manual for this gadget, or some experience using it? Or should I just forget it and buy an EM 10? Thanks in advance for any advice!
    John
     
  2. dbseney

    dbseney Member

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    I have the instruction folder for this unit (you could hardly call it a manual) and will be happy to send you a copy if you email me your address.

    Donald
    dbseney@sbcglobal.net
     
  3. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

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    Test strips are easier.
     
  4. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    I have to agree. I have both (yes "both") the enlarging attachment for the Gossen and the Ilford device. I've found that I can "eyeball" the neg on the easel and hit the right range for a test strip most of the time. As usual, YMMV.
     
  5. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    I hope to be able to do that as well, but in the meantime I'm also hoping this gadget will shorten the learning/experience curve.
     
  6. 23mjm

    23mjm Member

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    I too fell into the enlarging attachment trap too----test strips are quicker. The only thing I found it was really useful for was if you went from 5X7 to 8X10 you could measure a spot--raise the enlarger head--watch the light fall off--then open the lense back up till the meter returned back to the same spot. But only useful if you are using the same neg and paper.
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    These are useful for measuring light intensity.

    If you need to do a contact sheet, you can standardize your light, and expose contacts reliably.

    If you have a clear negative, you can adjust for base plus fog at any magnification, and have a reliable, repeatable starting point for your test prints.

    If you have a standard target (e.g. grey card) or similar item/detail in a number of different negatives, you can adjust exposure as cropping and magnification change, and as a result have a reliable, repeatable starting point for your test prints.

    All of this depends, of course, on starting with a good print, from a representative negative, and then working back.

    I purchased a 110 carrier for my enlarger for just this purpose. I leave an unexposed but developed piece of film in it, and after setting cropping and magnification and starting filtration, I swap the carrier with the negative I am seeking to print with my 110 carrier. I measure the light, adjust the aperture and have a useful starting point for my tests.

    The EM10 is probably more convenient, but the Gossen enlarging attachment is definitely usable.

    Matt
     
  8. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    I have the Gossen Lab attachment and have used it quite a bit to show students the contrast range of a negative of theirs in the enlarger, it is good for a newish person to get a handle of the inherent contrast in a negative, once they know the contrast range they can select a suitable hard or soft filter which enables them to be in the ball park regarding paper grade.

    The use of a Gossen meter which has 1/3 stop increments marked on the scale, cannot be underestimated with regard to exposure time changes. This can be a great help in letting you determine a specified f/stop, then you alter the time in 1/3 stops of units to get an accurate exposure.

    If you are really hard pressed with paper and cannot afford to waste even one sheet of paper, then this and like tools, can, and do work well for this purpose.

    Personally I don't use this instrument anymore for this purpose, however it is good to show students the contrast part of it's ability.

    I also have the Ilford EM10, great tool but not as versatile, however a lot cheaper if you don't already own a Gossen meter.

    I too have the instructions for use booklet, I could photocopy it if required.

    Mick.
     
  9. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    I have one, but like 23mjm I just use it for changing print size during a session. I pick a spot to measure, then reset the enlarger for the new size and measure that spot again, and adjusted accordingly. But I haven't bothered to try and calibrate to my materials so that I could use it as an actual meter.
    If you nail down the min time to max black through base fog, then you'll almost always be within a stop or so of the correct exposure for most negatives. If you're a numbers person, then the meter might be a good approach, otherwise you will likely find test exposures on paper easier and more informative.