Macro Flash Adaptor

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by bvy, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. bvy

    bvy Subscriber

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    Recently I made a post in the WTB section for a flash adaptor for the Olympus XA4. The XA4 is a 35mm compact with f3.5 28mm lens, and it focuses as close as twelve inches. I didn't get a response, and I didn't really expect to. The camera iself is pretty rare, and the flash adaptor is even harder to come by. It is pictured and described here:
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/olympusxa/discuss/72157623461621606/

    I think my chances of finding one are pretty slim. However, looking at the thing, it doesn't seem to be much more than a diffuser and a mirror on a hinge. How hard would it be build something like this? What would I need to consider?
     
  2. Dan Fromm

    Dan Fromm Member

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    Not to be a complete idiot or anything, but why would you want to use a viewfinder camera for shooting closeup? The days of focusing frames for, e.g., Kodak Instamatics, are long gone.

    When shooting closeup there's really no substitute for a camera that allows focusing and composing through the lens. For mobile subjects, including flowers that blow in the wind, an SLR is ideal. A view camera will work for static subjects.

    Shooting closeup is challenging enough that there's no reason to hobble yourself with unsuitable equipment.
     
  3. bvy

    bvy Subscriber

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    Two reasons: The XA4 is pocketable, and I already get good results. I take it out on my lunch hour and often visit (some might say) dubious areas. My subjects are walls, signs, poles, litter, etc. I won't be lugging a view camera or even an SLR around. But it's not a hindrance. On the XA4 I dial the focus all the way down to 1 (foot) and use the camera's wrist strap to measure distance. Dead on. And easy to correct for parallax.
    0083-000.jpg

    Anyway, I'm looking to use the flash for the same type of shooting but in low light, at night, in winter...