Magnetism and photographic imagery

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by cliveh, Jul 13, 2012.

  1. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Could you employ magnets beneath the contact printing process of Cyanotypes to create special effects?
     
  2. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    No. The Iron salts present are not magnetic!

    PE
     
  3. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Iron is magnetic!
     
  4. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    The iron salts are not.
     
  5. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Oh, not even a little bit?
     
  6. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Only if you put some salt and pepper on it.
     
  7. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Not even a little bit and even with salt, pepper, oregano and basil! NOT MAGNETIC!

    Some Stainless Steel is non-magnetic as well and it is basically iron!

    PE
     
  8. illumiquest

    illumiquest Member

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    Well this has been entertaining.
     
  9. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    So are we saying ferric ammonium oxalate has no magnetic properties?
     
  10. Oxleyroad

    Oxleyroad Subscriber

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    Yes it has been interesting, and I could go on about how you can influence the magnetic characteristics of stainless steel, but it has absolutely nothing to do with making prints. :smile:
     
  11. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Why should it be about making prints?
     
  12. Photo Engineer

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    I have a suggestion.

    Go out and buy the biggest and strongest magnet you can and then try to drag some Ferric or Ferrous salt out of solution with it. If you do, then patent it and write it up for your Nobel Prize.

    :D

    PE
     
  13. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Curses. I was expecting something novel from this thread.
     
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  15. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    the heck with a rare earth or electro magnet
    throw an electric charge through the cyanotype
    while you print it and its subject and see if you can get a cyanokirilian print :wink:
     
  16. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    What about a strong, alternating magnetic field such as that which might be generated by a rotating drum with magnets fixed to its surface in alternate N-S-N-S fashion?

    You can use this technique to REPEL copper, aluminum and other non-ferromagnetic metals. It's the eddy currents which cause the repulsion.
    This is how trash recycling machines separate ferromagnetic metals, non-ferromagnetic metals and paper/plastic/trash. First, they use a magnet to suck up the steel and iron. Then they use a rotating drum magnet to repel the copper, aluminum, etc. into a chute.

    Would this technique work in our case?
     
  17. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    But if you add some imported Parmesan Cheese, viola! It sticks to a magnet!
     
  18. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    NO Tk. I tried it with a vintage Parmegiano Reggiano and it did not work! Sorry.

    I am working on a Molle to see if it will work! :D

    PE
     
  19. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    It is important not to confuse atoms with ions. Their magnetic properties are very different.

    There are three types of magnetic susceptability; paramagnetism, diamagnetism, and ferromagnetism. The first two are extremely small and need special equipment to be measured. Most materials exhibit either paramagnetism or diamagnetism. A very few substances like iron exhibit ferromagnetism.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 14, 2012
  20. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Nickel is magnetic, and nickel isn't iron.:wink:
     
  21. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Can light or radiation have an effect on ferromagnetism, to a degree that it could be utilized in some fashion to make an image? I'm kind of thinking along the lines of Xerox; where a charged plate of selenium loses that charge with light exposure. Any kind of similar phenomenon we can exploit with magnetism?
     
  22. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Curie effect.
     
  23. Photo Engineer

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    Never said that it wasn't.

    In fact, the AlNiCo magnet was one of the strongest until recent advances in materials science passed it up. I don't know what the leader is now.

    Under very high magnetic force, it has been demonstrated that most objects are magnetic. In fact, a recent demo on TV showed a spider suspended in a chamber, in mid air, by a huge magnetic field.

    The electromagnetic forces allow electrons to create magnetic fields and magnetic fields create electricity. This has been known for hundreds of years, and was demonstrated by Benjamin Franklin among others. These fields can influence radiation, but they cannot influence light. Gravity can influence light, but there is no electrogravitic force or magnetogravitic force (as once was thought) that can combine all 3 forces and allow control over light, magnetiism and electricity.

    PE
     
  24. Mike Ware

    Mike Ware Member

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    Faraday Effect

    Put "Faraday Effect" into Wikipedia, and go from there.
    It's been known almost as long as photography.
    Not the easiest way to modulate an image, I think ...
     
  25. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    And cobalt.


    Steve.
     
  26. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    But can they influence chemical reaction?