making alkaline fix

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Justin Cormack, Oct 13, 2007.

  1. Justin Cormack

    Justin Cormack Member

    Messages:
    181
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Location:
    London
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I am going to try using a staining developer for the first time. Everything suggests using an alkaline fixer to keep the stain. I dont have any and while there is a thread on converting rapid fix to alkaline, I also have plain hypo. I havent measured the pH yet (I do have a meter though). Would this be easier than starting with rapid fix? What pH am I aiming for?
     
  2. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    4,351
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Montréal (QC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  3. mrtoml

    mrtoml Member

    Messages:
    548
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2005
    Location:
    Sheffield, U
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    You can also buy alkaline fix at monochromephotography.com and retro photographic if need be.
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,781
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Just dissolve 100 - 200 g / L of Sodium Hypo in water and you will be fine. Nothing else. Or use 100 - 200 ml/L of Ammonium Hypo solution 60% in water.

    Either will work as a one shot fix.

    PE
     
  5. john_s

    john_s Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,103
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2002
    Location:
    Melbourne, A
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    A neutral fixer seems just as good. Kodak Flexicolor Fixer, made primarily for colour processing, is good (pH=6.5, not alkaline but close) and very reasonably priced and more available because it's used everywhere. But don't just take my word for it, do a search.

    Also, the odour is minimal.
     
  6. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

    Messages:
    2,411
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Van Buren, A
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I use common Kodak Rapid fix, without the hardener, and I get good stain from my pyro developed negs.
     
  7. dancqu

    dancqu Member

    Messages:
    3,676
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Willamette V
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I routinely use plain hypo, sodium thiosulfate. After
    pouring the developer into the tank and commencing
    the agitation routine I rinse the beaker, fill with 500ml
    of water, and stir in 16 grams of the S. Thiosulfate
    anhydrous. Fresh fix each roll. A roll of Acros 100
    was clear within 8 minutes but allowed 2 more.
    3 inversions at start and 3 each half minute.
    No stop is needed as the fix is a one-shot.

    I've often measured the ph of straight S. Thio. and
    found it to run 6.8 to 7. You'r batch may differ. For a
    fix a little alkaline add one teaspoon of A&H bicarbonate
    of soda. The S. Thio? Perhaps a heaping tablespoon. Dan
     
  8. Peter Black

    Peter Black Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,001
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2005
    Location:
    Scotland, UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've got some of this and it is fine. Pity that it requires constant agitation for 5 minutes, but you don't find that out until you buy it. :sad: I wouldn't take it for granted that any of the neutral/alkaline solutions above would work well without special agitation, so maybe be aware of that?
     
  9. mrtoml

    mrtoml Member

    Messages:
    548
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2005
    Location:
    Sheffield, U
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I use a Jobo for this bit :D

    I think the Retro fixer doesn't specify constant agitation and I was going to give this a try, but haven't as yet.