Making slides of B&W photos

Discussion in 'New England' started by JustK, Feb 17, 2006.

  1. JustK

    JustK Member

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    Hi Folks! Just wondering if you know of anyone in the greater Hartford or Springfield area who can make slides of B & W photos? There's a juried show that I want to enter but they only take slides or a CD of your work. I'm not sure what to look for in the yellow pages. Thanks for any help!

    Looking forward to seeing everyone in March!
    Cheers, Krystyna
     
  2. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Why not do your own, its not that difficult to make slides from prints, also another route that we used to do at the store I worked at was we could scan a print and then with one of our machines do a slide from that scan..but again, slides are not that difficult to do.

    Dave
     
  3. papagene

    papagene Membership Council Council

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    Krystyna
    I agree with Dave... they aren't that difficult to do. But if you are still looking for someone, I'll PM you later when i get home from werk with the name and phone # of a friend that specializes in photographing artwork. I don't have time to look for his number - gotta get back to werk.

    gene
     
  4. Kino

    Kino Member

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    No, but if you want to send me 3 or 4 reloadable cartridges, I can spool up some 2302 Fine Grain Positive Motion Picture B&W stock you can use to make slides from negatives. It is about 6 to 8 ASA and will process in Dektol under a yellow safelight. (PM me if interested)

    You could contact print it or optically print it (with a slide duplicator).

    You'd have to play around with the processing times to determine your best density, but it should be about 7 to 8 min in Dektol @ 70 degrees to get normal gamma.
     
  5. JustK

    JustK Member

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    Hi Dave and Gene! Thanks for your replies!

    A friend had advised against making my own slides, which is why I asked. I did an internet search today and found some guidelines. So my new question is - Can I really get good results using my 35mm camera, a 50mm macro lens, Kodachrome 64 film, outdoors at mid-day in the shade, grey card for metering, bracketing exposures, and processing through my local camera shop?

    Thanks for any further help!
    Blessings, K
     
  6. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    I would not use kodachrome for slide duplication, I use Astia or Provia, even for B&W, kodachrome is to hard to get processed now a days, I always bracket 2 stops on either side and have extremely good luck with my stuff, it is really pretty easy, as long as you spend the time making sure you get exposures on either side of what the meter says, E6 is pretty easy to get processed, kodachrome is not all that easy.

    Dave
     
  7. JustK

    JustK Member

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    Great! Fuji Provia 100 slide film, I'll give it a try, thanks for the recommendation, and for saving me money, I can always count on APUG for the best advice! Krystyna
     
  8. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Evening, Krystyna,

    If you wish to use color slide film for copying B & W prints (entirely practical), you'd be better off with a tungsten film used under 3200 K bulbs. Using daylight film outside will certainly work, but you may get a less-than-clean result, since the color temperature under shady conditions isn't necessarily predictable. If you have the negatives, the approach suggested by Kino may be the best way to go. Nothing like B & W film to give good B & W results.

    Konical
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 18, 2006
  9. JustK

    JustK Member

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    Thanks Konical! I did read about setting up something indoors, then I'd have to buy lights and bulbs and worry about hot spots and all, but if the temperatures don't warm up here in the northeast I may have to give this a try!!

    And Kino! I thought that you were kidding with your advice, (until Konical recommended it), because I did not understand a word of it, cartridges? motion picture film? normal gamma?, I am sorry, my bad, there is much for me to learn, so thank you for your offer, but I think I will try to do this at home first.

    Cheers, Krystyna
     
  10. Kino

    Kino Member

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    OK, sorry for the confusion...

    http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/products/lab/h1so302.pdf

    I have some short-ends of 35mm film, normally used to make motion picture "prints" for theatrical distribution that I can spool up in reusable 35mm film cartridges and give you for free for the cost of shipping. If you send me the spools, it shows you are serious and would actually use the materials and I wouldn't be wasting my time or resources sending them.

    Since it is an intermediate stock, it does not have an ASA/ISO speed, but I estimate it to be around ISO 6 to 8; expose it accordingly.

    The film can be processed under a yellow safelight (pretty much only blue sensitive) in dektol paper developer; we use D97, but it should be about the same energy and time as D97.

    Nice thing about this is you can develop by watching it process in a reel and stop it when it gets about right.

    Gamma? Oh boy, well, forget that for now... ;-)

    Let me know if you change your mind...
     
  11. kentbulza

    kentbulza Member

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    That stock is on polyester?
     
  12. Kino

    Kino Member

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    Yep.

    The 2302 is polyester and the 5302 is acetate.

    Frank
     
  13. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Frank, besides the base, are there any other differences between the 5302 and the 2302? I've only seen so far people writing about the 5302, so I wasn't aware of the '2.
     
  14. donbga

    donbga Member

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    You will get more viewing time if you submit a CD. Most judges these days prefer CDs than slides.

    I'm assuming the prints aren't to large for a flat bed scanner to handle.
     
  15. Kino

    Kino Member

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    No, the emulsion is the same, but the base DOES make a bit of difference in the image upon projection; the acetate is a bit more diffused looking and the polyester a bit more contrasty than the acetate (all other things equal).

    I have the theory that polyester colimates the light better than the acetate, which tends to scatter it more; my SWAG (scientific wild-ass guess).

    We tend to aim for a total systems end gamma of 1.5 to 1.7 to allow for lowering of contrast via light scatter in the lens, the smudged projection port :wink: , the atmosphere and the dirty screen.

    Just being pragmatic! :wink: