Mamiya RB67 150 C Soft Focus - Damaged Mount swap?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by SkylineNZ, Oct 8, 2013.

  1. SkylineNZ

    SkylineNZ Member

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    Hi all,

    I was hoping someone here could help with a general RB67 lens question. I bought a 150 F4 Soft Focus that was damaged in transit. You can see in the images below the bent locking ring near the red and green dots. The knicks on the paint were probably from me trying to initially mount the lens before I realized something was wrong.

    Is it possible to swap in another locking ring? Maybe one from a beat up non-C or C lens? If so, can anyone provide a general walk through of the steps necessary for a swap?

    Thanks in advance!

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  2. Xuco Martin

    Xuco Martin Member

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    If My objective was to deliver what some mechanic or technician. Do not think it's a very expensive failure and seeing the condition of the objective is the most recommended
     
  3. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Depends where you bought it, maybe you can return it.

    Jeff
     
  4. Alan Gales

    Alan Gales Subscriber

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    Both the Mamiya RB 150mm SF and the RZ 180mm SF lenses sell for dirt cheap right now (I recently sold a boxed mint- example of the 180 for about $100.00 on Ebay). There doesn't seem to be much interest in them for some reason. I don't understand it because soft focus is all rage in large format and SF lenses go for a premium.

    You would probably be better off returning it and buying another. Just my 2 cents.
     
  5. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    Take the ring off n straighten it out. Use a wood block the same radius n tap it with a rubber chaser.

    To get the ring off yo have to remove a small stopper screw on the rim of the ring, you can see where it is as you reach the end of it's rotation where it stops turning.

    Then the ring will just unscrew right off.

    Hope this helps. This is not a very complicated repair.
     
  6. SkylineNZ

    SkylineNZ Member

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    Just what I was looking for. I'll give it a try this evening =)
     
  7. SkylineNZ

    SkylineNZ Member

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    Actually I'm in Pittsburgh. I'll post images of the repair once I get it done.
     
  8. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    Let me know how it turns out?

    Be gentle with it... It's soft aluminum.

    Where are you located.... NYC by any chance?... Otherwise I can do it for you.

    Oh BTW the block is on the outside so you tap from inside like taking dents out of a fender of a car. You can line the block with leather so it won't mar the finish any more than you have to.
     
  9. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    Great memorialize it so anyone with a similar repair can search it.

    Good luck tonight
     
  10. SkylineNZ

    SkylineNZ Member

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    I was thinking about wrapping the block in electrical tap. I think my biggest challenge will be finding the correct size block.

    I'll also have to inspect the rest of the locking ring when I get home - the last thing I want to do is bend something else when I go to straighten the original problem.
     
  11. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    Any block of wood will work, tape is good to keep it from scratching.

    Cut the radius n sand it a bit... The nicer the block the easier the job will be... And much more professional looking.

    This also works on filter rings.