Mamiya RB67 and water

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by Darkroom317, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

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    My tripod turned over while I was calculating the exposure and my camera went into the water. The waist level finder is smashed and the focusing screen does not look to be in good shape either. Worse, however, is that my polarizer is cracked, bent and will not turn nor come off the lens. Any idea how I can get the filter off and how much damage we are likely talking about from the water, mainly in the lens. :sad:
     
  2. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

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    Also, any idea as to my film? Is it salvageable? It was Fuji Astia 100F. I wound it through and then removed it. Only part of the paper is wet.
     
  3. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Really sorry to hear of the mishap. I would get it to a shop as soon as possible. There are electronic components here, there and everywhere. Me, being financially challenged would probably open everything up, place them in ziplocs with silica gel packs for 3-4 days in hopes that everything would dry out. But a shop can get it cleaned properly. Same with removing the lens so that others may be affixed once you get that one off. As to the film, just go for it and see what happens.
     
  4. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    There are no electronic parts in the RB bodies. (only a metering prism or powered back would have electronics, but even so, the camera body itself is not electronic) It is probably fine except for the screen and the polarizer as you mentioned. The polarizer can probably be removed with a dremel tool. The film is probably fine; who knows, maybe you will see 'creative effects.' I have dropped my RBs umpteen times and never had a problem. As far as water goes, just dump the fish out and let it dry out :wink: The lenses are well sealed, I doubt you got water in there. If you did then it may need to be opened up.
     
  5. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    What a bummer! Maybe KEH can fix it or least get busted parts replace. Hopefully the film is still ok.

    Jeff
     
  6. MVNelson

    MVNelson Member

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    RB67 are "tanks" . no electronics to worry about as mentioned. Get the thing opened to dry air. when you think it is dry carefully go in with a high quality compressed air. If it was salt water you have a bigger problem. I've gotten got into some heavy down pours before but I haven't had a full emersion?

    Good luck, my RB67 is my go to camera and I can imagine you pain .....

    Miles
     
  7. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

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    I found out what I saw was only water between the two parts of the screen. So it will be ok.
     
  8. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    I have the ProS and it's a tough camera, the projecting parts, lens, finder and knobs are the first to take the impact in a fall and since it was water and not concrete and you were there to pick it up right away I'd say that it should be just. There are no electronics in them so only mechanical function is the issue.
     
  9. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Put on dish washing gloves [rubber] and see if you can twist the filter off.

    OR

    Put a wide rubber band around the filter to twist it off.

    Steve
     
  10. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Crap. Sorry. Thinking M645j. No elecs. Righto.
     
  11. Perry Way

    Perry Way Member

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    I might be tempted to put the lens in an oven at about 200 degrees for a few minutes and only a few minutes. And then see if the filter will come off at that point. But only after trying the thing Sirius mentioned with the rubber band and that not working.
     
  12. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    Fresh water is not a problem. Remove the focusing screen, lens, back n prism, dry whatever you can with a paper towel. If your oven has a pilot light in it (aprox 100°F)... Extend the bellows all the way out and put the camera (body, backs opened and prism (battery removed)) in there for a day or overnight till it dries out. Since the camera is mechanical there is nothing to harm aside from silt or dirt in the water it was immersed in. If all works, you're good to go. If not, it will need a CLA.

    The focusing screen is easy enough to take appart if it is one with a couple layers. Wash everything with filtered water and pat dry, don't wipe if it has a fresnel lens or you will imbed dirt in the lens.

    The prism may have a meter and may suffer damage from the fall not the water. Dry it out with the camera in the oven but remove the battery. Once it is dry try it out. If it;'s not working, well buy that hand held meter you've been eyeing for years.

    Now the lens... the filter can be removed by taking out the glass, then cutting the ring to twist it out of the front of the lens. Does the lens rim have damage as well? Can you see any water in the lens? Does it still fire?
     
  13. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

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    It was the standard finder so thankfully no meter. I was checking my hand held meter when this happened. There is water in the lens but the shutter still fires. The lens ring has no damage. There is silt in the camera in the area behind the light baffle.
     
  14. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I'd definitely have the lens CLA'd (moisture in the shutter and aperture) and would recommend the same for the body.

    Matt
     
  15. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    Which lens is this? Where do you see the water?

    Slit behind the light baffle? What light baffle are you talking about?
     
  16. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

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    50mm 4.5 C with the floating element. The water appears to be on the rear element and another element within the lens. The silt is in the area that is behind the mirror in the body.
     
  17. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    To free the filter, you might try pressing the filter into the sidewall on your automobile tire, then giving a good twist while the filter is pressed against the tire. I've freed many lenses and filter that way.

    I'd try rinsing the body with distilled water to see if the silt would come out.

    I'd check the price of a CLA on the lens against what another lens costs.
    juan
     
  18. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    Taking the rear cell off will give tyou access to the inside surfaces. See if that gets to the water? The rear cell unscrews out like a light bulb. The front cell is a bit more complicated to remove.

    The silt behind the mirror can be dabbed out with a paper towel, a q-tip, split a sharp end on the q-tip wooden stick n pick it out, blow it out with come canned air.

    Hopefully none of the water n silt got inside through the mirror control slot. OPening up the camera would be the way to go then, mauybe a good thing since the internal seals on most RBs have never been changed since they were new.

    See how it all works after it's dried out, then decide if it needs to go into the shop or DIY.
     
  19. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

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    I sent it into my local camera shop. Everything works fine. The roll for the most part is ok. However one of the better frames has backing paper stuck to it.
     
  20. mhcfires

    mhcfires Subscriber

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    50mm 4.5 C with the floating element. The water appears to be on the rear element and another element within the lens. The silt is in the area that is behind the mirror in the body.

    Didn't float, huh? I dropped my Topcon RE Super into the drink and it went right to the bottom :sad:. I had it CLA'd and it was fine for the next 25 years. Glad there wasn't too much damage. Murphy's law insists that the best frames will be the ones most damaged. :sad:
     
  21. Bosaiya

    Bosaiya Member

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    But then that will make them even better, they will transcend "best" and become legendary. Anyone can make a great photo (at least once in a while) but only a very few exceptional photos will actually have a story behind them.

    Show me an excellent photograph and I will nod politely and try not to yawn. Show me a photo which is poorly composed, out-of-focus, badly scratched and ragged around the edges but has a story behind it and you have my attention.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 10, 2009
  22. unclemack

    unclemack Member

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    Hi, glad things are not as bad as they could have been.

    It would be a good idea to inspect your glass periodically for mould though, especially after a spell of damp weather - bellows and other parts can hold countless spores and they could affect any of your lenses from now on. Catching it early is crucial.

    Your repairer will have treated what he could reach with fungicide but it just isn't possible to cover everywhere spores can settle.

    It's good policy to check your glass frequently anyway - even without a dunking - spores are all around us, all the time, just waiting to get you.

    Don't have nightmares...

    And Happy Holidays!