Mamiya TLR Portrait Lens

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Bighead, Mar 16, 2005.

  1. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    Whats a good lens for portraits... Is 105mm to wide? I like the idea of this lens because its a little faster and cheaper. I can get a "black" one for $150.

    Should I go a step up to a 135mm, 180mm???
     
  2. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    I always thought the 80mm was the 'standard' portrait lens... What kind of look are you going for?
     
  3. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    I think 70 - 80 is ideal for 35mm, but an 80 for Medium Format is more like a 50 in 35mm.... So I've heard..

    By that rationale, the 105 should be something like a 75 in 35mm, which is pretty good... And with a F3.5, I can get that nice shallow DOF. The 135mm for the Mamiya, bumps it to a F4.5...
     
  4. r-brian

    r-brian Member

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    I think the 105mm is a little short for a portrait lens, especially if you will be doing head and shoulder shots. The classic lens for 6x6, Hasselblad, etc., is 150mm. For my Bronica, I have a 150mm but the 180mm is used alot with the 200mm used by some. I think the 105mm is closer to a 65mm equiv. in 35mm, a little short. In 35mm, the portrait lens range usually is 85mm - 135mm. I'd look for something from 135mm to 180mm. The DOF of 135mm @ f4.5 will be close to the DOF of 105mm @ f3.5. The 105mm might be fine for waist up portraits.

    Brian
     
  5. Brac

    Brac Member

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    When I used to take head & shoulder portraits with my Mamiya C220 I always found the 135mm Mamiya lens ideal. The standard 80mm lens is really too wide for this and the 105mm was sold as an alternative "standard" so probably wouldn't be a great deal different. You could use the 180mm but I think you would find you would have to move the camera back quite a bit from the sitter and this isn't always feasible.
     
  6. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    My vote is for 135 or 180, depends on the area you have to work with. I use the 135, great lens for this type of shot. tim
     
  7. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    Thanks for the info guys. I was afraid the 105 would be a little short...... Anyone got one for sale!!!
     
  8. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    While it may not be the optimal focal length for portraits, the 105mm lens is a fantastic lens. You certainly would not be disappointed with it.
     
  9. Scott Edwards

    Scott Edwards Member

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    I have always found the 80mm to be the perfect lens for portraiture because of its lovely bokeh when shot wide open. I have also used the 180 for tight head shots, but I still favor the 80. At f2.8 the 80 lens is quite a bit softer than at other apertures and is just perfect for portraiture. I haven't seen any images that look anything like 'wide' with this lens.
     
  10. AndrewH

    AndrewH Member

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    180 SUPER

    I had the 180 Super and loved it.
     
  11. grahamp

    grahamp Subscriber

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    The 135mm is probably the best portait lens in the TLR selection. Long enough for tight head shots without exaggerating features, and short enough for domestic spaces. It makes a useful two-lens pair with the 65mm for general photography.

    However, I find the 180mm is a better general purpose long lens. If portraits are your thing, go for the 135mm. If it is going to be too short for a lot of things, decide where you want to compromise (or get both).

    The 135mm has a quirk that disturbs some people - the shutter is mounted behind the optical elements, and the blades are exposed.
     
  12. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    I think you're right - my bad!
     
  13. Scott Edwards

    Scott Edwards Member

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    Yes, I love this lens also. It really shines when doing portraits that you wish to have that candid look. It can be sharp as a razor, or pleasingly soft when backing off on the focus ever so slightly.
     
  14. Blighty

    Blighty Subscriber

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    I'd go for the 135mm f4.5. It's a good lens. Strangely enough (and typically Mamiya) the diaphragm is behind the lens elements, so careful when you handle one! :smile: BLIGHTY.
     
  15. fparnold

    fparnold Member

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    I've been shooting a lot with a 180 (chrome), and I like how the results, but for indoor work it does require a lot of room. On the other hand, i've been doing head-sized objects in a standard dining room (60's split-ranch), without feeling that I was had my back to the wall.

    The only other consideration would be what lens you already have. If you're doing the occasional portrait, and already have the 80, then the 180 gets you a little over x2 in focal length, which may be more important for when you want a long lens in other settings.
     
  16. dr bob

    dr bob Member

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    I use every lens made by Seikor for my Mamiya C330f and the 135 is definitely my choice for portraits. However, the 109, as stated above, is a fine lens too and does about as well - especially for outdoor stuff. Be aware though, the 135's shutter is not between the lens elements, it is exposed at the rear.
     
  17. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    Go for the 105 and don't back off so far. Good for head AND shoulders
    AND seated. With the faster lens AND working closer you'll have good
    depth of field control.
    Later close in with the 135. I used the 180 for seated, Outdoors. Dan
     
  18. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    The DOF: you should have added, at the same subject to lens
    distance. BUT the 105mm will be used closer AND has the
    faster lens. We all know how depth of field disappears
    as the lens nears the subject. Dan
     
  19. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    Meaning what? You need to take care when swapping them out??

    To answer the other question, I have the 80mm. I seem to be doing an abundant amount of portraits and will be doing some table tob stuff... Love how close you can get with these TLR's....
     
  20. dr bob

    dr bob Member

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    Yes, of course. Several individuals have expressed surprise at this design feature. It is rather unusual.

    [/QUOTE]To answer the other question, I have the 80mm. I seem to be doing an abundant amount of portraits and will be doing some table tob stuff... Love how close you can get with these TLR's....[/QUOTE]

    Your 80mm will focus to 35.4 cm from the film plane, the 105 58.4, and the 135 90.2mm. The 80mm is usually considered as equivalent to a 50 mm in 35mm work and will certainly produce a typical portrait if properly aligned to the subject. The 135mm lens will yield a portrait image with little perspective variations, thatÂ’s all
     
  21. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    I have one of these. A rear lens cap is pretty important. A case almost as much so. You need to protect the rear of any lens, but, you can clean rear glass if it gets dusty. Not so easy with rear shutter blades. A rear cap and case will keep it clean.

    cheers y'all
     
  22. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    Got a 135, black shutter for $113, shiiped off of ebay.........!!!!!!!
     
  23. bobfowler

    bobfowler Subscriber

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    When I was shooting C series TLR's, the 135 was my favorite portrait lens.
     
  24. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    I have the 135mm and 180mm lenses and have used them for about twenty years, I'm very keen on portraiture and if I could only have one it would be the 135mm I love it, it produces such a natural perspective of the human features, whereas the 180mm is very good for tight head shots or outdoors,but longer lenses do tend to flatten perspective.
     
  25. Marco Gilardetti

    Marco Gilardetti Member

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    As said above. I used the Super 180 in a portrait session and the results were OUTSTANDING (not because of me, of course. It was the lens...)