manual developing tank for 4x5

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by marko_trebusak, Jan 21, 2005.

  1. marko_trebusak

    marko_trebusak Member

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    I'm looking for a manual developing tank that can be used like tanks for developing 35 mm or 120 films. I don't have a darkroom, so it should be usable in daylight (load the holders in the dark, and then turn the lights on for souping). I was searching around and findthis. What do you think?

    Best regards
    Marko
     
  2. etriplett

    etriplett Member

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    You could try one of these too. I'm sure the B&H can get one for you.

    I've never used one, but it is an alternative to the system you're looking at.
     
  3. shinn

    shinn Member

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    Marko,

    I borrowed one of those a few months ago and I don't plan on giving it back. I've never used the pour spout thingy, just open it up to dump and fill.

    Very easy to use good for stand and semistand development as well. Weird to load at first though.

    Happy Days
    Mark
     
  4. roteague

    roteague Member

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    I've used one for several years and they are excellent; easy to load and process well. However, they are designed to be used with the Jobo processor, not as a stand alone. I haven't tried using a different type of rotating base for it, although I imagine you could try.
     
  5. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I have a friend who really likes the HP Combi Plan tank. I use an old stainless steel Nikor tank, and I believe that Jobo makes a similar type 4x5" inversion tank in plastic. Very few people seem to like the Yankee tanks, so I'd avoid those.
     
  6. papagene

    papagene Membership Council Council

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    I use the HP Combi Plan tank and like it. And I don't use the spout-thingy to pour chems into the tank. I pull of the lid off (in total darkness) and pour the chems in that way, which may not suit you because of no darkroom.
    But I do highly recommend this tank.

    gene
     
  7. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    I use Jobo 2500 type tanks and 2509N reels [I think that's the right model number] They work just fine on a motorbase. Or you can use them on a real Jobo machine. Or you could use them like a normal inversion tank. With inversion they take a lot more chemicals. I don't think Jobo even mentions this method with those tanks. OTOH it seems older 2500 tanks mentioned it on the side. At least they provided chemical volume numbers.

    One advantage of the 2500 is the same tank can do any film size up to 4x5. So if you have the roll film reels it's possible to process 35mm,120,220,127 [46mm],6x9,9x12 and 4x5. The roll film reels handle the roll film sizes. The sheet film reel handles the various sheet film sizes. You can also change to a print lid and use the same tank for prints. Or you can add an extension to a small [or big tank if you really need it] and process more film or bigger prints.

    It's nice to buy one thing and not be told you need to buy something totally different when you have different needs.
     
  8. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Evening, Marko,

    There have been a lot of previous APUG postings on the topic of sheet film developing. Taking the time to do a thorough search should give you a lot of information.

    Konical
     
  9. MikeS

    MikeS Member

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    I currently have a Nikor 4x5 tank/reel as well as the HP CombiPlan-T tank, as well as a Jobo 2561 tank with 2 reels. Of them my favorite is the Nikor tank/reel, followed by the Jobo if I use my unicolor base for constant agitation, I'll go with the Jobo tank/reels. For intermittent agitation I use the Nikor.

    The Combi-tank has one main advantage over the Nikor, it's still available new, while the Nikors are only available used, and used products can vary widely in condition. My first Nikor tank made me wonder why lots of folks say how wonderful they are, as it was hard to load, and hard to unload, but when I got my second one that was in much nicer shape I found out why they're so nice!

    -Mike
     
  10. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    Marko, you might also consider making some development tubes from a plumbing supply store's materials. They are just black plastic drain pipe with a cap on one end and a removable plug in the other. You would have to work in a blacked out bathroom or something similar at night to handle film, but these tubes give very even development, are cheap to make and are easy to use.

    Get some 40mm or 50mm inside diameter drain line and cut it into 150mm lengths. Then glue a cap on one end and find a screw in type of plug fitting for the other end, this lets you work in a lighted room once the film is loaded. A water bath is used to keep temperatures constant and the tubes just float and spin in the water.
     
  11. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    I found a Nikor that holds 12 4x5 sheets. It is just an evergrown 35. Takes 1 qt of liquid. Make sure you get the band to hold the sheets on the reel.

    Previously used a jobo as an inversion but it was much harder to load, took more solution, and only did 6 sheets.

    I also got a free set of two Arkay tanks and the water jacket from a kind neighbor. Arkay made me a third tank and an 8 sheet hangar rack for a bunch of money. But it is nice to know they are still around. The system works well. Also got a water jacket, hangar rack, and one tank for 20 sheets 4x5. I need two more tanks for it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 22, 2005
  12. Baxter Bradford

    Baxter Bradford Member

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    I was loaned a Nikor and had trouble with it scratching negs from the central portion of the cage. I bought the Combi tank and now successfully use this in daylight at the kitchen sink.
    It wasn't love at first sight, I have now learnt the quirks and am happy to report that I do get consistent, evenly processed results. I use 1 litre of chemical rather than the recommended 1200cc. It has been used for normal processing and using partial stand.

    I fill and empty through the top nozzle using the supplied funnel. This method evens up dev time somewhat. The tank takes 40-50s to fill and empty. Opening up the valve so that it almost detatches is risky, but speeds things up! Once the film is fixed, I remove the lid and fill/empty that way.
     
  13. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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  14. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

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    I've gone further that this with this concept. With a bit more work, you can pretty easily put a light trap into a second cap and use these as daylight fill tanks. The ones I have for 9x12 cm and 4x5 are made from 1 1/2" black ABS drain pipe, with matching caps; inside one cap is glued a piece of 1/8" thick black ABS sheet (mine is textured on one side, and the textured side is toward the filler), and a center drilled hole has a short length of gray PVC pipe (attached with transition cement, specifically for connecting ABS to PVC) which in turn has a PVC cap. I've tested these tanks, they are completely light tight, and though they require six ounces of developer for each sheet, when you work with high dilutions as I routinely do, or use a reusable developer such as Diafine, that requirement isn't a big problem. With a little additional work, it would be possible to build a core onto the other cap that would reduce the liquid capacity, possibly to as little as two ounces per sheet.

    Oh, and I don't glue either cap on -- they're adquately liquid tight with just a friction fit, and the entire unit is much easier to keep clean if it comes apart.