Matts for prints

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by largeformat pat, Oct 30, 2009.

  1. largeformat pat

    largeformat pat Member

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    Hi,
    Can somebody please explain the different methods of matts for framing prints. I've heard of one method is to leave the actual edges of the print visable. I have done a quick google and had no real luck.
    Thanks
    Pat
     
  2. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    Lots of previous posts on this. here is a quick search results:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/search.php?searchid=5530988

    Check several of the promising threads -- should get you all the info you need.

    Vaughn

    PS...I usually mat as you described. I like the clean look of seeing the image's edges, rather than having a cut window define those edges.
     
  3. John Jarosz

    John Jarosz Member

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    Hooray! A man after my own heart. My opinion as well.
     
  4. tony lockerbie

    tony lockerbie Subscriber

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    Hi Pat, in my other life I am a framer, and the method of matting depends on the photographer in question. I would mat equally with the edges showing, to mats covering the photo itself, a matter of personal choice.
    For my personal work, I usually mat to cover the edges of the print, except when the print is from 35mm, when I print the black borders and allow them to show. I know this is considered passe these days, but I still like it so I don't care.
    Some photographers like the black core board for their mats, particularly for high key prints, others like double white mats etc. etc. So you can see that it very much a personal preference, so if you like some of the paper white showing, go for it.
    Looks like you are shooting 5x4, if so, printing the edges of the negative can look very effective, and shows that you are not using digital. Mind you, I saw some publicity shots the other day, printed like proofs with the sprocket holes and film ID all included, nice B&W's, but the film was Fuji RDP.....guess they grabbed the wrong program!
     
  5. hec

    hec Member

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    if I remember correctly, reading an interview, George Tice said he had this type of matting on his photographs, he didn't want anyone but him setting the edges of his images.