Maybe an obvious question..1-0 1-1

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by ToddB, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. ToddB

    ToddB Member

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    OK.. developing instructions has developing strengths labeled like this.. 1-0 and 1-1.

    I'm I understanding correctly..? 1-0 meaning half strength with more time, and 1-1 full strength with less time? I should mentions, that I've never had an issue but was curious and I tend to over process instructions.

    ToddB
     
  2. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    1-0 means full streangth, ratio of developer to water. 1-1 means half strength, equal parts developer and water.
     
  3. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I think you have it reversed, but I'm not sure I recognize those sorts of instructions.

    The two types I see a lot are 1+1 or 1:1.

    The former is clear, and refers to stock plus the same quantity of water.

    The second can cause confusion - does it mean 1 part stock in 1 part working solution (i.e. just stock) or does it mean the same as 1+1 (working solution is 1 part stock plus 1 part water).

    Another way of designating undiluted stock would be 1+0.

    The undiluted developer will require more (correction: less) time than the diluted developer.
     
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  4. ToddB

    ToddB Member

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    I've been doing it 1+1, never had a issue, but recently confused on the other ratio.

    Todd
     
  5. ToddB

    ToddB Member

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    1-0 means full streangth, ratio of developer to water.

    Ok.. I use D-76 powder and I obviously mix it water as per instructions.. So I'm correct by developing film 1+1 ratio?

    Todd
     
  6. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Do you mean 1+0 and 1+1?

    I'm accustomed to seeing developing strengths as ratios of stock solution - water.

    So 1-1 , 1+1 or 1:1 would be one part developer, one part water (half strength).

    1-0 would indicate 1 part developer, zero parts water (full strength).

    A good clue would be to check the times given for the different concentrations of the same developer and film/EI

    If you see 1-0 is 6 minutes and 1-1 is 9 minutes, it's a safe bet the 6 minute time is full-strength.
     
  7. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Lots of answers in a short time, everybody's right...
     
  8. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    When you make up your developer, you pour the powder into water, do some stirring, and then top of the volume with more water.

    That gives you a quantity of developer "stock", which you can use over time to develop a number of rolls of film.

    With D-76, many people use that stock undiluted - I would describe that as using it "stock" or 1+0.

    Others prefer to use a diluted version. So immediately before developing the film, they mix some developer stock with more water.

    If they choose to use their D-76 one part stock plus one part water, they describe that as using 1+1.

    If they choose to use their D-76 one part stock plus two parts water, they describe that as using 1+2.

    If they choose to use their D-76 one part stock plus three parts water, they describe that as using 1+3.

    etc.
     
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  9. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Yes. After you have the stock solution mixed according to the package... THEN you mix as much as you need at 1 to 1 (and dump that when done processing because it's only good for one-shot ... unless you want to add 15% developing time for the second run - practically nobody uses D-76 1:1 twice except in emergencies or by mistake).
     
  10. ToddB

    ToddB Member

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    Yes.. I pour powder and top off with water making a gallon of stock. sounds like I was correct. Undiluted sounds interesting.. however I'll stick with I'm used to, thanks for the clarfication.

    ToddB
     
  11. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    no this is backwards. Diluted takes longer.
     
  12. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Oops - polyglot has it right. Thanks!

    I've added a correction to the original post.
     
  13. Tony-S

    Tony-S Member

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    I hate that Kodak used the colon. The plus, which Ilford uses, is unambiguous. The colon is not.
     
  14. momus

    momus Member

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    This often gets me confused too, and it's really nutty that something so simple somehow got so fuzzy. In my mind, it should be "full strength", then 1+1, 1+2, etc for the dilutions. That makes more sense to me.
     
  15. ToddB

    ToddB Member

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    This often gets me confused too, and it's really nutty that something so simple somehow got so fuzzy. In my mind, it should be "full strength", then 1+1, 1+2, etc for the dilutions. That makes more sense to me.

    Exactly!!! Just recently I looked at developing time and solution, I questioned it. Thanks for the clarification from everyone.

    Todd​
     
  16. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Subscriber

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    I understand from a fomer thread that some chmists use the colon to mean something else. Kodak manuals almost always use 1:1 to mean One part stock solution to one part of water. Ilford instructions use 1+1 to mean the same thing.

    I don't think I have seen the 1+0 notation on any packages but it would mean one part stock to zero parts water - In other words no dilution.

    if you find the Kodak instuctions for D76 confusing, the Ilford instructions for ID-11 may be clearer, the two products are used the same. Ilfords version is mixed from Powder somewhat differently as it is packaged in more than one envelope. But the stock is generally equivalent to Kodak D76 stock.
     
  17. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    The Kodak instructions for use and mixing are almost invariably in very clear words. They tend to be accompanied, however by tables that use the 1:1 notation.
     
  18. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    I believe one of the main differences between using D-76 straight and using it diluted, is due to the silver solvent it and many other developers contain. When used diluted, the silver solvent is not as active relative to development time, thus negatives might be slightly grainer (more sharply defined grain), but also slightly sharper over-all.
     
  19. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Yes, softening/smoothing is the primary thing you can control via dilution on D76.