Metz battery confusion

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by karthik, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. karthik

    karthik Member

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    I got a used Metz 60 CT-4 from B&H, and I am confused as to what kind of battery it has in it. It is
    supposed to be a dryfit battery according to the item description on the invoice. But the battery
    compartment has the small metallic pin set to NiCd. the battery itself has nothing written on it (it
    has what looks like a serial number "AC257GK2" - but no other markings).

    I'd like to charge it, but don't want to damage it by using the wrong settings. How do I
    tell which kind of battery I really got?
     
  2. Andrew K

    Andrew K Subscriber

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    a dryfit battery is a nicad battery....it is probably a gray battery from memory.
     
  3. BainDarret

    BainDarret Subscriber

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    I had 2 60 CT-1 and a CT-2 flashes and probably bought a dozen replacement batteries over the years. I always bought the Dryfit batteries which I was told were a gelled electrolyte battery. Quite a different thing from a Ni-cad. Have you contacted B&H? They might be able to tell you what type of battery it is.
     
  4. Ralph Javins

    Ralph Javins Member

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    Good morning, Karthik;

    I agree with BainDarret who suggested that the Sonnheiser "Dryfit" battery is a Lead/Lead-Di-Oxide chemistry battery with a gelled electrolyte. It will not use the same charging algorythm as a liquid electrolyte Pb-PbO2 battery, but it is fairly close to it with the main difference being that the peak charging voltage and the float charging voltage will be a little lower with the "Dryfit." The Nickel-Cadmium charging algorythm is very different from either one of those other two. Please set the selector in the battery compartment to the correct battery chemistry, and use the correct charger intended for your model Metz flash.

    Most often, the batteries found with a Metz flash will be the Dryfit. They are a sealed battery.

    The optional Nikel-Cadmium battery normally will be clearly marked as being Ni-Cad. There have been some requirements for years in marking Ni-Cad batteries as such.

    The liquid electrolyte batteries will have a removable cap or caps for use in replenishing the water (use distilled water, H2O) to bring the electrolyte level back up to the required level AFTER the battery has been recharged. If the electrolyte level is below the top of the plates and grid structure visible inside the battery, add just enough water to bring the electrolyte level up to where it just covers the top of the plates before you recharge it. When fully recharged, then add additional water to bring the electrolyte level up to the top normal level. Normally, it is bad to let the electrolyte level drop to below the top of the plates. Probably you will not be able to fully reclaim or recover the full capacity of the battery if the plates have surface area that has been exposed to the oxygen in the atmosphere. This is one reason why liquid electrolyte batteries do not like to be tilted or laid over on their side.

    I have never seen a liquid electrolyte battery in a Metz flash in North America.

    I am not really familiar with the Metz 60 CT-4, but I do have and use five (5) Metz 60 CT-1.

    If you are in SouthWest British Columbia in Vancouver, there is a very active APUG group there, and over on Vancouver Island also.
     
  5. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Karthik:

    The predecessors to the 60 CT series flashes were the 202 and 402 flashes. They came standard with either a liquid electrolyte battery or a nickel cadmium battery. Unlike Ralph, I've had lots of use of liquid electrolyte batteries in those flashes. And the early power packs for the 60CT series flashes did have a switch position for them - labelled as lead acid if I recall correctly.

    When the Dryfit batteries became available for the 60CT series flashes it was very convenient because they would work with the power packs for the 402 and 202 flashes - as long as you didn't try to charge those batteries with those power packs.

    There is a third type of battery that some people are using, but Metz doesn't support. It is a lithium-ion battery. It cannot be charged in the Metz power pack or with the Metz wall plug chargers. It may be that you have one of them.

    EDIT: here is a link for one of the lithium-ion batteries: http://www.sabahoceanic.com/epages/...ObjectPath=/Shops/sabahoceanic/Products/A0116
     
  6. karthik

    karthik Member

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    Thanks very much for your responses!

    BainDarret: B&H stated that if they said it is a dryfit, then it is a dryfit. They couldn't provide any more information/confirmation over the phone.

    Ralph & Matt: The battery was not marked Nickel-Cadmium. And it didn't have any cap to replenish the electrolyte. So I took
    the chance that it was a dryfit as advertised, and set the metal pin to Dry instead of Nicd or Pb.

    It seems to have charged up OK. I left it overnight to charge and now it is working. While
    charging red and green lights were on initially, and by morning the red light had gone off (which I assumed to mean it was >80% done).
    I left the charger plugged in for about 6 hours more. I also cleaned the contacts
    on the battery and the holder with a cloth - they were a bit grimy.

    Recycle time is about 5 seconds after a flash discharge on full power.

    Once again - thanks very much for the help.

    --- Karthik