Milky unused fixer. No good?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by wildbill, Aug 9, 2005.

  1. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    I've got a gallon of arista oderless fixer that i opened and have been using for 11 months. I opened it today to see its got flaky stuff floating around and it's kinda milky. I filtered it then tried it on two sheets and it seems okay. I could replace it tomorrow. Should i hold off processing tonight or will it be okay?
     
  2. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    After using it for 11 months I would be very inclined to dispose of it and make new fixer.

    There is a test reagent available from Photographer's Formulary that will tell you about your fixer's condition.

    Fixing and washing are the two most important considerations to the archival qualities of your print.
     
  3. Gerald Koch

    Gerald Koch Member

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    With acid fixers it's a race against time as they are unstable. The sodium sulfite in them protects against sulfurization but is eventually used up. You might be able to squeeze another month or so out your fixer by adding a small amount of sodium sulfite to it, say about 15 grams per liter. However, if it has already seen heavy use and there is a lot of silver in it then is best to chuck it.
     
  4. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    This fixer isn't used. It's a one gallon container which i opened last year and have been using to dilute for films and paper. I don't reuse fixer.
     
  5. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    If that one gallon had been split into four quarts
    you may have had another eleven months. Dan