Minolta-16 frames per inch of film?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by DannL, Jul 9, 2009.

  1. DannL

    DannL Member

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    I just installed a cassette with 30" of film. I figure the first 3" was wasted in preparing the roll. How many exposures should I expect with the remaining 27" of film?

    To add: The counter on this camera only counts down from 20. I'll probably need to reset it occasionally when using long rolls.

    Thanks in advance. Dann
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2009
  2. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    I usually don't load that much and found it easier to just shoot by the counter. Otherwise there really is no way of knowing when you are at the end of a longer roll. I load around 2 feet of film. I'm using the 16-QT, so I only get 18 exposures. Personally, I'd never be able to keep track of how many times I re-set the counter.

    I picked up a trick from Minox film in that I use a hole punch to make a crescent punch in the edge of the film after loading the cassette. That way I can tell if a cassette is ready to go, or already exposed.
     
  3. DannL

    DannL Member

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    Thanks for the tip on notching the film.

    The anxiety was too overwhelming. I pulled the film early and developed what was there. The frame spacing frame to frame then, is 17mm. Giving about 40 exposures to the 27" of film. That will work perfect, having only to reset the counter once. 30" inches of 16mm wide film (+/- 1mm) is what I get when I split 120 film into four equal strips. I like how this is all working out mathematically.
     
  4. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    Having a piece of wood with 2 notchings at the right distance helps too, a kind of measuring stick.

    Peter
     
  5. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    Ok, so you are splitting 120 film, that make sense. I have a 100' roll of HP5 negative super 16 so I snip off what I need and I have about 6 cassettes.

    Which camera are you using?

    I have the Jobo 16mm reels and they work great for processing.

    I used to use 16mm SS reels and found they loaded easier if loaded with reverse curl (emulsion out).
     
  6. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    Thanks for the tip, ic-racer, I am planning to shoot some with my Minolta 16 in september, I will remember: emulsion out.

    Peter
     
  7. DannL

    DannL Member

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    Another tip: Don't rub your fingers over the film splitter in the dark! Oh, the horror! :sad:

    This round I'm testing the Minolta-16 (version I). I just received the EE II and am trying to exercise the evil spirits from the shutter. I have the Minolta-16II on order which is supossedly new/unused. I really need the extra shutter speeds.

    I found a tank in storage that had several reels that adjust down to 16mm. It worked fine, but I'm going to remove those silly ball-bearings that they put it the start of the reel. They make loading difficult.
     
  8. DannL

    DannL Member

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    The first roll of film (fortepan 200) was 3 inches longer than the Delta 100 that I just split. Based on the new numbers, I calculate we're only going to get a measly 140 exposures from a roll of Delta 120 film. And just to think, half of that film area is wasted in unexposed border space. So sad. :D
     
  9. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    I have the Minolta 16 with shutterspeeds from 1/500 - 1/30 and B. Bought it new at one time.
    I use 16mm movie film in it, so I don't a filmsplitter.

    I allso have a black Edixa 16 MB with lightmeter that takes 16mm Rollei film. It has shutterspeeds from 1/150 - 1/30 + B.

    For delevoping I have a stainless steel real that fits into a standard SS 35/120 tank and I have a special enlarger lens with
    negative holder for this format, so I am pretty complete with it.

    Nice little toy's ..........

    Peter
     
  10. DannL

    DannL Member

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    That I believe, is the Minolta that I have on order. Maybe it will arrive today.

    I seem to have more fun making photography related gizmos, than actually taking pictures. Making a splitter is really easy. You can then use any type film that comes in the 120 format. I understand that some 16mm cameras require a perforation to operate properly. The Minolta works fine without them. The splitter that Goathill sells is probably hundreds of times better than what I've made here. I used parquet wood flooring. Two pieces together, a razor blade, two more pieces, another razor, etc, etc. Then I added two wood side-rails. I'm sure it will evolve over time.

    http://www.subclub.org/sponsors/goathil2.htm

    .
     
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