Minolta SR-T Dilemma

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by Hal, Aug 30, 2010.

  1. Hal

    Hal Member

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    Hi APUG,

    Just hoping for some advice on a dilemma I'm facing; on Saturday, after much searching, I finally found what seemed to me the perfect camera for my own "1 camera, 1 lens, 1 film, 1 year" project (starting mid-September when I head to university). It was a nearly pristine SR-T 101 and came with a metal-barreled 55m f1.7 lens. Everything seems smooth and works as it should, including the meter.

    Now, the problem; I find it more difficult than I expected to focus using the microprism in medium to dim indoor lighting. The potential cure, which I discovered today, is an SR-T 303b (202 in America), for sale at the local camera shop for €15, which has a split-image rangefinder (and aperture read-out in the viewfinder) but a non-functioning meter; how difficult is exposure without a meter (anyone have any good online resources)? I know that many people work this way, but if it takes a long time to learn then I'm not sure I feel like spending several months (or more) out of my year learning how and losing shots in the mean-time.

    If anyone has any opinion on this, I'd be glad to hear it.
     
  2. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Focus back and forth quickly and you will find the right spot much faster.

    Steve
     
  3. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Actually, I think Steve may have gotten one right for once. Look, you'll be focusing wide open and shooting perhaps a little opened up in most of those conditions, anyway. The DOF should make any very slight focal errors more than acceptable, right?
     
  4. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Chris, how would you like to be drop kicked through the uprights?
     
  5. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    (Arms upright)
     
  6. Lee L

    Lee L Member

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  7. dehk

    dehk Member

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  8. altair

    altair Member

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    Stop relying on in-camera meters and get a handheld meter, you'll be much happier that way, plus your exposures will be better. I was told this when I first started out, didnt pay it no mind then. But now I know its true. So, get the 202. If not, the 101 will be just fine. It just takes time and practice.
     
  9. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    I would keep the SRT-101. At the least try shooting a roll with a microprism and with a split-image screen - you may find you like the microprism after all.

    The best things to focus on with a microprism are specular reflections, areas of large texture or high-contrast demarcations. Move the camera back and forth slightly while focusing - if the image is out of focus it will sparkle/break-up, if it is in focus it will remain steady.

    The best screen combines a split-image with a microprism. If I have to live with only one I prefer a microprism. A split-image screen invariably has the prism in the wrong orientation - some screens have the prism at 45 degrees but this isn't a panacea.

    As far as metering is concerned it is a good idea to have a working behind-the-lens meter. You can always use a hand-held meter if you want. A behind the lens meter is very, very useful - that's why all modern SLR's have them.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 31, 2010
  10. BobD

    BobD Member

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    Just get a hand held meter.
     
  11. fotch

    fotch Member

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    While I prefer a hand held meter, I would only want a fully working camera. Like owning an auto without lights or maybe no reverse, why would you want to invest in junk. Its not worth fixing either. Find a working example that has all its functions, there are plenty of them out there, unless your in a camera dessert.
     
  12. Rol_Lei Nut

    Rol_Lei Nut Member

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    While a hand-held meter has many advantages and is quite easy to use (at least basically - Zone system readings are another ballgame), I find that them fiddly and slower to use than a built-in meter.

    It's an extra piece of equipment you have to carry, store, take out and protect, which kind of defeats a light & fast 1 camera + 1 lens concept.

    If you're working slowly and methodically (and maybe with a tripod), a hand-hled meter can be brilliant.
     
  13. Wade D

    Wade D Member

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    Keep the 101 and just start using it. It will be easy to focus in no time at all with practice.
     
  14. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Meters are not slow, only photographers that use them are.:laugh:

    There are so many variables and different goals in getting the photo that I cannot say its faster or slower, it depends. I have found that metering through the lens is far more likely to meter on the wrong thing. It takes more time to be careful. Taking extra shots to cover yourself may result in larger quantity of poor photos. Yet, in a fast action shoot, may be the only way.

    On the other hand, taking the time to compose, focus, get exposure readings, set up lights or reflectors (if applicable), is most assuredly the way to work if you can. It just depends on what your trying to achieve, there is no one best way to do anything.