Moose versus plain Polarizer Filter?

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by Nick Zentena, Apr 10, 2006.

  1. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    Is there any reason not to get the Moose? The prices are pretty close and in some cases the Moose is cheaper. The 81a won't make that much of a difference will it? With negative film will I even notice it?
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I guess the question is whether you always like to use a warming filter with a polarizer. I think the effect of an 81a filter is usually noticable with color slide film, but I don't shoot a lot of color neg. If you have two separate filters, you can choose, but if you always find yourself using them together (i.e., if you like the "Outdoor Photography" look), then it makes sense to use the combo filter.
     
  3. mark

    mark Member

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    I only use my Moose polarizors. I have no idea where my regular nonwarming one is. I find the difference to be very noticable in neg and tranny
     
  4. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    I'm a little suprised it's so noticable with negative film. :surprised: I ordered one from some guy on Ebay now. If it's too strong I can get a smaller plain one later but I'd like two avoid buying to bigger polarizers.
     
  5. mark

    mark Member

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    I see the difference because I deal with some serious shadows out here in the morning and evening. I did comparison shots when I got the moose and saw the difference. yes the biggest difference is with Transparency film.
     
  6. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    If you're shooting at altitude in general, you might want a warming filter all the time in any case, so there are good reasons for it. Shade and overcast conditions call for a warming filter as well.
     
  7. KenM

    KenM Member

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    I only know one kind of moose, and it ain't something you put on a camera :D

    Is a 'Moose' a brand of a type of filter?? Help me out here....
     
  8. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Member

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    3 kinds of Moose !

    We have three kinds of moose here in New Brunswick. The antlered kind,the bottled kind (best ale in Canada) and a filter by Moose Paterson. Here's the web site Ken: www.moose395.net

    Mike
     
  9. KenM

    KenM Member

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    Sorry, I'll stick with the rock in a bottle - Big Rock, that is :D

    Thanks for the link - it's all good now.

     
  10. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Though I have never used a Moose warm polarizer, I have used a Tiffen Warm Polarizer, and at present I use Singh Ray Warm Polarizing filters.

    I shoot fairly exclusively on transparency material, particularly Velvia and Provia 100. From my experience regular polarizing filters though they will add color back to a scene, they tend to be a bit cool and to have a bit of a blue cast which is particularly noticed in the shadow areas. The beauty of these filters is that they add the color back and they warm up the scene a little as well.

    I have basically retired my regular polarizing filters for color transparency shooting- that includes my B&W and Heliopan polarizing filters.

    I have also retired my Tiffen Warm Polarizer for most applications. I use the Singh Ray warm polarizing filters. They tend to allow more light through the filter, have less light loss, and tend to be sharper than even my B&W and Heliopan polarizing filters.

    Singh Ray has a new Lighter Brighter Warm Polarizing filter that allows even more light through the filter with less light loss. I am saving up for this in the Cokin P Holder size so that I can use the filter with most of my lenses. I could use this filter with lenses with filter thread sizes of 40.5mm to 82mm. This will allow me to use the filter on all but 2 of my Leica R series lenses as well as all my 4" x 5" lenses (will also work on my Mamiya 7II lenses, but I had Singh Ray replace the glass in the special Mamiya polarizing filter for the camera).

    By the way the Singh Ray Polarizing filters are glass and not resin. They are however expensive.

    Rich
     
  11. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    In the area I do most of my shooting, I always have a warming filter on the lens, and yes, it does make a difference on print film, my warming filter has become as standard as my UV filters used to be...I have heard good things about the Moose, and am going to get a couple in different sizes to cover the lenses I shoot.

    Dave
     
  12. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Dave,

    Take a look at my comments about the new Singh Ray Lighter Brighter Warm Polarizer in the previous post. If you can use the Cokin P Holder (the P size Singh Ray Warm Polarizer will fit the circular slot at the back of the holder) this same filter (glass) can be used with a tremendous number of filter thread sizes with the proper adapters. This may prove as or more economical and lighter than buying multiple Moose filters. Additionally these Singh Ray filters will have less light loss particularly useful for those of us focusing through large format (particularly f6.8 and f9.0) lenses.

    Rich
     
  13. anthroboi

    anthroboi Member

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    Great thread. I was just going to post a question about polarizers and warming filters. If you haven't caught my other post, I'm going to Antigua & Barbuda for a month and I'm bringing my Canon EOS 300 (Rebel 2000), a warming filter and a circular polarizer. I'm planning on stacking the filter and polarizer, as I'm just using the kit lens (35mm-80mm). Will this be okay, without worrying about vignetting? Also, I've read in a few websites that I should stop up (?) in order to let in enough light (the recommendation varies from place to place). But if I'm using the above camera and using the TTL metering, do I need to worry about this or can I just adjust the exposure so that the meter is in the middle?

    Please forgive my lack of technical knowledge, I'm still learning about photography and although I did a fair bit of reading and research several months ago, I need to re-read everything :smile: My brain can only hold so much at once, and until exams are over, it's all anthropology I'm afraid.

    D-
     
  14. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Hi,

    Bob Singh (Singh Ray) says to put the Polarizing filter closest to the film plane. Put the warming filter on the outside of the Polarizing filter. The inboard meter should read through the filters. However, I normally and many other photographers will reduce the polarization a bit from maximum to avoid an almost steel blue sky.

    Rich
     
  15. roteague

    roteague Member

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    I haven't used the Moose filters. I primarily use a Tiffen Warm Polarizer, but I am considering a replacement for it - I need an 86mm filter.
     
  16. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Hi Robert,

    Ouch. What lens are you using that requires an 86mm thread? The only thing that I would have would be if I would use my Heliopan Center ND filter on my Rodenstock f6.8 90mm Grandagon N MC lens (the only exception if I get it repaired would be 112mm thread size for my Leica R f2.8 Apo Telyt).

    Rich
     
  17. roteague

    roteague Member

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    It's for my Schneider 3b Center Filter, which I use on my Schneider 80mm XL.
     
  18. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Hi Robert,

    Same problem as me. But, at least for the time being I am not sure if I want to use them together. Also, according to Bob Singh, the Polarizer is supposed to go closest to the film plane of all the filters. So I am not sure what to do then using a Center ND filter.

    Also, check my posting in this thread about the new Singh Ray Lighter Brighter Warm Polarizer in a Cokin P size will fit the rear slot on a Cokin P Holder and with the right adapter rings fit filter thread sizes to 82mm.

    Rich
     
  19. roteague

    roteague Member

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    Hi Rich,

    That is the same thing that Schneider says about the center filter - place it closest to the lens. I've got an el-cheapo polarizer that fits it now, but I haven't used it more than once or twice - 3 1/2 stops is a lot of light to loose. Like you, I am on the fence about using this combination.

    One other option is to use the Lee 105mm polarizer and an 81A. Nice thing about the Lee holder is you can easily take off all the slots except one, if you choose; the polarizing filters fits on the outside of the holder. But, the only one who sells this filter that I am aware of is Robert White in the UK.
     
  20. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Hi Robert,

    I also have the Lee holder. By the way, I just went to the B&H website. They list 3 Polarizing filters to fit the holder:

    1) The circular 105mm Polarizer that you mentioned - $300
    2) Circular 4x4 Polarizer - $179.95
    3) Linear 4x4 Polarizer- $159.95

    http://tinyurl.com/z9lf3

    Rich
     
  21. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    I'm curious, who makes his product? It's probably not something like Satin Snow, where Dave is directly involved in the production but more like Tiffen or Hoya doing a private label job for Moose.
     
  22. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    It's a Hoya product. Not even private label. It's Hoya all the way. The idea I guess came from Moose but it's made and sold by Hoya.