More ways to develop 70mm film. Film aprons! (applies to other film as well) [VIDEO]

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by djgeorgie, May 1, 2013.

  1. djgeorgie

    djgeorgie Member

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qh7Y32lLlCE

    Along with my stash of 10 70mm film reels, I have a couple 116 film developing aprons. Using them with modern day tanks works out very well.

    You can get odd sized film aprons from old Kodacraft film developing tanks. Easily found on ebay for $10. Other sizes were made.

    There is a seller selling new 35mm film aprons on ebay, calling them "film lasagna". Maybe he could do a 70mm version?




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  2. Shalom

    Shalom Member

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    He won't. I asked him already.

     
  3. djgeorgie

    djgeorgie Member

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    Damn :sad:
     
  4. Denverdad

    Denverdad Subscriber

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    It seems we are on a parallel course regarding 116 film development. For me the interest is in developing old rolls of found film, which often include the 116/616 format. Having been less than satisfied with an old vintage tank system that will do 116/616, as well as a more modern Paterson system I modified to accommodate it, I have lately been searching for a stainless steel reel in that size. But the old lasagna aprons are a possibility I hadn't even thought of! They appear to be very easy to load - something which is very important to me due to the rather strong "set" that very old rolls tend to have and which tends to make them much more fiddly to load.

    Unfortunately, the aprons seem to be as hard to find as the SS reels in this size. But at least I have one more option to be on the lookout for. So thanks!

    Jeff
     
  5. NedL

    NedL Subscriber

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    I'm thinking about getting a roll of 90mm FP4+, which is probably close enough to 122 to use in my Kodak 3A, but I'm not sure how I'd develop it. Even the idea of threading 116 onto a spool sounds hard ( although, honestly, I never have any problem at all with 120 and sometimes struggle with 135.... ) I'm sort of afraid to try "dip and dunk" with a photograph that I care a lot about!
     
  6. mhcfires

    mhcfires Subscriber

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    I developed a few rolls of VP122 by the see-saw method. Made quite a mess, but the film had been somewhat fogged and I wasn't happy with the outcome. I just can't justify a long roll of FP4+, I would rather spend the money on 46mm long rolls. I have SS reels for that size film. (baby Yashica)
     
  7. NedL

    NedL Subscriber

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    I've been slightly cutting down sheets of 4x5. You don't get that nice 122 aspect, but it's easy to develop them one at a time. Maybe I'll stick with that for now!
     
  8. gleaf

    gleaf Subscriber

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    Working out the fabrication details for aprons in custom length and width. Plastic film stock is on the way. A month or two of weekends between home and honey do's and I'll know if I am insane or merely nuts to have made the attempt. If it works for 120 then....
     
  9. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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