most used filters for B&W?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by stradibarrius, Oct 13, 2009.

  1. stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

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    What filter are the most useful for B&W, red, orange, green, blue???????
     
  2. dpurdy

    dpurdy Subscriber

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    I like the orange best.
    Dennis
     
  3. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

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    Red and orange.
     
  4. Jimi and Jim and Janis

    Jimi and Jim and Janis Member

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    It depends on a few factors. I believe the best filters for B&W are Yellow, Orange and Red, it just depends on which one you want. Yellow allows more light but doesnt create as much contrast as Red but of course Red gives you less light entering the film.
     
  5. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Subscriber

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    I like to use both a polarizer and orange filter. Sometimes I use them together.
     
  6. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Polarizer, orange, red are the most commonly used.

    Yellow, green and blue rarely used.

    Steve
     
  7. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member

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    I use medium yellow and orange the most.
     
  8. jgjbowen

    jgjbowen Member

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    yellow #12 and polarizer
     
  9. Ian David

    Ian David Member

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    This is my experience too. Sometimes neutral density filters also
     
  10. tom_bw

    tom_bw Member

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    Yellow for the most part, Red for fun. Film can make a bit of a difference - TMY2 is quite close with no filter to many films with a yellow filter (from what I find) due to less blue sensitivity.
     
  11. 36cm2

    36cm2 Member

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    Filter use really depends on the particular subject and lighting, but generally I use dark yellow and yellow-green for increased contrast (red is too much in my opinion). I also use a polarizer in glare situations and a 6-stop neutral density filter for slowing water.
     
  12. pnance

    pnance Member

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    Yellow or orange. Using a yellow filter improves your lens with b&w film. Makes it more apochromatic, only one color
     
  13. DannL

    DannL Member

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    A 3-1/2 Kodak Polycontrast filter.
     
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  15. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    A medium yellow filter (Wratten 8 or equivalent) is probably the most useful. It controls the sky nicely. I've found that a yellow-green (Wratten 11 or equivalent, not real green) is very useful with foliage. In my part of the country (dessert, red rocks) and orange filter is quite useful. Red filters don't get used that much, but they are needed sometimes in contrast situations and when really dramatic skies are called for. Blue is definitely only for very special uses, generally commercial and industrial contrast situations. You can us a blue filter to imitate the old, non-color sensitive films.
     
  16. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    Yellow-green for me. Then orange, sometimes red, green, polarizer and yellow (the latter especially with snow pics).
     
  17. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    Blue doesn't get used often with outdoor photography as most people want to darken blue skies, not lighten them.

    However, blue (80B) does have a place with studio photod, especially male portraits. It makes skin get dark and that can look very rugged for male portraits.
     
  18. Alex Bishop-Thorpe

    Alex Bishop-Thorpe Member

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    Yellow, and red now and then. Orange is a good middle ground between red and yellow, of course.
     
  19. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    About the only filter I use is Green.

    Ian
     
  20. scottmj

    scottmj Member

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    I believe it really depends on what I consider the "SOUL" of your vision when capturing an image. I use mostly red, 06/09 nd & polarizer.
     
  21. JPD

    JPD Member

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    Light-yellow, yellow-green/light-green and orange.
     
  22. Martin Aislabie

    Martin Aislabie Subscriber

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    In descending order

    Yellow/Green
    Orange
    Medium Yellow
    Green
    Deep Yellow
    Polariser
    Red

    As "scottmj" says - it depends on your "soul" but also atmospheric conditions

    Under the watery skies of the UK, a Red has a significantly different effect than when shooting in the almost waterless atmosphere of say Arizona.

    A Deep Yellow filter in the beep blue cloudless skies of the American South West gives about the same effect as a Red filter in the clearest blue sky of the UK.

    It takes a while to re-calibrate your eye and brain

    Martin
     
  23. Slixtiesix

    Slixtiesix Subscriber

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    I agree on yellow, orange and red.
     
  24. eclarke

    eclarke Member

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    I wear a police gear belt which keeps my meter and my most used filtration immediately available. The filters are strong yellow, red, orange, 10 stop nd, 2- 6 stop nd, 4 stop nd, 2 stop nd, 1 stop nd...resin filters are 2 stop nd gradient, 4 stop nd gradient, strong red gradient, strong yellow gradient and strong orange gradient. I use them all....Evan Clarke
     
  25. martinsmith99

    martinsmith99 Member

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    I have recently bought red, orange and yellow filters for landscape work.

    What filter is recommended for female portraiture?
     
  26. Martin Aislabie

    Martin Aislabie Subscriber

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    Yellow is good for smoothing out skin blemishes – ideal for female portraiture

    You could even go as far as orange – but you would have to play with lipstick & make up colours to avoid an unintentional very washed out look

    Green or Blue eventuates skin irregularities – gives that rugged “male” look

    Martin