Motion film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by sbelyaev, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. sbelyaev

    sbelyaev Member

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    Has anyone tried to use motion film in still cameras? Kodak vision2 for example.
    How did you like the results?
     
  2. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    It's been done. This APUG thread covers the topic in some length. In the 1980s (plus and minus a bit), several commercial outfits sold "short ends" of motion picture film for still photographic use. I used some of that film at the time. My overall impression today is that it wasn't optimal for still use, and I wouldn't recommend it for that use today unless you want to experiment with materials that are a bit different for specific artistic purposes.
     
  3. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member

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    There were a couple of companies that used to package motion picture film, and you could mail it back for the processing. IDK if they are still in business, I think Seattle film works was one. Motion picture film uses a different development than normal color neg. In general, the average still shooter would see little or no benefit in shooting motion picture film over regular color neg. OTO, if you have a good amount of experience with it, it is exceedingly flexible.
     
  4. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    To the best of my knowledge, none of the photofinishers that used to respool motion picture film for still use still do so, although the last I heard, at least one (Dale Labs) would still process the film. To use motion picture films in a still camera today, you'd need to buy short ends (or a whole roll) and spool them yourself.
     
  5. Domin

    Domin Member

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    I've developed some rather dated kodak 5245 last week in tetenal c41 kit. Works fine, colors are quite normal, pleasantly neutral, great latitude. No special artistic effects. But mind that my typical color material is a cross processed slide and I've shot just a few rolls of normal color neg in whole life.

    It works in c41, but remjet is the problem. You can't run it through a minilab, you have to develop it yourself and scrape the remjet manually. I think hardly worth trouble in most cases.
     
  6. sbelyaev

    sbelyaev Member

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    Kodak vision2 250d is very inexpensive 0.15USD/foot. Processing at A&I is $15/roll.
    I'm just curious whether it is worth to try this film. (or similar films).
     
  7. quiver

    quiver Member

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    The question is how much do you value your time. If you process it yourself. It will take more time to do than doing C-41 just because of the remjet. Now the contrast will be off since the print materials for MP film is higher contrast than paper. I've only used the ECN-2 chemicals with it so I don't know if the contrast will be diffrent crossed in C-41. I do know that the lifespan of the dyes will be shorter if done in C-41. ECN-2 uses CD-3 wereas C-41 uses CD-4. I would imagine that it would have the same stability problems that cross processed slides would have.

    One possible fix for the contrast problem that comes to mind is to fix the film then bleach. You would then expose the film to a strong light source while on the reels then redevelope bleach then fix. It would increase the color saturation as well as the contrast. I haven't really tried it yet but given the properties of color film it should work. BTW you would need to use a rehalogenating bleach.
     
  8. Domin

    Domin Member

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    $15 for a normal 36exp roll, or some other roll? Because for $15 I can have a fresh roll of portra and processed it in a good lab. I suppose it's even cheaper there in US.
     
  9. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    A and I bought RGB color labs machinery and set it up last year. The prices are much higher than RBG's were but the set photographer demand for it isn't there anymore. We're lucky to have anyone that'll do it anywhere! They sell rolls of kodak and fuji stocks too. The latitude of the vision stocks is very wide and those films printed on paper have a nice look that's just different.
    bottom of the page........http://www.aandi.com/film_pro2.htm#mp
     
  10. Stephen Frizza

    Stephen Frizza Member

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    the user goldie in apug would be a good one to talk to in regards to motion film for stills.
     
  11. radiantdarkroom

    radiantdarkroom Member

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    I think there is a IN or IP film that doesn't have ramjet backing ASA 6, extremely fine grain. It may be special and you may have to order a 2,000ft roll. I'm working on film and was looking up different stocks used in post-production a month a ago.
     
  12. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Motion picture film is lower in contrast than any normal camera film and so it gives images that are not completely satisfactory unless printed properly. In addition, Vision needs a special process.

    PE
     
  13. radiantdarkroom

    radiantdarkroom Member

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    Okay I'm totally wrong, It's only in print film without ramjet. That's pretty useless for traditional looking color prints through analog printing. But there is a Ramjet backed IN film that you could use that is tungsten based ASA 6. Can't beat that for sharpness.
     
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  15. radiantdarkroom

    radiantdarkroom Member

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    I have shot Motion picture film through a still camera it was some Fuji stock. Don't have to worry about camera scratches on the base side. Cost's more to process than c-41 for such short lengths.
     
  16. Matt5791

    Matt5791 Subscriber

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    When I have purchesed Fuji MP film in the past from Fuji in London they have told me that they will package any emulsion of your choice into 35mm canisters for testing - this is what directors of photography will do - to get the full effect it has to be printed onto print film for projection. Process is ECN-2 - so you need a motion picture lab for this - and the printing.
     
  17. nick mulder

    nick mulder Member

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    A friend of mine has been throwing in 16mm vision2 stocks into her Holga for the fun of it - three strips next to each other... bit of a jumble in there with the lack of a pressure plate and the tension otherwise caused by the dark-felt-thingy-bit of a 35mm canister - worked out, convinced the local cine lab to process it for her - not sure what is happening with the prints though ...

    There's the new Vision3 also in case you hadn't heard :wink:
     
  18. ricksplace

    ricksplace Member

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    I managed to win two 400' rolls of Ilford FP4+ movie film a few years ago. About the only difference I can notice is the sprocket holes are slightly rounded. What would b&w negative film be used for in 35mm movie cameras?

    wtf is remjet?

    Rick.
     
  19. snaggs

    snaggs Member

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    Is motion picture film higher resolution? or is that just marketing blurb.

    Daniel.
     
  20. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Daniel;

    Motion picture film generally has higher latitude, more sharpness and finer grain than consumer films. This is usually due to the fact that the latest generation in technology goes into MoPic first before into still films due to the demands placed on it in terms of magnification. The latitude is required for making prints and for SFX, but the other factors relate to projected quality.

    Therefore the 2 electron sensitization went into Vision first. It is now used in Portra.

    PE
     
  21. sbelyaev

    sbelyaev Member

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    It would be interesting to know opinions of those who used to use vision or eterna films in still cameras. Kodak has very nice images on its website. I'm just not sure whether the results worth the troubles of finding and developing motion picture films.
     
  22. Photo Engineer

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    I'll repeat again that it also takes a place willing to print the film onto the proper print material. Endura type color paper will not work!

    PE
     
  23. sbelyaev

    sbelyaev Member

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    A&I will print these films on photo paper. (according to A&I website)
     
  24. Photo Engineer

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    They will most likely be low in contrast. I know of no easy way to increase the contrast. The values would be as follows: Normal film print = 0.6 film x 2.5 paper, Vision print = 0.5 film x 2.5 paper. (Color print film is over 3.0 in contrast for reference)

    PE
     
  25. Michael W

    Michael W Member

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    I bought some motion picture films from A&I in Hollywood when I was there in December. They had a good range of Fuji & Kodak neg & reversal. It´s all bulk loaded, no DX code & $5 a roll from memory. I want to try it just for the hell of it. With the choices of film narrowing in recent years I want to take advantage of any opportunity to try some film that I haven´t used before.

    Processing is $15 a roll ECN2 plus for extra they can scan to a CD or do prints. Processing takes a couple of weeks or longer I believe. Their website says 1 week but the woman I spoke to at their Santa Monica facility thought it would take a few weeks. I´ve only shot a couple of rolls & haven´t had any results back yet so can´t comment further. Probably most of the film I bought will end up being exposed back in Sydney & then be posted to A&I and back so it´ll be awhile before I know whether it will be worth taking any further, ie if i really like the look of one of the stocks.
     
  26. Photo Engineer

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    Scanning and correcting digitally is one method to fix up Vision contrast and make prints either on Endura or on a fully digital printer. I don't want to go there though!

    PE