mounting Cibachrome and other prints to acrylic/aluminium

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by MMfoto, Oct 16, 2004.

  1. MMfoto

    MMfoto Member

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    I'm searching for information regarding archival mounting of photographic prints to aluminium or acrylic. I'm aware of static-mounting to acrylic, and would like to know of other mounting techniques for these materials. Thanks.
     
  2. Joe Symchyshyn

    Joe Symchyshyn Member

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    I guess it depends on your idea of "archival".

    I've seen cold mounted cibachromes (like a big roll of double stick tape). Part of the problem was that the prints get a bit of an orange peel kinda look - bumpy and not dead flat.


    joe :smile:
     
  3. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    Hi MMfoto
    There are two methods of mounting to arcylic, either face mount or back mount., Cold mounting is the only way for cibachrome,
    One method is to use a clear silicone that adheres the print to the plexi, as the print and plexi go through the cold rollers the silicone is pressed or squeezed out as it travels through the mounter, much like spreading a bead of emulsion on paper.
    This method is sometimes preferred as the silicone catches any dust and travels the dust through the mount and eventually out.
    Another method is high grade clear adhesive which I believe Ilford, Mactac, Drytac and others have their variation.
    This method is generally for face mounting the cibachrome to the back of the clear plexi.

    Be warned , both methods require a spotless environment and a good technician. Most large commercial labs do both methods, but you should know that the lab takes no responsibility on damage or spots within the mount therefore you should be very aware of who is doing the job.

    When done properly the results are spectacular.

    I would be very interested as well in thoughts on alluminum mounting techniques, as I have a large personal project that I want to mount to aluminum.
     
  4. mlwues34

    mlwues34 Member

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    could you help me w/ r comment.

    Do you know anybody that does this in such good extremes as you say that can be done. mlwues34@aol.com ART 4 VETS
     
  5. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    I squirm when I think about the big risks of bonding Ilfochromes to either plastic or aluminium. It's not a 100% fail-safe method.
    Hot adhesive bonding to aluminium substrate; it's a specialist task usually known to high-end Ilfochrome-producing labs where galleries/exhibition spaces fancy the clean lines of the frameless look, or the photographer embraces the minimalist presentation. The trouble is that the finished print (itself, often with minute bubbles or creases as a risk of the process) cannot be protected against the elements that can stain it over time (e.g. with a surface spray), hence the stronger preference over aesthetics for conservation-grade framing, which does afford the print perpetual protection.
     
  6. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    Bob pretty much hit the nail on the head. He's a pro at this. Permanent cold-mount foils are the norm, but are utterly unforgiving. They can be used on a variety of smooth substrates. Some like Gatorbd require pre-sanding. Unless your print is small, you need a pressure roller system and some serious practice. Best done by a pro with a clean room. Acrylic is a poor backer choice because it changes dimensionally or bows with humidity cycles. Static mounting is an elegant technique for relativey small prints is you have a low-humidity work environment to begin with. I developed a proprietary hermetic face-mounting technique which differs from the others; but like them, it too was laborious and expensive.