Mystery Film to develop

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Jarvman, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

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    Hi all, a guy at my woodwork class gave me this film to process that he found in somebody's odds and ends. Could anyone advise me what sort of film it is and whether it will still be processable? Also possible times/dilutions etc...

    Many thanks, Gareth
     

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  2. Dr Croubie

    Dr Croubie Member

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    Given that it's Ilford, it's pretty much going to be Black and White, and almost anything will develop in a Rodinal stand. (whether there's anything on it above the base fog will be interesting). I've heard HC110 is good for cutting through fog on old films, but i've never used it...
     
  3. Fixcinater

    Fixcinater Subscriber

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    I just shot and souped the first roll out of a bulk Ilford roll, dated 1973. It's only labeled "Mk.V Film" for identification.

    5ml of HC110 + water to cover. 25c, 8 minutes. Looks quite good for something that old, not knowing anything about it's speed or any other characteristics.
     
  4. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    Just use what you have, no point in going out of your way to get a special developer just for one random roll. If you have HC110 id say go dilution B, and develop it warm and fast 75f and maybe 4-5min to really cut the fog. You can also try two bath developers that take out the timing aspect of it as well like diafine.
     
  5. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

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    This may be the long discontinued Ilford Selochrome film. I think it went off the production line perhaps 40 years ago. Google the Ilford company in Mobberley in Cheshire, and send them an E mail or speak to their tech department and ask their advice. They are usually very helpful
     
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  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    You'll have to see-saw the film through a tray of developer as it's larger than 120. I have the original dev times for all the old Ilford films and I'd suggest 12 mins in ID-11/D76 @ 20ºC, or whatever you'd use for FP4+ but increase the time by 25%. That works for older films,

    Ian
     
  7. Regular Rod

    Regular Rod Member

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    It's a roll of 116 not 120 I think. You will need to develop it with either a spaced out spiral to get the gap right, or in a big deep tray like a washing up bowl in which you can manually agitate the film through the developer without catching and scratching it on the bottom of the tray. Big film clips like the Patterson clips on each end may help you to lay it down on one edge, between agitations, without it spiralling out of control and being damaged. Of course if you have access to deep tanks you simply manipulate it in your usual way. If it was me I'd carefully unwind the film a little bit and use a rubber band on a rule to measure in the dark how wide the film was edge to edge. Then wind it back, tape it and put it safely on one side in a lightproof container. Then work out some way of spacing a spool (maybe with rubber bands on the shaft) at the right width for the film's dimensions and then develop it semi-stand (after a pre-soak in water) with a compensating developer and a generous amount of time. What developers do you have available?


    It would be good to see what you find on there...


    RR
     
  8. Bruce Robbins

    Bruce Robbins Member

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    Here's some good info on old Ilford products that might be interesting if not useful:
    http://www.photomemorabilia.co.uk/Ilford/Chronology.html

    A two bath developer is another way to go but stand development is probably easier and there are other developers aside from Rodinal you can use although it's likely the best for that purpose. Good luck with the film!
     
  9. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    yeah, it's 116 -- if you have an old Yankee reel tank that goes that wide (I have one!) you can do it that way, otherwise it's tray -- get it wet so it's easier to handle and then hold it so the reverse curl makes it hold a giant U shape and rock it back and forth in a tray or open tank for both dev and fix.

    lacking any hard data, if it's b/w (safe assumption) try d-76, 1:1 for 10 minutes and pray.
     
  10. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    D76 1+1 for 10 minutes will give under-development , all the old Ilford films needed 8½-10 minutes in Full Strength ID-11/D76 and you need to add a little extra time for older films as the contrast will have dropped slightly.

    Ian
     
  11. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

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    Thank you kindly for the advice everybody! Appreciated! Will have to try the tray method as Ian suggested. I don't have either ID-11 or D76. Well actually, I think I have D76 but I'm not touching a whole pack just for one film. I do have HC-110, XTOL and Ilford DD-X handy.
     
  12. Simon R Galley

    Simon R Galley Subscriber

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    Dear Jarvman,

    Please see Ian Grants post, he is spot on : ID11/D76 12 mins : We occasionally get films sent to us and this is the standard that we would use.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited
     
  13. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    If you don't have D76 available, Xtol yields very low fog. Use stock developer. I would try 10 minutes at 68 F / 20 C.
    The key is to try to lift the exposed values above the accumulated fog, and few developers develop shadows like Xtol does.

    More importantly - don't promise the film's owner anything results wise. There's always risk of unusable results from film this old, risk that is beyond your control.
     
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  15. snederhiser

    snederhiser Member

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    Hello;
    I would question if the film has been exposed yet? Notice the frame size on the roll and the masking tape. I think this information would only be printed on the unexposed end of the roll, Steven.
     
  16. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    hi jarvman ..

    do you have any dektol or ansco130?

    you might also consider 1:7 for about 8-9 minutes the same
    development method ian suggested, if you don't have d76/id11.

    have fun solving your mystery !

    john
     
  17. Regular Rod

    Regular Rod Member

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    Use the XTOL!


    RR
     
  18. Regular Rod

    Regular Rod Member

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    He will be able to tell in the darkroom or tent by unrolling the paper until he reaches the film. If it is attached with tape then it is unexposed, if it is free to flail about it is exposed. If he is going to measure it as suggested earlier he will ascertain any way whether it has been exposed or not. Personally with masking tape I'd guess it was exposed. The original would have had a paper tape round it.


    RR
     
  19. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

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    Cheers Simon. I wonder about development though, will 12 mins be alright if I'm sloshing it through a tray. Wouldn't that be the same as continual agitation? And yes, it says 'exposed' on the outer paper.
     
  20. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    12 minutes will be fine it's not in the developer continuously and you see-saw it gently.

    Ian
     
  21. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

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    By 'see-saw' you mean holding it by either end and rocking it back and fore in and out of the tray yeah?
     
  22. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Yes, it's easier than it sounds. A 10x8 dish is large enough.

    Ian
     
  23. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Subscriber

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    the see-saw method was once the standard for film that used a red safe-light. Once Pancro became the norm, folks switched to tanks. If you are sure it is 116 or 616, most of the old FR tanks will take it.

    they turn up cheep enough like this sample listing (Not mine and I don't know the seller) http://www.ebay.ca/itm/300901981528 (note the mention of 116 on the box.)
     
  24. Prof_Pixel

    Prof_Pixel Member

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    All this talk about tray developing film takes me back.... I got started in photography as a teenager about 60 years ago using the see-saw method of tray developing Verichrome (back in its ortho days) with a red safelight and MQ developer. (Remember the old Kodak Tri-Chem packs?)
     
  25. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    According to Mees & Sheppard "Verichrome" needed the same filter a Panchromatic emulsions a Wratten Series III because it was "Red sensitive" :D You must have been using a much later version :smile:

    Ian
     
  26. Prof_Pixel

    Prof_Pixel Member

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    The orthochromatic (non-red sensitive) version of Verichrome was available from 1931 to 1956. The panchromatic version (Verichrome Pan) came out in 1956.