Need 8x10 wide lens advice.

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by cameragearforyou, Dec 6, 2008.

  1. cameragearforyou

    cameragearforyou Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    hello all. i am new to 8x10 (came from 4x5 and mamiya 7ii). I bought an 1980s vintage deardorff with 5 lenses for 2300usd, and i have a selection of lenses that i will keep. But the 165mm schneider if way too heavy and will most likely sell.
    what i need help with i what are good wide lenses that are not too heavy for 8x10?

    thanks all!
     
  2. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    9,281
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2002
    Location:
    Bergen, Norw
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I assume that 165mm Schneider is a Super Angulon, since you find it too heavy?

    I use a 165mm Angulon, which however has a sligjt problem with 8x10 except at very small stops. It's really a 18x24cm lens. In the same series the 210mm Angulon is less wide, but provides plenty of coverage.
     
  3. jmcd

    jmcd Member

    Messages:
    715
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2002
    These two are nice wides for 8x10, and they are quite small.
    159mm (6-1/4") Wollensak
    9-1/2 Dagor
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,033
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The tiny WA Protar's are excellent, I have Ross version a 151mm f16, it's tiny and despite it's maximum aperture of f16 remarkably easy to focus, it has room for movements on 10x8. The Zeiss version is f18, other focal lenghts were available. Ross and Zeiss shared some technology/designs etc pre-WWI, the WA Protar is a Zeiss Patent design that uses technology licensed from Ross. Some are marked EWA.

    My Ross lens is a fraction maybe 1-2% of the weight of my 165mm SA :D

    Ian
     
  5. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,341
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2005
    Location:
    Dearborn,Mic
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The little Wolly is a lovely lens, and gives lots of performance for a small, inexpensive lens. But it doesn't offer much coverage beyond 8x10, and needs to be stopped down. But it IS very good in the field !

    I'm a big fan of the Series V (f/18) Protars, and they were made by Zeiss, Ross, Krauss, and Bausch and Lomb. Wonderful lenses.
    Downside of the f/18 series is that they are very small, too small for shutters besides Volute, and are pretty rare. But a ND filter and a lens cap will work almost everytime.

    Zeiss offered a Series IV (f.12.5) that was a little bigger and fit into a small shutter. They need to be stopped down, but are also extremely fine lenses.

    In the rarer-but-you-never-know-what-will-turn-up category are the Dallmeyer, Cooke, Hugo Meyer, there are some others that I can't remember !~

    You ought to be able to turn up some f/18 Protars if you need to.
     
  6. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

    Messages:
    4,679
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Location:
    Italia
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    How wide do you want?

    G-Claron 240mm

    Fuji-W 210mm
     
  7. Trevor Crone

    Trevor Crone Member

    Messages:
    547
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Location:
    SE.London
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    For 8x10 I use both a Rodenstock 240 Apo Sironar-S in Copal 3 shutter, large heavy lens but good coverage and a Schneider 150 Super Symmar XL in a Copal 0 shutter, for me a truly great lens with excellent coverage. Another large lens requiring 95mm filters. These are modern lenses at their finest but alas are not cheap, however coverage was my main priority with sharpness maintained right into the corners at max shift.
     
  8. bowzart

    bowzart Member

    Messages:
    1,221
    Joined:
    May 23, 2008
    Location:
    Anacortes, W
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    They work great with Packards.

    Here's what my "5x7" (about 135mm, I think) f/18 B&L Zeiss Protar will cover. The image was made on 11x14 film. You can see the vignette in the upper corners.

    There's an 85mm version that would do about the same thing on 8x10. I have one now, but I used the 11x14 for this image because I hadn't got the 85 by that time.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2008
  9. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,341
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2005
    Location:
    Dearborn,Mic
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Bowz !

    We're letting all the secrets out, shh !
     
  10. bowzart

    bowzart Member

    Messages:
    1,221
    Joined:
    May 23, 2008
    Location:
    Anacortes, W
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Ooooops! What was I thinking? I'm not ready to sell them just yet.
     
  11. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,047
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Location:
    Lehi, Utah
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    I use a Nikkor 120 (f/8 I believe) Which gives me about a 20mm on 35mm film type prespective. Small and sharp.
     
  12. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,341
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2005
    Location:
    Dearborn,Mic
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    A great lens on a Deardorff. Also a 150, fantastic. But the 150 is not so small.
    The 210 W is pretty useful, too.
     
  13. John Kasaian

    John Kasaian Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2002
    Perhaps a Nikon 120mm SW?
     
  14. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,047
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Location:
    Lehi, Utah
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    Excellent idea! :wink:
     
  15. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,033
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Mmmmh I've never seen so many WA Protars on Ebay :D

    I'm almost tempted to get another.

    Ian
     
  16. Don12x20

    Don12x20 Member

    Messages:
    236
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2006
    Location:
    Pacific Nort
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    Look for a Hypergon 80mm with fan (or even up through 135/150mm) for extreme wide angle on 8x10.

    Wisner made a 80mm version without fan...

    all are extremely small lenses....
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 9, 2008
  17. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,047
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Location:
    Lehi, Utah
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    A "fan" Don? I don't believe I know what that is.
     
  18. Don12x20

    Don12x20 Member

    Messages:
    236
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2006
    Location:
    Pacific Nort
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    The early hypergons had an air actuated fan that swung in over the lens to even the exposure
    take a look at http://www.phsc.ca/hypergon.html

    Its been over a decade since I sold my version of the 80mm with fan.

    Wisner built 85mm version without the fan.
     
  19. Softie

    Softie Member

    Messages:
    30
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2008
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Has anyone actually seen a Wisner Hypergon?

    Keep your 165mm Super Angulon. It's big, it's heavy, but you have it. The only comparable lens that is modern and comes in a shutter is the 150 SSXL, which is smaller but not so much smaller that it's worth trading up to.
     
  20. JLP

    JLP Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,610
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Another 8x10 wide angle that is worth looking for is the Cooke 158/6.5 VIIb most are in barrel but can be had in a #1 shutter. A bit rare but excelent small lens.

    jan
     
  21. Brickbird

    Brickbird Subscriber

    Messages:
    159
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    I have the 210 Angulon, 159 Wollensak, 210 Fuji W and a 250 Wide Field Ektar for my 8x10 Deardorff. The Angulon would be my choice but just above the Ektar. The Angulon works well on my 11x14 Deardorff also.