Need Help in Deciding About a Minolta XD11/XD7

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by FilmOnly, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. FilmOnly

    FilmOnly Member

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    I just love my XE-7, but I would like to have a Minolta body that offers a winder or motor. I have enjoyed using the XG-M, but would prefer a camera with a metal shutter. Thus, the XK and XD would seem to be my choices. The XK seems a bit bulky. Thus, I am considering an XD11/XD7. I have my eye on a fairly reasonably priced XD example. I have mixed feelings about an XD11/XD7 because of its viewfinder: it has a black panel (for the shutter speed) that creeps into the field of view. I sold two Pentax ZX-Ms because I did not like not being able to easily discern what is in the blacked-out area. Please let me know what you think in regard to this subject (especially those who are XD11/XD7 users).
     
  2. Wolfeye

    Wolfeye Subscriber

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    You have mixed desires here. You require a lightweight body and metal shutter, and the XD-11/7 are the only Minolta bodies that have that. They do not offer 100% viewfinder coverage so there will be some portion of the image you can not see when you take a picture. I own the XD-11 and several other Minolta bodies but none of the MD mount cameras have 100% viewfinders. If you want to see more of what's behind the side displays, try a Canon AE-1, non-program. You can see the aperture needle and behind it because it's on a transparent piece of plastic.
     
  3. M.A.Longmore

    M.A.Longmore Subscriber

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    Hi FilmOnly,

    I Also Love My XE-7, it's been with me 33 years, but in the 80' I thought
    I needed a lighter body, metal shutter, auto-winder also. So, I jumped on the XG-9 when it first came out thinking that the winder would set me free. Then I pounced on the XD-11 thinking it was the ultimate piece of Minolta machinery. I was very dissatified with both cameras, I sold the XD and gave away the XG.
    But, luckily I kept the winder, I eventually bought an X-700 but being so accustomed to the size and weight of the XE-7, it felt a bit flimsy. So I attached the winder to give it a bit more substance. I hardly ever use the winder though,
    I haven't put batteries in it since 1995, it's just makes it easier for
    me to handle the X-700. When I was younger, I thought that I needed a motor drive, 400mm lens, then a 500mm Mirror Lens. It sure looked real pretty, but they never served a real photographic purpose,

    I am still loving the XE-7, and it's soulmate the MD Rokkor-X 85mm F1.7 !
    The X-700 gets a little lovin' every once in awhile, with the Series 1, 70-210.

    I am still dreaming about the XK Motor.
    As APUG Subscriber, Christopher Walrath so eloquently stated :
    “ Welcome Back To Gear-Humping-Related Herniation. “


    Ron

    From The Long Island Of New York, and the
    Long Island @ Large Format Group, right here on APUG
    .
     
  4. Cork

    Cork Member

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    Different strokes for different folks. I love the XD-11, and one of the reasons is the bright viewfinder which makes the XD-11 one of the easiest-to-focus cameras I've tried. But I also like having all the exposure information displayed so I need not take my eye away from the viewfinder when changing settings. I generally don't miss the "lost" portion of the frame, and when that is a critical element for me I just use a professional body from a different system.

    I think you need to decide whether compact/less expensive is more important to you than the viewfinder issue. Good luck finding a reasonable cost XK, though. The X-700 is another option, of course, though I don't think it shows any higher percentage of the frame than the XD's. It's motor drive is quite nice and it also offers the TTL flash both the XE and XD lack . . .

    Rgds,
    Cork

    Edit: for what it's worth, I believe both the XE and XD cameras show the same percentage of the frame in the finder - 94%. Magnification is slightly higher in the XD, I think: 87% vs. 84% for the XE with 50mm lenses. Thus you would be giving up nothing in terms of viewfinder image with the XD series. cv
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 15, 2010
  5. flatulent1

    flatulent1 Subscriber

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    I hear the Maxxum 5 is very nice...
     
  6. FilmOnly

    FilmOnly Member

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    I am not looking for a 100% finder. I am looking for an unobstructed finder. The XD11's finder has a black bulge (with shutter speeds) that blocks out part of the field of view. People often misunderstand what I mean by this, and so I want to make sure I am clear on this point. To me, a 92% or 94% finder is good enough, as there is always some cropping in processing. I do not want a finder that unnecessarily (and foolishly) blocks out part of my picture. I will never understand why certain camera designs include an obstructed field of view. It does not make any sense, as exposure information can be easily displayed on the left, right, bottom, or top panel (as is the case with many cameras), without having to block out part of the field of view.
     
  7. Cork

    Cork Member

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    Don't buy an XD. You won't be happy with it, and the slight incursion into the fov will bother you every time you use the camera. Look for an XK instead.
     
  8. FilmOnly

    FilmOnly Member

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    Cork: I think you are right. I wish the price of an XK were more reasonable.

    I gather the XK has a match needle display? This is the display I prefer.
     
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  9. Wolfeye

    Wolfeye Subscriber

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    You said the XK was to heavy, bulky, fine. You said you wanted a metal shutter, also fine. You said you wanted a camera that wasn't bulky and had a metal shutter and an unobstructed (my bad, thinking you meant 100%) viewfinder and uses Minolta MD lenses. It does not exist. Like I said, try looking through a Canon AE-1 and tell me what you think of that approach.
     
  10. Cork

    Cork Member

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    The original AE finder for the XK was match-needle; I've never seen one of the later (more desirable) AE-S finders, so I can't comment on it. There might be some info on the Rokkor Files site, and I think the Photography in Malaysia site had some good info on the XK. If I recall correctly, the AE finder used the same meter as the SRT's, and the AE-S moved to the more responsive and accurate silicon meter of the XD. However, I'm certainly no expert so a bit of research prior to purchase would be in order. cv
     
  11. FilmOnly

    FilmOnly Member

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    I had said that I had thought the XK "a bit" bulky. Larger, heavier cameras are usually okay with me--within reason. I definitely do not like smaller, lighter cameras, but a Nikon F2 with a motor drive, for example, is just too huge and heavy (especially the drive, which looks like it is twice the size of the camera...and about as big as a small refrigerator). This is why I like the XE-7. It has some nice weight to it...but it lacks a drive or winder.

    With regard to the AE-1, I had one briefly, but did not like the flashing (and distracting) "M" for manual mode. The A-1's display is very nice, but I have yet to find an A-series (AE-1, A-1, AE-1P) shutter release that was not "sticky." I had to press down quite hard in order to release the shutter. It seemed to me that it could induce camera shake in hand-held shots.