need the facts on ektachrome 100d 35mm motion picture film as 'slide' film.

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Robert Liebermann, Mar 29, 2012.

  1. Robert Liebermann

    Robert Liebermann Member

    Messages:
    53
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Location:
    Fairbanks, A
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Embarrassed that I don't know this and a little spooked that extensive web/site searches can't tell me what I need to know...

    I couldn't find any useful info or examples on the web that were intended as 'straight' photography or motion picture stuff, so if anybody knows of any tests, reviews, or galleries I'd like to take a look at what one can do with this film.

    The question: does this film behave as a 'regular' e-6 film if used as a film for, say, natural light landscape stuff? Can I use it as I'd used EPP or whatever? Or is there some difference that'll make the colors off? Does it have the same perforations as 'still' 35mm film, so I can bulk load it and shoot as normal? Is the contrast similar? Are any filters required? Any weird masking or backing? Does it scan well?

    I'm not looking for super-technical comments as to the minutiae of grain, contrast, etc. of kodak vs. fuji or ektachrome vs. kodachrome or whatever (but feel free to post them, what the heck, everything's useful for later seekers). More interested in the suitability as such. Beggars can't be choosers anymore, that period of history's over.

    I just want to know if I can use this while it's still around. Like I did ~2004-2010 with kodachrome, I'm going to try to shoot any ektachrome while I can, but the prices on the 35mm rolled stuff are soon going to be prohibitive.

    Help, thanks!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 29, 2012
  2. wildbill

    wildbill Member

    Messages:
    2,851
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    motion picture perfs. yes, you should be able to use it in a still camera. filtration is the same when I've shot it. Will it be worth the trouble vs. buying fuji provia in cartridges? Probably not.
     
  3. Robert Liebermann

    Robert Liebermann Member

    Messages:
    53
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Location:
    Fairbanks, A
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks - are MP perfs the same as 35mm for 'regular' cameras? ... Filtration the same as what?
     
  4. McFortner

    McFortner Member

    Messages:
    403
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    Location:
    Stockbridge,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yes, the spacing is the same for movie and photo film. 35mm film cameras got their start from cameras made to use the left over unshot film from movies. There may be a slight difference in only that some movie films have a rounded sprocket ends (__) vs. photographic film with it's 90 degree ends [__], but it will not bother your 35mm cameras at all.
     
  5. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

    Messages:
    4,574
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Location:
    İstanbul
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Robert ,

    Motion Film Processing with homemix or lab order ECN2 developer widely discussed. I dont know but there can be a anti reflective black carbon layer could be used even at Motion Ektachrome film. I am not sure but lots of motion picture films uses it. If you want to process your film at home , you can remove it after expose and before development . But if you order a processing , this layer disturb your labs processor with a mess. In two cases , you must remove the layer. So before investment , search for the data sheets of that film at kodak com or private message , photo engineer at APUG.

    Good luck , I will search the threads and will help you with small list and I will look for the kodak data sheet.

    Umut
     
  6. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

    Messages:
    4,574
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Location:
    İstanbul
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Robert ,

    If I am not wrong , it comes in 300 meter roll.


    More information of the film is herebelow. I could not find information on antireflective coating is there or not with quick look. If nobody answers , its because of busy traffic so you must ask in other thread.


    http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploadedFiles/TI2496.pdf

    Some information on filtering is herebelow.

    Suggested Filters³
    Suggested Filter for Color Balance for Daylight Use None
    Suggested Neutral Density Filter .3 to .6
    ³ Suggested Neutral Density Filters are general suggestions for each film used in a "daylight" situation to help avoid overexposure of high-speed films and to support lens performance. All filters are not created the same, and you should be aware of its individual performance properties before using them.


    Read more:

    http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Products/Production/Color_Reversal_Films/5285.htm#recommended_filters_header#ixzz1qXsGlamV

    Umut
     
  7. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

    Messages:
    4,574
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Location:
    İstanbul
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 29, 2012
  8. MDR

    MDR Member

    Messages:
    1,411
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Location:
    Austria
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Ektachrome 100D is processed in Standard E6 chemicals and not ECN2 furthermore Ektachrome 100D does not have a Remjet backing so it can be be processed at home in E6. The perforation is different to still film B&H perforation (cine film) vs KS (Kodak perforation) (still film and Cine print film as well as Russian MP cameras) but since normal still cameras don't have a registration pin you shouldn't have any problems using it in your still camera

    Good Luck
    Dominik
     
  9. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

    Messages:
    4,574
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Location:
    İstanbul
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Thank you Dominik.
     
  10. Robert Liebermann

    Robert Liebermann Member

    Messages:
    53
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Location:
    Fairbanks, A
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hi Umut, Dominik et al. - thanks for the info. Esp. RE: the short-end sellers! Will have to look into that. So now I understand what remjet backing is; and this doesn't have it so even better.

    I looked at the Kodak datasheets earlier, but as it seems entirely directed at motion picture use I was unsure if any things I'd need to know - I understand 'still' film well, but know nothing of cinema films. I was aware it's e-6, of course, so that's an indicator.

    The last thing I'm unsure of, and this is a big part, is if the film would appear as 'daylight' slide film as I know it. The only web examples I could find seem to be people using damaged or 'cross-processed' uses, which is OK but not what I'm looking for (yet!).

    So if anybody can tell me something like 'yes, shoot landscapes in your SLR, metering and filtering as you would Ekatachrome pro 100 daylight, process as same, and you'll not be surprised' that's what I'm looking for (feel free to copy/paste, even, if it's true). Or, 'don't use it without a xxx filter and even then it'll have a lime green cast and b;a bla bla' would tell me to rethink this. I just need to know if there's something 'different' from other e6 film here.

    I might save up and buy one of those long rolls just to prepare for the inevitable... I guess I'd have to build some sort of modified bulk loader for that size roll...

    The thing that confuses me is, if this can be shot as 'slide' film, why I can't find anything about that use on the web.
     
  11. kb3lms

    kb3lms Subscriber

    Messages:
    872
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Location:
    Reading, PA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Hi Robert,

    I haven't used the Ektachrome but I am using 5207 250D movie negative film right now. If the film is listed as 100D, the 'D' stands for daylight. The other film I am starting to use is 5219 200T where the 'T' stands for Tungsten balance. So 100D would be a daylight balance film intended for outdoor use.

    WRT bulk loading, I have given up on the bulk loader path and just pull out a good arm's length of film off the spool in the darkroom, cut it and roll it into the cassette. It's just easier that way and you don't end up with an exposed tail at the end of the roll or scratches from the loader.

    I'd try and shoot as normal slide film and I would bet it would work just fine. The CN film works just like regular daylight negative film except the contrast is a little lower as CN films are intended for making positive film prints.

    The slightly different sprocket holes will not bother your camera one bit.

    -- Jason
     
  12. wildbill

    wildbill Member

    Messages:
    2,851
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Dude, its 100 speed daylight reversal film. No special filters needed. Shoot it as you would any other 100 speed e-6 film. Don't buy $1000 of it until you've sampled some.
     
  13. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,363
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Location:
    Mundelein, I
    Shooter:
    35mm
    It's very hard to find short ends of 100D. In fact it's getting harder to buy 100D at all - the only remaining 35mm size is the 400ft roll on a core. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that Kodak canned up a master roll of it for some cinematographers that were demanding it, and once those all get sold, there will be no more. It's still pretty popular with the 16mm and 8/super-8 crowd but I'm betting it's virtually unused by 35mm cinematographers these days.

    At $475 for 400 feet I considered it no bargain at all compared to buying normal still camera film from Kodak... but now that it's the only reversal film left maybe that price doesn't seem so bad. But grab it while you can, like I said I bet once the frozen supply at Kodak is gone, it's gone. (Movie film is not given an expiration date - it's assumed to be a short path from Kodak to the camera to the lab - so they can and will just keep selling it for however long it is until it's gone, if my theory is correct.)

    If you send it off to a lab for processing, you should make sure they are OK with this (from the data sheet ):

    Duncan
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 30, 2012
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,363
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Location:
    Mundelein, I
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I'm surprised it took 9 months...

    http://motion.kodak.com/motion/About/The_Storyboard/4294970514/index.htm

    Duncan
     
  16. stefan4u

    stefan4u Member

    Messages:
    154
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Shooter:
    35mm
    High Robert!

    This is an older thread, but if still of interest for you and assuming you can get your hands on a roll, buy one.

    First respool in complete Darkness with gloved hands to a smaller, bulk loader compatible roll at about 100 feet, freeze the “residual” main roll airtight sealed.

    So yes, shoot landscapes in your SLR, metering and filtering as you would Ektachrome pro 100 daylight, process as same, and you'll not be surprised
    This is valid with one exception, we are talking about a E100VS (vivid saturation). Good for Landscapes and everything that have a lot of blue color in, or need some extra punch, maybe not ideal for portraits. It`s not that deadly neutral as the ektachrome 100, pronouncing a bit more blue.

    Compare
    E100 http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/e27/e27.pdf
    E100VS http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/e163/e163.pdf
    100D http://www.zerelda.com/internationalfilm/technical_files/5285.pdf

    The 100D is / was virtually the same product as the E100VS, except the slightly different sprocket holes and different numbers/bar codes exposed to the border.

    Regards,
    Stefan
     
  17. destroya

    destroya Subscriber

    Messages:
    482
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    Location:
    Los Altos, california
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  18. nickrapak

    nickrapak Member

    Messages:
    751
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You are reading the thread correctly, but the film in your link is Super 8 film, not 35mm. 35mm E100D only comes in 400 foot rolls. The best way to order the 35mm is to call up Kodak at 800-621-3456. They have the cheapest prices, and ship directly to you.
     
  19. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,363
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Location:
    Mundelein, I
    Shooter:
    35mm
    And for completeness' sake, the catalog number you want to order is 8673741 which is Kodak 5285 in 35mmx400 ft roll. The price in the US is $475.73, plus shipping and taxes. And you might want to hurry, this is literally an offer that is "good while supplies last" !

    Duncan
     
  20. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,363
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Location:
    Mundelein, I
    Shooter:
    35mm
    My roll arrived today, just one day later, shipped out of Carol Stream (near Chicago)... so maybe they have more of the 35mm stuff on hand than I thought, if it's stocked at the regional movie film depots.

    Duncan
     
  21. wogster

    wogster Member

    Messages:
    1,267
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2008
    Location:
    Bruce Penins
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Or it means they have pushed it all out to the regional warehouses, to free up space in the central warehouse.
     
  22. silverhalides

    silverhalides Member

    Messages:
    9
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2012
    Location:
    Vancouver, B
    Shooter:
    35mm
    5285 is the same emulsion as S100S.

    Robert, I heard from a Kodak Motion Picture Rep. back in April that the last two master rolls of Ektachrome were divided between the stills and motion picture divisions. One master roll went to each, but they were from the same emulsion. As McFortner and MDR have pointed out above, the Bell & Howell
    perforations are only a problem if you are using a pin register system like the Wess mounts.
     
  23. destroya

    destroya Subscriber

    Messages:
    482
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    Location:
    Los Altos, california
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    im really tempted to order this. won $500 at my monthly poker tourney so i have the cash. but is it really practical? figure its about $6 per roll 36 exp which is $1 more then velvia. so is it worth it? I would love to have a larger stash of slide film before it gets to $20 per roll.
     
  24. nickrapak

    nickrapak Member

    Messages:
    751
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If you think you can use all 72 rolls worth within the time it takes to expire, and you like E100VS over Velvia, I say go for it. Assuming the 10% annual price increase that's typical anymore, that $6 roll will be $9.66 in 5 years.
     
  25. destroya

    destroya Subscriber

    Messages:
    482
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    Location:
    Los Altos, california
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    called Kodak. its all gone. so no more kodak slides for me, ever. what a shame -(
     
  26. Robert Liebermann

    Robert Liebermann Member

    Messages:
    53
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Location:
    Fairbanks, A
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks for all the discussion on this apparently now only of historical interest thread!

    Well, I bought the 400' roll back in the spring; it's still frozen in the can as I type... the guy had a second 400' roll at the time, which I was too poor to buy, and now I see it's discontinued and thus the 400' is probably all I'll get, though I emailed last week to ask (no reply yet). Will roll that up in the spring and shoot in interior Alaska and the Lake Superior country (in the fall). Will do this with even more reverence than my last Kodachrome...

    This film discontinuation is getting very hard to keep up with... I've got some of the Rollei c41 and e6 ordered and will try that a little too... I still miss Orwochrom...

    Good thing I've been pretty film-intensive for the last 30 years! I guess maybe one regret is I never got into motion picture stuff... Still like the ektar 100 and shooting as much of /that/ as I can while i can, but there's nothing like looking at your wet just developed 'chromes in full life-color.

    Shoot.