Need to by some more film - but which one?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Chris Harvey, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. Chris Harvey

    Chris Harvey Member

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    Hi folks, as the title says I need to buy some more film as my stock of FP4plus is almost finished. Ive been using this film for a while now in 120 format.

    I have settled on Rodindal at 1/100 dilution using the 60min stand technique (this works well form me on a number of counts and I would like to standardise on that method) I then scan on V500 Epson Perfection and play in Photoshop etc.

    I'm using two cameras, Bronica SQai and a pinhole (f90 and f270) the latter produces negs that are 110mm by 45mm on a curved back plate.

    Ok why change? Well I just think my images could be a little more punchy, with bit more character and a bit more wow! And the fridge needs restocking!

    What are your thoughts and as ive said i'd like to stick with Rodinal.

    Thanks in advance

    Chris
     
  2. Colin Corneau

    Colin Corneau Subscriber

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    PanF+ is pretty punchy and contrasty (I also use Rodinal but 1:50, FWIW)

    Perhaps try Ilford's Delta or TMX? I think you'll have at least as much effect on your final image by your choices in developing as you do in choices of film.
     
  3. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Tmax 400 is pretty nice. Very flexible and tendency to go higher contrast if uncontrolled.
    I like shooting Tmax400 by over-exposing a bit then under-develop to tame the contrast myself.
     
  4. Klainmeister

    Klainmeister Member

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    FP4 is tough to beat, but I can say that Acros 100 has a very distinct look--maybe a little cooler and more contrasty--that I enjoy. Pan-F is also lots of fun, although slower.

    What type of scenes are you shooting?
     
  5. segedi

    segedi Member

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    Acros also has very low reciprocity making it mice for pinhole work. I think you don't need correction until after 2 minute exposure.
     
  6. herb

    herb Subscriber

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    You have many options to get punchy shots- try 1:50 or even 1:25 with Rodinal. Probably shorten dev time with that, but definitely will get punch.

    also semi stand works for more contrast. Stand was developed to tame highlights, sounds like yours are getting too tame. I would do that before changing film.
     
  7. Klainmeister

    Klainmeister Member

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    Segedi is right--Acros has practically no reciprocity failure....on the data sheet it's something like 2 minutes, but I have tested it up to 15 minutes with only 1/2 compensation. Perfect for pinholes.
     
  8. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    The reason your negaives are lacking in "punch" is that you are using a development method that compresses the tonal scale of the negatives. Stand development is designed for use in contrasty lighting conditions. It is going to reduce the contrast of your negatives. STAND DEVELOPMENT WAS NEVER INTENDED AS A GENERAL PURPOSE DEVELOPING TECHNIQUE. Forgive the shout but this keeps being stated over and over again on APUG but no one seems to listen. You want more punch then try Rodinal at a lower dilution with normal agitation. At 1:25 your going to get your punch. Changing to another film is not going to help your problem.

    Reading up on the Zone System might be helpful to you. It describes techniques that can be very useful. These include. but are not limited to, stand and semi-stand development.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2011
  9. rince

    rince Subscriber

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    While I understand the comment of Gerald, I also understand that sometimes you just want to try something new. I personally like Acros 100 a lot, since I feel it has a nice tonal range and I particular like it for portraits. I am very new to developing my own film, but seeing how long it took me to get a result I like and how many rolls I had to go through until I feel comfortable to get the results I like, I guess you would have to go through the same to figure out how to develop a new film the way you want it.
     
  10. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    When I am trying a new film I first do everything by the book; box speed, standard developer, and standard development. Only then would I consider making small changes.

    Ansell Adams made a good point in his books. You first need to become completely familiar with your materials, whether it be a particular film, paper, or developer before you try a new one. The question becomes whether you wish to produce excellent photographs or do you wish to constantly experiment.

    I am not the only person to recommend first sticking with FP4+ and using a more concentrated solution of Rodinal. When you are satisfied with the results then try some other film. Don't try to change everything at once.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2011
  11. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    If you want WOW factor, Tmax 400 shot at half speed, developed in Rodinal 1+50. Forget stand development for anything but the most contrasty lighting conditions. Acros is another WOW film when exposed and developed properly. Lately I've been shooting Shanghai GP-3 film, I am adding it to my list of WOW films.
     
  12. Chris Harvey

    Chris Harvey Member

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    Dear All thanks for your helpful comments, Gerald thanks especially for your comments re the stand technique, I'm fairly new to Rodinal so that was helpful. Whilst there is lots written about this developer, this does mean its a bit of a mine field for a new user. I've decided I will move to Acros 100 so a good starting technique for Rodinal would be helpful.

    Thanks again

    Chris
     
  13. Smudger

    Smudger Member

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    Acros is well worth trying. It is my Go -To film in this speed range, and will withstand Rodinal very well. Its cost-effectiveness may well depend on where you buy it- but that should not be a prime factor.
    The Massive Developing Chart will provide you with some useful starting points, and its resistance to reciprocity failure is a big advantage. And,in my experience,the manufacturing quality is very good.
     
  14. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    I use FP4+ and HC110 Dilution "H" with good results.
    Chris you don't give your location, but if it's Australia please pm me.
     
  15. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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  16. Rolleijoe

    Rolleijoe Member

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    Sounds as though everyone is stuck "in the box". Time to think "outside the box" film-wise.

    My main films are any of the Rolleipan versions (each one fills a certain need). Also Efke 25, Foma 200, and the Efke IR820 looks amazing. Will be trying it out next.

    There's more to life than Kodak, Ilford, and Acros. Especially that horrible T-Mud film they've been churning out since '82!