Neg to Lab

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Ian, Jun 1, 2008.

  1. Ian

    Ian Member

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    As sheet film comes in one light tight bag, how would you recomend it be wraped for sending to a lab? As i would not be sending the whole 10 sheets at any one time.

    I did find a plastic bag company hear in the UK willing to provide the answer, light proof 500 micron black plastic bags, min order 3000 bags. Thats way to many bags and not a very cheep option:sad:.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. tim_walls

    tim_walls Member

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    I dev my own so I've got no direct experience, but I gather an old empty film box (complete with inner box and bag) is the done thing - of course, if you have then develop less than one box at a time you need them to send the box back for this to work!
     
  3. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Afternoon, Ian,

    Ordinarily, sheet film is sent to a lab in its original box or another one of the same size. Regardless of the box used, be sure to label as to film type (E-6 or C-41); proper labeling will save a lab technician the bother of having to read the notch code, although that will probably be quickly double-checked anyway. I have often sent color film in boxes which originally had B & W film in them; with correct labeling, that has never been a problem. 1 1/2 or 2 inch masking tape wrapped around the box gives an ample amount of space for writing name, film type, number of sheets inside, any special instructions, etc. A Sharpie pen writes well on the tape.

    Konical
     
  4. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I used to send film to labs in lightproof bags before I had enough boxes on hand, but I found that this occasionally resulted in errors, since it's not the way that most labs are used to receiving film. You could ask the lab if they have a few spare three-part boxes, or just ask here, and someone in the UK is likely to offer you a couple for the cost of postage. I just gave away four boxes to two people who made such requests.
     
  5. Michael W

    Michael W Member

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    I think it's a common practice to send the film still in the double dark film holders. That way you can note on each holder the film type & any special processing instructions. Put some thick rubber band around each double dark to prevent the dark slide from shifting.
     
  6. richard ide

    richard ide Member

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    I would never let another person handle a film holder. All you need is an idiot to screw one up. Although not likely in a lab but I would not take the chance.
     
  7. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    In New York the standard charge for "downloading" (yes, they really call it that and have called it that for years) film from filmholders is $1 a sheet, which I take as a discouragement. Aside from the fact that it's another thing to deal with, I'd assume the lab doesn't want to keep track of filmholders and deal with stacks of filmholders in the return bins.