New Fuji Stuff

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by roteague, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. roteague

    roteague Member

    Messages:
    6,671
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Location:
    Kaneohe, Haw
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    FUJIFILM HIGHLIGHTS NEW GENERATION OF PROFESSIONAL COLOR NEGATIVE FILM

    The new films will be available in summer 2005. They will replace the current Fujicolor Portrait Film NPS 160 and NPC 160.

    FUJIFILM INTRODUCES FUJICOLOR CRYSTAL ARCHIVE PAPER TYPE II

    Fujicolor Crystal Archive Paper Type II boasts improved handling characteristics, more vivid color reproduction, more brilliant whites and improved highlight detail and image stability.

    FUJIFILM INTRODUCES FUJICOLOR TRUE DEFINITION 400 FILM

    http://www.fujifilm.com/JSP/fuji/epartners/PMALandingPage.jsp
     
  2. Tom Duffy

    Tom Duffy Member

    Messages:
    963
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Thanks for bringing this to our attention.

    One comment: I'm not sure who the audience is for the True Definition 400 film. It comes only in three packs of 24 exp rolls, meaning no matter how good it is I'd stick to my 36 exp rolls of Portra 400 UC, which I think is the finest color negative film ever made (at least to date).
     
  3. Mongo

    Mongo Member

    Messages:
    960
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2004
    Location:
    Pittsburgh,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Anything that only comes as 3x24 is aimed squarely at the WalMart consumer. That's not to say it won't be a good film...just that they've decided where they intend to market it.
     
  4. eric

    eric Member

    Messages:
    1,586
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  5. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

    Messages:
    4,049
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Well as I never use 400 speed film in the course of business, it is really a moot point to me, but do have to add, the majority of film that is sold now a days is 24 exposure film, if I remember right, when I was working in the photoshop, over 85% of our film sales were 24 expsoure rolls of film and we were a pro shop and not a mass market store, and about 60% of our sales was ISO 200 film.

    Dave
     
  6. psvensson

    psvensson Member

    Messages:
    625
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Queens, NY
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Hard to believe they're cutting the graininess of NPC. That stuff is really fine!
     
  7. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    8,003
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Milan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I think NPC, NPS, NPL are all pretty fine grained and possibly finer grained than 160 VC and NC or at least similar. Reala is certainly finer grained and my initial usage of kodak's 100uc is finer and of course older discontinued films were finer still.

    I suspect that there is and has been for some time the technology to make finer grained colour films. There may not have been the efficiencies within the manufacturing process to justify it until now.
     
  8. Sino

    Sino Member

    Messages:
    166
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    Location:
    Chania, Gree
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Here the situation is exactly opposite to that: nearly 90% of color negative film sales is of 36 exposure films, and most of them are ISO/ASA 100 or 400. But hey, this is Greece... =)
     
  9. eatfrog

    eatfrog Member

    Messages:
    30
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Location:
    Lulea, Swede
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I work at a small minilab in Finland, and 90% of what we develop is 24 exp ISO 200/400.
    ie. 90% Kodak Gold/Ultra actually.

    /Henri
     
  10. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

    Messages:
    377
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    The news of an improved line of films from the Fuji company is music to my ears. However, I find particularly discouraging the claim that the new films are designed specifically with better scans in mind, along with the optimization of the new Crystal Archive II papers for laser printing. While digital is great and I make the occasional scan myself, shouldn't these new films be optimized for those who have staid the course and continued to use the analog processes? I'm worried that they've played around with the grain in such a way as to reduce acutance and sharpness to make for better scans at the expense of traditional printing or that things have gotten to such a point in the photo business that they have to upsell the digital integration of a product even with minimal improvements in this regard.

    My tuppence.
    ~Karl
     
  11. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

    Messages:
    377
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    The news of an improved line of films from the Fuji company is music to my ears. However, I find particularly discouraging the claim that the new films are designed specifically with better scans in mind, along with the optimization of the new Crystal Archive II papers for laser printing. While digital is great and I make the occasional scan myself, shouldn't these new films be optimized for those who have staid the course and continued to use the analog processes? I'm worried that they've played around with the grain in such a way as to reduce acutance and sharpness to make for better scans at the expense of traditional printing or that things have gotten to such a point in the photo business that they have to upsell the digital integration of a product even with minimal improvements in this regard.

    My tuppence.
    ~Karl
     
  12. mark

    mark Member

    Messages:
    5,267
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    If a business is going to stay in business it must keep up. Especially a big one like Fuji. If they were some little specialty shop then no they could afford to cater to those who have staid the course. My hope is that they considered the traditionalist as they made the changes toward scanning. By the way what does better for scanning mean?
     
  13. Woolliscroft

    Woolliscroft Member

    Messages:
    726
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I do use a lot of 400 speed film for air photography, but I can't remember ever buying a 24 exp film of anything. I rather miss the 72exp films Ilford used to do. I am also getting more and more trouble finding 220.

    David.
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

    Messages:
    377
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    I agree, but have the same concerns that you do, especially concerning Crystal Archive II. Then again, I'm a big Kodak guy myself, so this really doesn't impact me. Still, competition is good for business, and I hope that Kodak will follow suit by upgrading their line (while keeping the analog route in mind of course).

    Regards.
    ~Karl Borowski
     
  16. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

    Messages:
    377
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    How can you fit 72 pictures into a single spool of 35mm? I thought that anything above 40 was pushing it, let alone 72. Or was there some sort of slightly larger cassette that Ilford used?

    ~Karl
     
  17. Steve Roberts

    Steve Roberts Member

    Messages:
    1,149
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Location:
    Near Tavisto
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Or perhaps a much thinner film base?
    Steve
     
  18. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

    Messages:
    1,845
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Location:
    North Caroli
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The Ilford 72 exposure rolls were a thin base -- but there was still the major problem of finding a developing reel (or even a dip-and-dunk system) that could handle film that long (in a leader card or roller process C-41 system, it's not a big deal, of course). Also, some modern cameras may have problems if they don't sense end of film before about frame 40, but it doesn't matter much -- AFAIK, no one now makes a 35 mm film thin enough to put 72 exposures in a standard cassette.
     
  19. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

    Messages:
    4,518
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2002
    Location:
    Ipswich, Mas
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I just received what appears to be the last box of Ilfocolor Paper available from B&H. I ordered RA-4 developer, Tetenal Press Pak C41 Kits ... and - seeing the scant supply of Ilfocolor available, Fuji "Crystal Archive RA4" paper. The description of the Fuji papers was not very specific, so I choose CDII, (I think).

    I placed the order Monday, around noon, a tad worried, after reading about the "B&H Warehouse fire", - to be shipped "cheap" three day ground. The first shipment arrived Tuesday, shortly after noon(!!!), and an additional shipment "from a different warehouse", today, Thursday, at 11:00 AM. Faster than usual service. My fire - related fear appear to be groundless.

    Now... the Fuji paper ... Came in a cheap, Brown box, A foil package of paper, and ...*NO* data sheet of *any* kind, or any other literature. Nada!! Nothing except the label on the box. I visited the "Fujifilm" website ... The description of "Fuji Crystal Archive CDII" stated that it was expressly designed for "Digital Printing"... Nothing at all about film image printing. I searched for a "brochure" ... none available. Data sheet? ... None available. An e-mail address to inquire about what the heck was going on? ... also NONE! To reach Fuji Tech Support I'll either have to snail mail, FAX or telephone, none of which appeals to me.
    Has anyone here tried to print with Fuji Crystal Archive papers?

    I have *NO* idea of what is going to happen when I try to use this stuff. I'm fairly sure there will not be an explosion, so I'll look at my first exploration of this paper as an adventure. I'll keep everyone informed.

    That "Fujifilm"(?!?!?) web site is so strongly digitally biased, that it makes my eyes water.
     
  20. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

    Messages:
    4,677
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Location:
    Italia
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  21. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    8,003
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Milan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Ed,
    I think the label should be green (p) or Red (c) and have a C or P on it (I think you have the P). I was unaware that Fuji made a digital specific paper. I operate a digital imaging contraption that is geared to Fuji and we use CA 2 P (or Konica Digital which I think is the same paper, but can't prove it). This is the same paper the portrait and wedding photog's rave about when shooting NPS or NPH.

    The C paper is more similar to Ifocolor's paper in my opinion.
     
  22. L Gebhardt

    L Gebhardt Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,769
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Location:
    NH
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I picked up some Crystal Archive and found as Ed did that it doesn't have any documentation. It is also missing basic filtration settings on the box. The Kodak Endura paper has filtration and on the one and only box of it I have tried the filtration was essentially right on for Kodak films. Do you know if CA has a standard starting filtration pack, or do we need to do this with trial and error? Maybe it's so consistant they don't print it?
     
  23. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

    Messages:
    377
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    My fears have been confirmed. Well, Fuji made great paper, reversal and print, and then they dropped the reversal along with the Big K, and now they've ****ed up their print paper. I'm praying that Kodak won't follow suit again.

    ~Karl
     
  24. roteague

    roteague Member

    Messages:
    6,671
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Location:
    Kaneohe, Haw
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Here is what Fuji says about Crystal Archive Type-CDII Paper on their website (bold, my emphasis).

    "Designed for optimum performance from large digital printing systems, new Fujicolor Crystal Archive Professional Paper Type CD II produces bright, crisp commercial prints with unsurpassed color image stability from laser printers and other digital exposure systems, yet conventional exposure compatible. Ideal for meeting professional photographers' needs for exhibitors, advertising, and other commercial photo applications, this paper delivers rich tonal gradation, vivid color reproduction, exceptional sharpness, and unsurpassed color stability. "

    The paper is available in 50 or 100 sheet boxes, 8x10 to 30x40.

    Here is the PDF: http://www.fujifilm.com/JSP/fuji/epartners/bin/TypeCDIISS.pdf
     
  25. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

    Messages:
    4,518
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2002
    Location:
    Ipswich, Mas
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I've read that at their site. Doesn't provide a much information. I've just recalibrated the new Tetenal chemistry / Ilfocolor combination. My next step is "wringing out" the Fuji Crystal Archive. That will happen this morning.

    Stay tuned, gang.

    I've also ordered some of the "Utrafine" color paper and their chemistry. Awaiting shipment. That will be next.
     
  26. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

    Messages:
    377
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    Hey Ed, could you please let me know how the Ultrafine paper works out? I'm getting my own suppy of this sometime soon and I'd like to know how it compares to a more standard-issue paper such as Kodak Endura in terms of speed, color accuracy, and filter pack settings.

    ~Karl