New Jobo tank and reel

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Digidurst, Mar 11, 2005.

  1. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Hi all! I have just received a new Jobo 1520 tank and an extra reel to go with it to process 120 film. The reel has some sort of weird oily looking substance on it. I'm thinking a good wash is in order - what should I use to clean it?

    I have also heard that you shouldn't use PhotoFlo with these tanks??? Could some experienced soul explain why that's the case or is just a rumor? Any other tips for getting the most out of this tank?

    Thanks in advance :smile:
     
  2. clogz

    clogz Subscriber

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    For a good clean of reels, tanks and trays: household bleach followed by a good wash.

    Hans
     
  3. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    I don't know what the oily stuff is but it doesn't come off easy.

    Jobo claims photoflo builds up on the reels and causes loading problems.
     
  4. rjr

    rjr Member

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    It´s a leftover from production - the reels are probably made via injection die casting and this "grease" is used to separate the product from the cast.

    Give it a wash with some soap and hot water, followed by a rinse with hot water and the grease will be gone.

    Re wetting agent or stabilizer in tanks - I see not much trouble if you give the stuff a HOT wash just after the final bath, before letting it dry.

    This way the wetting agents will be washed off and formaldehyde from stabilizer will evaporate (instead of settling on the reels and intervening with your developer next time you use it).

    Before you use the new reels, check them carefully for ridges in the guiding rails - they are not uncommon with plastic reels. Remove them and film will load easily. If the reels squeaks there might be ridges on the core of the reels...

    After a few years of usage the tank will begin to leak - now it´s time to replace the red lid with a new one. It´s cheap (cost in Germany is 1,60EUR) and Mom´s good damask cloth on the table will be safe from Rodinal droplets or PcatHD stains. ,-)
     
  5. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear diquidurst,

    I use "Simple Green" to clean my darkroom equipment. Rinse well.

    The "Photo Flo" question is funny because I actually added it in the tank before I knew it was a bad idea. Lucky for me, it hasn't cost me any negatives, but no matter how much I rinse, I still get a bit of foam. Don't use it in your JOBO tank. I now immerse the negatives after removing them from the reels.

    Neal Wydra
     
  6. fhovie

    fhovie Subscriber

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    I have been using photoflow in my plastic tanks (including Jobo) for years. While the film is hanging to dry, I fill the tank with very hot water and swish the reel and repeat till there is no foam. - No buildup and the parts dry fast for the next roll.
     
  7. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Thanks for the info everyone - I appreciate it :smile:
     
  8. Fotohuis

    Fotohuis Member

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    When you store the Jobo, leave the red cap off and do not mount the top on the tank. This will prevent leakage for a long time. You can "regenerate" the red cap by putting it on hot water, put it on the tank and let it cool down. Mostly another two years without a leaking problem. In Germany it's cheap, in the Netherlands the spare parts are already doubled in price.

    The Jobo 1500 system is very good. I am using it on the automatic Heiland TAS film processor. The 1520 will allow 2X120 rolfilm on one reel with the Jobo clip in a minimum of 470 ml liquid. But 500 ml is also possible in the 1520 tank (easy calculation).

    Best regards,

    Robert
     
  9. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Thanks for the storage tips!

    Clip? What clip?

    500ml? May I ask why one might benefit from the extra liquid?
     
  10. Fotohuis

    Fotohuis Member

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    Each Jobo (1501) reel is suplied with a red clip. The first 120 rolfilm is spooled till the end of the reel. Then the clip is inserted through the reel. Then the second 120 rolfilm is spooled till it ends because the clip is preventing you will have an overlap of the two 120 rolfilms.

    Some developers needs a minimum of concentrate pro film. e.g. 10 ml. If you want a dillution of 1+49 the total endvolume will be 500 ml, which of course has to fit in the tankvolume.
    That's why it is easy to have also a Jobo 1540 tank (or 1510+1530 extension, it's the same) 1000 ml - 910 ml minimum -, not only if you want more capacity of films but also if you want to work on higher dillutions 1:100 for example.

    Typical developers for this kind of processing: Agfa Rodinal, Moersch Tanol (staining developer).

    Best regards,

    Robert

    http://www.FotohuisRoVo.nl
     
  11. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    I get it - thanks for the clarification :smile:
     
  12. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    Wash with soap and water before use.

    Keep Photo-plow and color stabiliser away from the reel. It will get sticky eventually and bleach will clean it some, but not completely.