New Lomography Orca 110 cartridge black & white film

Discussion in 'Product Availability' started by nexus757, May 16, 2012.

  1. nexus757

    nexus757 Member

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  2. phirehouse

    phirehouse Subscriber

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    Thank's for posting this.
     
  3. M.A.Longmore

    M.A.Longmore Subscriber

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    .
    Trying to think of a polite way to ask my nephew to
    give back the complete Pentax 110 SLR System, that
    I gave to him in 1995.

    Hopefully he didn't lose it during The Divorce ...

    Ron
    .
     
  4. Laurent

    Laurent Subscriber

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    Hummm... I just had a look at their site, and they say that there is no backing paper (so you have to count the frames yourself), does not block at the end of the cartridge and the last 4 frames might be fogged... At that price this seems a bit hard to accept (at least for me)

    I always dreamed of a Pentax auto 110, but not sure it would justify getting one now !
     
  5. nexus757

    nexus757 Member

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    I am accustomed already to slitting and reloading 110 cartridges with whatever film I want for my Pentax auto 100 and Minolta 110 Zoom--so I am also familiar with the issue of "keeping count" (i.e. no backing paper) as well as unloading in darkness. The one advantage this Lomo film appears to have is that it is properly sprocketed for all 110 film cameras, thus even lower end Pocket Instamatics that require the sprocket hole to cock the shutter can be used easily. If you are using one of these cameras, once the Lomo film runs out the shutter will not cock. So, in spite of it lacking the backing paper or a counter, you will know immediately when the film runs out. I also think if you load and remove the cartridge in very subdued light there should be little chance of fogging. But, of course, it would be far better if they did include the backing paper.
     
  6. brofkand

    brofkand Member

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    I'm sure they'll get backing paper soon enough. I wonder if this is a partnership with ADOX, since ADOX has been saying for a few years now they're working on 110?
     
  7. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    I ordered some just to try it. I do hope they get backing paper on it soon, though. The Adox site still says they're working on it. I presume this is from either China or the old eastern block countries. I'll know in a week or so.
    Maybe I'll unload in the darkroom or changing bag to avoid flashing the last few frames.
     
  8. nexus757

    nexus757 Member

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    I'm a bit spoiled at reloading my own 110 for under $2 a roll (slicing down bulk 35mm), but I'll probably order some too for fun. I just bought a Kodak Ektralite off ebay for 99 cents--seems like the perfect camera to try this out with.
     
  9. Steve Roberts

    Steve Roberts Member

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    As Laurent says, I'd expect something that was rather better for the price. This isn't much better than what I can do cutting down 35mm film (and I even load that with backing paper, though the frame numbers lose sync as without sprocket holes the amount of film advance in the Pentax Auto 110 is governed by the steadily increasing diameter of the take-up spool. However, the presence of sprocket holes in Lomo's product does allow its use in many other cameras. I'd prefer to buy, say, 5m of the uncut 110 film and worry about the backing paper myself.

    Steve
     
  10. kb3lms

    kb3lms Subscriber

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    Where do you get the backing paper? Do you know of a source for new backing paper (or a substitute) or are you recycling paper from previous 110 carts or 120 rolls? I have been fooling with 126 cameras/cartridges and was trying to figure out what to do as I do not have any actual 126 backing paper.

    -- Jason
     
  11. wblynch

    wblynch Member

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    You can make some backing paper by cutting down some 120 discards. But you would need a pattern.
     
  12. kb3lms

    kb3lms Subscriber

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    That's probably what I will do. I do have some lightweight black opaque construction paper that I think could also work as it seems about the same weight as the real backing paper but I'd have to find it in roll format.

    As far as a pattern, I did just win an *Bay auction for an Instamatic 104 with 2 126 cartridges (Kodakcolor II) and paid less than 5 dollars. The film itself is likely worthless but the carts and backing paper will be useful. There are also lots of 110 cameras out there with old film included, too. Many of these camera outfits appear to be unused, NIB.
     
  13. wblynch

    wblynch Member

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    I recently ran a 126 roll from 1983 and got pictures. Not great, but they did come out.

    I put a used flash cube on top of my K-104 to force the slower shutter speed and shot in daylight. Then I over developed the film by 30 seconds. DIY C-41 is fun.

    I now have 4 126 carts reloaded with fresh Portra 160nc, waiting to be used.

    I still can find color 110 film at camera swaps but it is getting scarce. New 110 and 126 would be amazing.
     
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  15. Steve Roberts

    Steve Roberts Member

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    I've just used the backing paper from 110 carts. I have a few very outdated 110 films and cannibalised them, dumped the film and re-loaded with cut-down 35mm FP4 backed with the original paper. It lasts a long time, but if I needed to make any I'm sure it wouldn't be difficult to slice it down from 120 in a similar way to slicing the film. I use a pair of Stanley blades in a jig with a fat spacer and shims for fine adjustment. A hinged lid clamps everything in place and two guides keep the film straight as it's drawn through.

    The main thing is to have fun!

    Best wishes,

    Steve
     
  16. cmo

    cmo Member

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    The value of my Pentax auto 110 cameras and lenses just skyrocketed :smile:

    Though I am not exactly a fan of that Lomography hipster stuff I ordered a few films...

    Does someone know what sort of film is actually inside?


    Hope that Adox finally starts the 110 cartridge machines, too.
     
  17. Joe VanCleave

    Joe VanCleave Member

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    Well...you'd have to disassemble the film cartridges and re-wrap the film in the backing paper, then reassemble the cartridges properly (all in the dark), in order for it to be an effective light-trap. Probably more trouble than just unloading in the dark.

    More to the point, does anyone have a source for C-41 processing of 110 film? I have a few rolls needing processing. Perhaps Dwayne's in Kansas City?

    ~Joe
     
  18. phirehouse

    phirehouse Subscriber

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    Dwayne's processed mine:smile:
     
  19. brianmquinn

    brianmquinn Member

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  20. cmo

    cmo Member

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    I sent them an email asking for dev times... that will shed some light on this film, hopefully not too much :cool:
     
  21. nexus757

    nexus757 Member

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    Eh...whoever makes the film it would be hard to go too wrong with 7 min. at 68F in D-76. Glad I still have some stainless steel 110 reels.
     
  22. cmo

    cmo Member

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  23. brianmquinn

    brianmquinn Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 23, 2012
  24. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    Now, if only they provided film for Minolta 16mm cameras...
     
  25. cmo

    cmo Member

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    What kind of film do they need? Other perforation?
     
  26. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    Just received my Lomographic Orca 110 film. The box clearly says "Made in China", so that answers one of my questions. Still not sure what it is. As brianmquinn points out, the times are an exact copy of that from the Massive Developing Chart for Orwo UN54. Even in the same order. Could it be some Chinese factory buys Orwo film, perforates it for 110, and loads it into 110 cassettes?
    Also interesting is that both the box and the sticker on the cassette proudly says "1st Production Run". What is not included is an expiration date. Not that it matters to me as I keep all my film stock in the freezer so I don't care what the date is.
    I put a cassette in my Minolta Weathermatic 110, and will be shooting it in the coming days. It will be interesting to see the results.