NEW TO 4/5 FORMAT

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by STEVEP51, Jan 16, 2013.

  1. STEVEP51

    STEVEP51 Member

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    HI GUYS ive just got a4/5 wista camera im new to 4/5format can any one tell me how to use it.it has a150mm lens .the camera is wood and brass and folds iuse i use a mamiya rz67 at moment i may of jumped in at the deep end but i just want to learn i no about the front and rear standards i just want to no what to do after setting the standards.menythanks
     
  2. Pfiltz

    Pfiltz Member

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    Steve, I'm new to 4x5 and camera movements. I started out by watching some YouTube vids on large format cameras and photography. I then loaded up some film, and started to take images. I basically looked through the ground glass and adjusted the movements, until I liked what I saw through the glass. Then took the shot.

    Hope this helps somewhat.
     
  3. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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  4. STEVEP51

    STEVEP51 Member

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    THANK YOU pfilz your words of wisdom have helped me,so getting every thing in focus on back glass is key objectiv sounds easy???
     
  5. Bruce Osgood

    Bruce Osgood Membership Council Council

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    The Large Format Photography site that Brian mentions has everything you need to know to get started. You really can't pick what you want to know and think you're getting off on the right foot. Every aspect is contingent upon others. It's all interwoven and will make sense when practiced.
     
  6. STEVEP51

    STEVEP51 Member

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    thanks brian for web site ,printed every thing off thanks again stevep51
     
  7. STEVEP51

    STEVEP51 Member

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    bruce love the sharpness off the photos,thanks for info stevep ps keep up the lovely photos
     
  8. thegman

    thegman Member

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    I just saw the wood/brass Wista in a shop in London, absolutely beautiful camera.

    I'm something of an armchair 4x5 shooter, i.e. I don't shoot large format at the moment, but I like to read about it. I find a lot of the Youtube videos helpful, and also, I'd get a cheap loupe to make sure you're in focus. I use one on a 6x9 camera with ground glass, and it's pretty helpful.
     
  9. Pfiltz

    Pfiltz Member

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    Yeah, Steve... I don't do well reading. I'm more of a hands on person. Just pretty much how I even started my studio. Bought lights, camera, and went for it. Same goes for my brief film exposure. I just put a hood over my head, and looked and adjusted until I liked what I wanted. Then metered for the right lighting, and pop off the shot.

    Just me though. Your mileage may vary.
     
  10. mark

    mark Member

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    Welcome to the slippery slope. Just imagine how cool an 8x10 would be. :tongue:

    The best thing I did when learning was to put the camera on the tripod and play. No film just play with movements.
     
  11. Alan Gales

    Alan Gales Subscriber

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    Mark is right. Just playing with your camera will teach you a lot.

    If you go to YouTube and type in 4x5 photography there are a lot of home made videos about 4x5 photography. It's nice to have video to help bring the printed material alive.
     
  12. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Yes, this is good advice. Set some things on a tabletop, place the camera so it's pointed down at about a 30 degree angle and just move the things around, focussing and using movements on different arrangements. Do the same thing outside with buildings, using the movements to control perspective (back) and plane of focus (front).

    Two items you will find invaluable are a good darkcloth and a good focussing loupe.

    N.B. An 8x10 has 4 times the area of a 4x5 so the groundglass is correspondingly easier to view the subject on.:wink:
     
  13. goldenimage

    goldenimage Subscriber

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    whats fun is trying to get everything in focus from near to far, tilt the back a bit, tilt the front a bit, stop the lens down. bammm you got it. where sometimes there is a bit more to it than that, depends on what you are shooting :munch:, but the challenge is fun
     
  14. STEVEP51

    STEVEP51 Member

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    THANK YOU GUYS for all the good info,this why i love this site. stevep51
     
  15. snay1345

    snay1345 Member

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    There is a good video on youtube that shows the Scheimpflug theory and he goes through the steps while using a cereal box as an example. It is a good video to give you an idea on how to get what you want in focus. Just go to youtube and do a search for Scheimpflug and it will pop up.