New to GG metering

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Changeling1, Jun 5, 2006.

  1. Changeling1

    Changeling1 Member

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    Has anyone used a Minolta Booster 2 attachment for ground glass focusing? Any suggestions or advice is welcome.I also need to obtain a Minolta meter to use with this item so what should I be looking for?

    I'm also planning to try "behind–the-lens" filtering for a change. Wouldn't GG focusing be ideal using this filter system? I presume there would be no need for bellows extension compensation and filter factors when using GG metering.

    I've been curious about this type of metering for many years and
    eBay and the "D" revolution has made obtaining the above "tools" inexpensive and convenient! :wink:



    Thanks in advance for your insight.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 6, 2006
  2. Sparky

    Sparky Member

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    I've looked into it. I think that behind-the-lens filtering is an EXCELLENT idea for EXACTLY the same reasons that ground glass metering is a simply AWFUL idea, except, possibly, under VERY controlled conditions. We're talking about stray light here. The 'in front of the ground glass' probe solutions are somewhat better... but still problematic I would think.

    J
     
  3. roteague

    roteague Member

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    I've got one, but haven't used it lately. The idea is good, but you need to shade the groundglass while using it.
     
  4. Capocheny

    Capocheny Member

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    I'd think it would be far more convenient to use a metering probe rather than the ground glass unit.

    If you've not seen the Sinar probe and metering back... do yourself a favor and look into that possibility too. And, if your camera doesn't have the capability to accept a metering back... then Sinar use to have a cassette that inserts into the film back just like a regular filmholder. Then, you'd slip the probe into the cassette holder to take the reading...

    And, the best thing is... it takes into account the filter and bellows factors if required.

    Cheers
     
  5. roteague

    roteague Member

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    His unit doesn't have a probe. The Minolta Booster 2, which I have as well, is an attachment for Minolta Flash III meter, that is used by pointing it at the subject through the groundglass. It has an adjustment wheel that you use to compensate for the groundglass itself.
     
  6. Capocheny

    Capocheny Member

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    Hi Rob,

    Yes, I realize that he doesn't have the probe that I mentioned. My posting essentially suggested the use of a probe as being more convenient than the Booster 2, which I also had at one time. :smile:

    Personally, the Sinar probe arrangement is more convenient to use partly because you don't really need to worry about stray light affecting the exposure reading. When using the cassette... once you position the probe and are ready to take the reading, the insert covers off the groundglass. Voila... you're good to go! :smile:

    Cheers
     
  7. Changeling1

    Changeling1 Member

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    Thanks everyone for the information

    Here's a picture of the Booster 11 and its dial. I wonder how difficult it would be to use this set - up under a darkcloth? I guess I'll find out :smile:
     

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  8. Capocheny

    Capocheny Member

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    Just make sure you do the calibration that's required... check your instructions. And, as Rob stated... make sure your ground glass is well shaded to avoid any errant readings.

    Have fun and let us know how things turn out. :smile:

    Cheers