Newbie: Exposed, now I need to dev it...

Discussion in 'Contact Printing' started by buze, Sep 23, 2006.

  1. buze

    buze Member

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    Ok. I got some 8x10 paper, 2 nice panes of glass, a 15W bulb and 4 4x5 negs.

    I made my sandwitch in the dark, because I have no safe lights.

    I exposed using a "dark slide" approach. I masked 2/3 of the plate, exposed for 10 seconds, moved the slide 1/3 and exposed another 10s, then removed the slide and exposed another 10s

    Now, the print is in the Paterson Orbital, and I need to prepare the Multigrade Paper developer! I already have the stop & fix I use for film...

    Any suggestion on development time ? Fix ? Are the temperature as important as for film or can I do it in ambiant (20+) ?

    Oh, speaking of the paterson, can I put several 8x10 in there or is it "one shot" only ?
    What about the multigrade solution, can I reuse it?

    Told ya I was a newbie ! :D
     
  2. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    Depends on the developer for almost all those questions-)

    Prints are done to compeletion. So what ever time the developer claims to use is what you should use.

    Who makes this developer? Odds are they have some sort of document listing how many sheets it'll do per litre. How long to develop.

    You really should use separate batches of fixer for paper and film.
     
  3. buze

    buze Member

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    It's Multigrade Ilford, on Multigrade paper.. I found the document on how to use it (2 minutes at 20C) and developped the print...
    But it turned all black.... I tought 10 seconds would be fine as a minimum!

    The 15W bulb was about 30-40cm over the plates.

    I have not a single clue as to what to use as a starter time, maybe I'll try another one later witn 1 seconds, 2 and 4 seconds... I suspect that if it's all black at 10 seconds it but be reduced by at least half to even see anything ...?
     
  4. Bob F.

    Bob F. Member

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    Don't waste a full sheet each test. Cover 3/4 of the sheet with something opaque (black card, magazine, whatever) and expose for 4 seconds. Uncover another 1/4 to show 1/2 of the sheet and expose for 2 seconds. Uncover more so only 1/4 is still covered and expose for 1 second. Uncover the rest and expose for 1 second. You now have 4 areas exposed for 1,2,4 and 8 seconds (i.e. 1 stop apart). This should get you close - more tests around the best time will get you closer still. Obviously, do not move the paper or the negative during this. You may need to use less light to get a sensible exposure time (say 10 - 30 seconds) - that will give you time to dodge/burn if required.

    Safelight: an LED based rear bicycle lamp will do the job nicely - I saw a set of LED lights in a Pound Shop...

    Have fun, Bob.
     
  5. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    You're too close for that powerfull a bulb.

    Think of it this way. An enlarger with a 75 watt bulb might be used at F/8. F/8 cuts the light down 7 stops or 128 times. Even so you'd be higher up then 30 cm. Move the bulb up to 60 cm.
     
  6. buze

    buze Member

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    Ok, I was slightly off the mark originaly ! :D I put the lamp on a 40cm box, and the correct time is 1.5s

    But now they look great, how exciting ! :D
     
  7. Nige

    Nige Subscriber

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    isn't it!

    I'd move the lamp back further to increase the time more. Less error likely with longer time.
     
  8. buze

    buze Member

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    Yes I'm going to try that next. I hadn't realised the paper was so sensitive ! I'll move the bulb as far as I can in the bathroom, but it won't be overhead any longer... Does the light angle affect the exposure significantly ?
     
  9. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    You want to keep the light centered over the print. Dimming the light will play hell with the contrast of your multigrade paper. (like filters, later you may want to experiment) best way to slow it down at this point is to add some diffusion or density between the light and the negative. You might try a sheet of bond on top of the glass(check that there are no watermarks, if the glass is thick enough, and the bond fine enough it will illuminate evenly.), or milky plexi (thats what I use). This may soften things ever so slightly. ND or diffusion gel somewhere between the lightsource and your frame is another option.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 24, 2006
  10. buze

    buze Member

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    What about placing a sheet of A4 330g white paper on top of the glass? it should absorb some of the light, and diffuse it a little ?
    2 sheets ? :D

    thanks for all the help and suggestion so far !
     
  11. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Yes that might work, but carefully inspect the resultant print for evidence of the paper fiber. Milk plex works the best for me.
     
  12. buze

    buze Member

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    Ok I tried the paper, but it did have some texture and diffracted the light a bit. In the end I just moved the light (at a slight angle) further off, and I now I reach a 8 second delay for a good exposure, and that is a LOT more manageable. I won't dodge and burn, but I can control the exposure a little depending on the neg and I don't have to be 1/3s precise in my timing :D

    Thanks for all the help guys !