Newcomer to Infrared Film

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by la_photographic, Oct 7, 2010.

  1. la_photographic

    la_photographic Member

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    I am about to start taking photographs using Infrared Film and Filter using a Manual SLR Camera.

    I want to know technical information for taking infrared photographs including what aperture & shutter speeds you need to use in all lighting conditions (including late evening & night time).

    Can you use a flash as the flash for my camera only works at 1/60th second?
     
  2. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

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    Welcome to APUG!

    IR isn't really an "alternative process", but in the B&W film section there have been three recent threads about IR.
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/74652-rollei-ir-400-rodinal.html
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/81314-efke-ir820-subdued-light.html
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/78808-efke-4x5-infrared-820-aura-film-first-try.html

    Using an SLR means you have to keep popping the filter off to compose and focus (I recently realized as I ran a few rolls through my Bronica). Of course, the only available stuff is slow enough you'll want a tripod anyway.

    Anyhow, cruise those threads and see if you have more questions. It's one of those areas where you have to experiment, because neither eyes nor meters share the same spectral range as the film.

    DaveT
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 7, 2010
  3. M.A.Longmore

    M.A.Longmore Subscriber

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    Welcome To APUG !


    Ron
    .
     
  4. mooseontheloose

    mooseontheloose Subscriber

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    To begin with, which infrared film are you using? What filter will you be using? Your question is far to open-ended for anyone to give you a meaningful answer without more information.

    Generally speaking, the sun is your best source of infrared light -- which means when the sun is shining you have many things reflecting infrared light, and when it's not...well, not so much. It's possible to shoot in foggy or cloudy conditions but your exposures will be longer and the results will be more unpredictable and not necessarily what you think it will be. At night, the sun isn't shining (!) so there's no infrared light being reflected. There are other sources of infrared light (tungsten light bulbs, fire, etc), and you can make your own by putting an infrared filter over your flash (in which case you wouldn't need a filter on your lens)...but if you are just beginning I would recommend just starting simply and shoot objects in daylight (and keep track of your settings for each exposure) to see what works and what doesn't. There's a lot of information on the web that you should research first. Here are a couple of sites: one, two.

    Also, welcome to APUG!
     
  5. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    One thing to keep in mind as you look into IR film is that IR film is sensitive to near infrared or light just below what our eyes can see. Many get IR confused with heat, which would be called far infrared. Heat much farther down the spectrum and will not expose IR film.

    It would behoove you get to know some light sources and what kind of light they produce. This will help you understand how IR film is exposed.

    Best of luck
     
  6. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Also depends what part of the world you're in. Winter time is usually not as good for IR film.

    Jeff
     
  7. la_photographic

    la_photographic Member

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    More info

    Thank you for your replies.

    I will be using the Rollei Infrared 400 film and my filter is the Hoya R72 filter.

    I was asking about evening photography as in a couple of weeks time I will be going on a ghost walk which starts at about 7.30pm & it is starting to get dark around that time.
     
  8. la_photographic

    la_photographic Member

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    Am in the UK and it will still be October I will be using the film.
     
  9. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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  10. mooseontheloose

    mooseontheloose Subscriber

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    Is this a tour? Will you be part of a group?

    I've never shot infrared at night so I can't really help you there, but I would definitely recommend shooting a test roll at night, around the same time frame, of lit (!) buildings or whatever else you plan to shoot beforehand (I imagine you won't need a filter -- there should be no need to block other spectrums of light at night since most of your sources should (hopefully!) have infrared light).
     
  11. mooseontheloose

    mooseontheloose Subscriber

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    Not necessarily...it depends what you want to shoot. I like the treatment that infrared film gives old wood. There's an image in my gallery of a farmhouse shot in the middle of a Canadian winter (on HIE).

    (edit: I seem to have a problem placing a photo in this post)
     
  12. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

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    Even at night, especially if using flash (unless it's IR filtered), I think you will still want a filter if you want IR effects, otherwise you may as well use regular pan film at considerably less cost. But maybe IR effects aren't the goal -- is the intent to surreptitiously take pictures -- IR filter over the flash? Even then it won't be totally invisible. Note also that the current flavors of IR film will need approximately 6 stops of exposure beyond a metered reading, the stuff will be somewhat limited for any scene with action -- unless you use a pretty heavy flash.
     
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  13. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I have to remember that.

    Jeff
     
  14. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    I would disagree (politely) with this statement. If the sun is at a lower angle, the IR component of visible light is actually greater due to UV filtration through the atmosphere.

    I would also state that some of the best IR shots i have seen are taken during winter as the snow reflects IR well.

    If there is a drawback, most deciduous trees have shed their leaves, but this is merely a change of aesthetic.

    Respectfully,
     
  15. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I stand corrected, I geuss I never thought about that much!

    Jeff
     
  16. la_photographic

    la_photographic Member

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    Yes it is a walking tour and I will be part of a group.

    I will try out a film first beforehand - thanks.