night vision goggles

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by rmolson, May 28, 2009.

  1. rmolson

    rmolson Member

    Messages:
    306
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    Location:
    Mansfield Oh
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Night Vision goggles


    After 50+ years of loading film onto 35mm reels Paterson or stainless you would think you should be able to do it in your sleep….but nooooo! Anytime you think you got it made, the photography gods will teach you a little humility! And that started me thinking Night vision goggles really just amplify existing light. . I wonder if a weak green safelight would work with them? I ask because I see Amazon . has them for $80 granted they are a toy but apparently work. Question is do they emit any visible light themselves that would fog film?
     
  2. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,129
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Location:
    Two inches to the left
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    Best way to find out would be to burn a roll and try it. But I have a sneaking suspicion what the results would be.
     
  3. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

    Messages:
    5,458
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
    Location:
    North East U.S.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    There is an article in the recent View Camera Magazine about using the toy night vision goggles. It's fairly positive about them, and says you can even use them to develop by inspection. They emit IR, as I recall.
    They look pretty ungainly to wear though.
    For me, I think I'll stick to seeing with my hands, but they would make some things easier, I suppose.
     
  4. rmann

    rmann Subscriber

    Messages:
    297
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    They will work just fine using IR - there have been a number of threads recently about this - search here and also on the large format forum. There was also an article recently in View Camera magazine about the "toy" goggles and how to use them.
     
  5. sun of sand

    sun of sand Member

    Messages:
    602
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    They work just fine. For closer work you'll want to add a +1-4 diopter or adjust focus by breaking into the goggles
    I go diopter. They wont fog anything being IR light. Nothing visible. Not light amplification. The optional red led is very dim but not worth using anyway
    For cutting paper, film, loading film, developing film they're quite the neat toy

    If going to spend $80 might as well spend $150 or 200 and get a better unit, IMO
    I bought used off ebay for under $40 shipped
    Work fine but if ever want to upgrade ..doubt I'd bother ..I'll only be in the hole $40 or few dollars if resell
    but brand new and you're out $80 or $40 if resell
    Going cheap go cheap.

    When you try the eyeclops goggles -if you go used eyeclops- you'll realize that the majority of kids that are selling them are doing so because they just aren't all that much "fun"
    They're relatively fun if you're stationary or walking in wide open spaces.. I was very active and these things would have been tossed for being practically useless
     
  6. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

    Messages:
    1,749
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    Tufts Univer
    Shooter:
    35mm
    You can use infrared goggles. The film is not sensitive to infrared unless you're using infrared film. They're used in the processing of Kodachrome and E6 emulsions. It's an easy way to monitor the process and probably develop by inspection.
     
  7. resummerfield

    resummerfield Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,363
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Location:
    Alaska
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    An IR system needs 2 components: the IR goggles to convert IR light into visible light for our eyes, and an IR light source. Normally IR goggles (or monoculars) have the IR light source attached to the goggles. I tried this setup, but it was like looking down a black hole.

    So I constructed a different IR light source by taking a standard Kodak "beehive" safelight with a 7-1/2w bulb, and putting an infrared filter (I think it was an 87C) in a cardboard holder in place of a safelight filter. Then I aimed this at a white wall.

    This setup bathes the entire darkroom with a soft light that has never fogged any film. It is so bright, that I was able to install a lens cap with a small hole over my IR monocular, which results in increased depth of field and resolution.

    Using this setup, my darkroom is as "bright" and easy to navigate as it is with a Thomas safelight. Perfect for loading film holders.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 28, 2009
  8. amuderick

    amuderick Member

    Messages:
    283
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2007
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I have a cheap setup which I am now testing. I bought a bunch of 940nm LEDs and wired them up on a breadboard. I put it in my changing tent. Also in the changing tent is a Sony camcorder that supports NightShot (i.e. it removes the IR filter to allow maximum IR through). Out one of the armholes, in addition to my arm, is a cable from the camcorder that connects to the television. So, basically, I can watch my hands inside the bag on the TV. I don't have a darkroom since I don't have any space for one and I don't develop my own prints except using alternative processes. Just remember to tape over the "red light" with electrical tape and also the viewfinder so that no visible light is emitted in the tent.

    I can load and unload film pretty easily without this setup. However, I am trying to use a film slitter to cut 120 film down to 110 size and I found it very difficult to handle blind. I also have a Polaroid project I'm working on and this setup should come in handy.

    Basically, if you have a changing tent and a camcorder, you only need spend ~$20 for the LEDs and you are good to go.

    Keep in mind that most IR flashlights and IR leds are 850nm and they bleed enough energy into the red part of the spectrum to ruin film. You need 940nm LEDs.
     
  9. 77seriesiii

    77seriesiii Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    having used military versions to drive, fly and romp through forests, they are a hoot. HOWEVER, if there is no ambient light they will not amplify anything. These things work by amplifying available light, lots of mirrors and magic smoke. If they do not have a seal on the face expect a green/blue glow at the end near the eyes. I've never tested them with film but I guess it is a combination of how bright the emitters (near the eye) and how sensitive the film is to light in that spectrum. Also, if there is no available light it was common for the military ground versions to have an IR spectrum emitter, knew guys that would use the IR light to read maps with. On the emission side of the tube the light here can be quite bright and it is possible to see the green light from 50m away in a forest setting if no eyecups are used. we used to used blue/green filter combinations to 'create' an NVG safe flashlight. This is a flashlight that you can use to light the way but is not visible to NVG devices. Not sure how this would work in a darkroom. Essentially, this filter combinations are the same spectrum of the light emitted from the tube. All of these toys, including filters, can be found at any number of military sales stores, Ranger Joes, etc.

    ./e
     
  10. Aurum

    Aurum Member

    Messages:
    923
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Location:
    Landrover Ce
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Silence of the lambs anyone?