Nikon F2 with series E lenses

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by FM2N, Mar 6, 2012.

  1. FM2N

    FM2N Member

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    Hello All,
    Wondering how to use the series E lenses with my F2 since the lens does not come with the rabbit ears? Do I push the meter pin up and out of way then the window says 5.6 what do I set the lens at? Do I set the lens at 5.6, meter the object then readjust the shutter speed and f/stop for what I want to shot at then fire away?
    Thanks for help
    Arthur
     
  2. dehk

    dehk Member

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    After a little research, I think It depends on the prism you have I believe.

    If you have a "Photomic A Finder (DP11) and AS (DP12)" , the metering will work on your series E (Which is AI coupled) lens.

    I think DP1 - 2 and 3 will only work with NAI - Bunny Ears.

    Source - http://www.cameraquest.com/ff2finde.htm



    Worst case (or best case) scenario, time to learn how to shoot without the meter.
     
  3. LunoLuno

    LunoLuno Member

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    Arthur, you don't have to stick to 5.6. You can freely select any aperture. Earlier Photomic finders work with series E lenses with the "Stop down metering method". You need to press the preview button while metering.

    Luno
     
  4. Aja B

    Aja B Member

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    Presumably you have one of the following prisms: DP-1 (F2 Photomic), DP-2 (F2S) or DP-3 (F2SB). You're relegated to using stop-down metering. Before mounting the lens push the Meter Coupling Pin, as you suggested, up and out of the way until you see '5.6' in the Max Aperture Window on the prism. It's critical that 5.6 appear in order to obtain accurate meter-readings. Now you can mount your lens and meter via stop-down method at any aperture setting you desire.
     
  5. John_Nikon_F

    John_Nikon_F Subscriber

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    What everyone else has said. If your Nikkors are AI'd, AI, or AIS, however, save up and get yourself either a DP-11 or DP-12 finder. If your camera has the DP-1, the DP-11 will be very familiar to you, except for the fact that you can see the aperture in the viewfinder, and you don't have to do the "Nikon Shuffle". The DP-12 is nice in that it has a very familiar meter readout compared to the camera that's your username.

    -J
     
  6. LJSLATER

    LJSLATER Member

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    Not really on topic, but for years my only camera was a broken F4 that didn't couple to the lens' aperture, which meant I had to use stop-down metering all the time, even with post-AI lenses. Eventually, I got a soda straw and jammed it in the depth-of-field button so I had permanent depth-of-field preview! After a while, I really started to like it, and it was hard when the F4 finally broke and I went back to a camera that had functioning automatic diaphram coupling. I'd probably love a 50's era SLR without an instant-return mirror or automatic diaphram operation.

    I guess my point is that stop-down metering isn't so bad.
     
  7. FM2N

    FM2N Member

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    If I kept the lens at 5.6 as well as the DP-1 finder and just metered at 5.6 would I have to "stop Down" meter or is the exposure given at 5.6 accurate?
    Thanks for all the help.
     
  8. John_Nikon_F

    John_Nikon_F Subscriber

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    Yes, you would. Meter would be metering at f/1.8, since the lens would be wide open. When you press upward on the pin, the meter uncouples itself and starts responding to light and shutter speed inputs only. So, you'd have to manually move the linkage to f/32 and back to f/1.8. Then, with the pin centered, the meter would think the lens was set to f/5.6.

    If you can find a junker lens with a prong, get some epoxy and glue the prong onto the lens. Then, it'll work on non-AI bodies as well as later bodies. The mod can be reversed, simply by prying off the prong, and cleaning the residual glue off the ring.

    -J
     
  9. Aja B

    Aja B Member

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    Arthur, my friend, it would take you 1.5 seconds for you to answer your own question with your camera in your hands. Have you tested your hypothesis by doing as I described above? Rather than offering a one-word answer I think the greater lesson is in understanding the mechanics. Besides, anyone shooting an F2 most certainly has an appreciation for precision-made, mechanically-controlled sophistication that is, in fact, the supreme essence of the F2 and therefore, cannot help but be consumed with wanting to understand such sophistication.:wink: Or perhaps not.

    Observe what occurs the moment you mount your the lens; the aperture is wide open regardless of the aperture-ring setting. Change your aperture ring to f1.4, 11 or 22 and the aperture remains wide-open. Conversely, the meter-reading remains unchanged because the aperture opening remains unchanged. The meter continues to read at wide-open. The meter hasn't the foggiest notion of what your aperture is set to because the aperture ring is not linked in any way to the prism's meter. The only time you would not have to depress the DOF preview button to utilize stop-down metering is when your aperture ring is set to 'wide-open'. Enjoy that F2 of yours!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 7, 2012
  10. FM2N

    FM2N Member

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    Thanks I now understand. Do I have to hold the the DOF button Down until I release the shutter or only to meter then let it go and take the shot? I will check to see if I can take the ears off another lens.
    I appreciate all the help.
    Aja yes you are right. I had noticed that the lens is wide open when mounted. I just thought that the DP head being set at 5.6 had something to do with the lens.
    Arthur
     
  11. Aja B

    Aja B Member

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    You can do either since it doesn't matter. Most people would remove their finger from the DOF button, perhaps to refine their composition, have a bright finder while composing, etc. but it's not necessary to remove your finger. Keep in mind when one uses the 'mirror lock-up' feature the DOF button is also engaged and stops-down the lens to the shooting aperture.
     
  12. CGW

    CGW Member

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    E series lack the tiny pilot holes flanking f/5.6 that allowed the prongs to be retrofitted to AF/AFD lenses. Epoxy isn't really workable. Stop down metering is really a no-brainer, so don't sweat it.
     
  13. John_Nikon_F

    John_Nikon_F Subscriber

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    ^ Epoxy works quite well. I've had a couple AF Nikkors that were done with epoxy glue. Worked fine on Nikkormats, F's with FTn finders, and non-AI F2's. Also received a Series E 50/1.8 that had been so modified. Coupled with all non-AI bodies, but, since I didn't plan to keep the lens, I removed the prong and cleaned the ring up for resale purposes. The tiny pilot holes on most AF Nikkors are in the wrong places anyway, as I discovered when I fitted a 75-300 Nikkor with a prong.

    With respect to holding down the DOF preview - that's only necessary with a camera that has aperture-priority automatic modes and is being used in said mode, like an EL2, FE, F3, or F4.

    -J
     
  14. CGW

    CGW Member

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    Wouldn't get epoxy close to any lens of mine. Just too many NAI, Ai and AIS Nikkors with prongs around to bother with this dodgy fix. Funny but Nikon.ca techs seemed to think those pilot holes were properly located when they put prongs on some AFD lenses.