Nikon F5 vs. Canon Eos 1n

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by funkpilz, Dec 12, 2008.

  1. funkpilz

    funkpilz Member

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    I'm sorry if this has been posted before, I couldn't find a similar thread with the search engine.

    I want to get into auto focus film SLRs, and I have two cameras in mind. Both the F5 and the 1n seem to have quite a large fan base, but I've never used either, so I'm confused. Can anyone tell me something about each model's advantages over the other? Are there any killer features that I might benefit from?

    Some info on my photography, if it helps: I like shooting Portraits and I want to do a lot of low light stuff. I want a camera that is very easy to use and has a very wide range of shutter speeds (give me that half minute exposure!), and an advanced metering chip would be nice as well.

    Thanks for any help!
     
  2. Ken N

    Ken N Member

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    Both are actually extremely good cameras and part of exceptional systems. Pick one based on other factors like how it feels in your hand or the availability of the lenses you want to use. Seriously, you can't go wrong with either one as they both are top dogs.
     
  3. ron110n

    ron110n Member

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    I have a Nikon F5, but I think low light stuff like night club utilizing available light belong to the Rangefinder world that don't have a mirror that slap. It can be done with an SLR and why not. But you will have to push your ISO or use a monopod. The Nikkor VR AF (Vibration Reduction) lenses... I believe that belongs to the digital world, cause I don't see any advantage on film. Plus you have no control and tons of f stop limitations on VR lenses. Once the lens CPU says no to your SLR body, your F5 "won't shoot". I learned that the hard way by owning one. But works well on my D300.
     
  4. André E.C.

    André E.C. Member

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    What optics do you have?

    If Nikkors go for the F5, if you own Canons, shoot on the 1N, simple.:smile:



    Cheers



    André
     
  5. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    The flagship of the EOS fleet and replacement for the blighty EOS 1, the much more refined EOS 1N was introduced in 1994 and discontinued in September 2001, quickly finding a solid favouring by the press and documentary photographers for its speed and robustness.

    The 1N's rounded profile and sealed push button controls (with early optional heavy-duty weatherproofing over-seals) was favoured by photojournalists and even bushwalkers/mountaineers working in extreme environments. Photographers with small hands found the EOS 1N without the power drive booster E1 (8x AA batteries) fitted delightfully to hand, making it terrific for streetwise photography. It has the option of using a 2CR5 battery or for high levels of sustained speed and power the optional power drive booster [PDBE-1] — the fixed-mirror 1N RS has this booster permanently attached which gives that model a thumping 10 frames per second top speed, letting you burn a roll of 'Vaudeville Velvia' in about 3 seconds). Many analogists (myself among) power the PDBE1 with lithium batteries. I've shot 340 rolls and the batteries are still in there.

    The 1N in good to very good condition can be bought for around AUD$500 body only, or about $700 with PDBE1: you do need to watch how older cameras have been treated. I bought mine off eBay after probity checks and scrutinising the seller thoroughly about condition. Of course, the 1N can withstand quite a banging in active service, but after so long, quite a few of the bodies would be showing heavy wear. Bent internal electronic contacts, damaged top panel display or scratched lengs and even marked mirrors are a common symptom of heavy pro use, ordinarily knocked about willy-nilly in bags, back seats and backpacks without body caps. The interchangeable Command Back E1 with intervalometer, frame numbering etc. is quite rare now.

    The longer I've owned my bodies the more appreciative I have become for easily coping with heat, cold dust, dirt and the plain curious (i.e. the Customs Officer who wanted the lens removed to check if narcotics were stashed under the mirror!! :mad: ),

    The 1N does have ideosyncracies. The "two-fingered hokey-pokey" for setting custom functions in a side 'trapdoor' is a bit tedious when you're in a hurry or working in the dark and require a thorough familiarisation to ensure you don't inadvertently set the self-timer up for 2 seconds when you're about to photograph bub seeing the first light of day! Minor quibbles aside I'd buy another to join the two I already have, if only I could justify the weight! :tongue:

    Some other curious facts:
    • The 1N consumes virtually no power over extended Bulb exposures
    • 2CR5 batteries last much longer in the 1N than, for instance, the EOS 5
    • Being a system camera, otherwise awkward EOS lenses such as the sharp-edged TS-E PC lenses,
    will not damage the body like they can on the EOS 5 and other models.
    • Power Drive Boosters with the AEL button marked with an asterisk ( * ) can use lithium batteries. Those not so marked will be damaged.

    At the end of the day, you'll probably form a noticeably definite affinity with one system over another by interchanging the systems frequently — even if that means buying into and out of a system, until you settle with one you really, really like (this is what I did, from 1979 to 1992 when I finally settled on Canon, having worked through Olympus, Pentax, Minolta, Nikon and finally... ).

    I will not say "don't consider anything else". The era of these beautiful flagship cameras from all marques has been consigned to a niche in history. Nikon's F4, F5 ... maybe even the F90x are also worth evaluating. For me, the F401 in 1991 didn't go down well at all. :mad:

    More info on EOS 1N: http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/eos/index.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 12, 2008
  6. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    I bought an eos-1n just because I liked the sound of shutter/film advance. I also wanted to switch to canon lenses. The 1n is more compact and may be lighter.
     
  7. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

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    I prefer the Nikon F100, after having owned 2 F5 bodies. The F100 is far lighter in weight. I have three.

    The Canon system is just as fine. If you have previous experience with the Canon system, I say stay with it.
     
  8. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Agreed.
     
  9. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    I think the F5 compares to the EOS 1V; it is beyond the 1 N.

    However, for all normal purposes the F100 is the standard: it does all anyone is likely to need,
    with no extra cost or size to do the things you won't need. Maybe it would compare more to the 1 N.

    The F100 focusses manual lenses very well, something the F5 & the 1v do not --- without replacing the standard screen, which is easy.

    I use an EOS 1v, for low light and flat light Portraiture, and love it. It is heavy, but it makes for a more stable camera hand held. I use it instead of a Hassie or RZ. An F5 is equally fine.

    Finally, I need the hot AF SLR today to do what I could easily do with a Nikon F 15 years ago, focus quickly and accurately in flat light... without glasses. No bad choices for you, are there ?
     
  10. funkpilz

    funkpilz Member

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    Well, this is indeed a difficult choice. My manual focus experience is all Canon, and a little Olympus. I wanted to give Nikon a try as well, especially since I've heard their AF is much faster and smarter than Canon's. The thing is, I love those Canon L lenses even though I can't dream to afford them. Does that mean Canon has better lenses overall? I'm so confused.
     
  11. André E.C.

    André E.C. Member

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    It's nice to have dreams:smile:, but hey, if you say you can't afford Canon L series optics, what makes you think you can afford top noch Nikkors? Nikon glass is even more expensive than Canon's.

    No, Canon doesn't have better lenses, they have high quality ones, exactly as Nikon.

    If you're a Canon user, stick with it, what's the reason to change?


    Cheers



    André
     
  12. Rol_Lei Nut

    Rol_Lei Nut Member

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    No, it means that Canon has the best marketing: Many photographers dream about owning those huge white lenses with starry eyes.

    The fact is, Canon lenses have a reputation for having bad bokeh (though also Nikon is guilty of that).
    Most Canon ultra-wide lenses are also not up to par (check out how many adapters are being sold to use other brand lenses on Canon cameras).

    My own advice for low-light shooting would be to use a rangefinder camera. It would also be much more discreet.
     
  13. funkpilz

    funkpilz Member

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    As to why I want to switch, it's mostly because I want to have an opinion on both manufacturers. I hate the whole Canon vs. Nikon fanboy war thing, but if people ask why I use either brand, I want to be able to give an informed answer.
    I don't really care for bokeh much, so unless Canon's is really ugly, that's not a factor for me. The quality of the lenses is, though. If there's one thing I hate, it's chromatic abberations. And I will spend quite a bit of money on lenses that don't have any (if that's even possible). Sharpness is also important to me.
    And yeah, there are about 5 rangefinders on my wishlist right now, but the AF pro camera is a priority.
     
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  15. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    The decision will be best made by considering lens systems. In general, bodies mean nothing without considering the entire system.

    If you shot with zooms, then it really doesn't matter which one you choose. You are stuck with f/2.8, and might as well pick your brand based on the body you like best, as lenses are basically identical.

    If you shoot with fixed-focal-length lenses, Canon has the better overall lens system due to its fast fixed-length lenses. Nikon has forgotten fixed lenses and has been focusing on zooms for years, while Canon still has a good selection for those who prefer to shoot with fixed-length lenses.
     
  16. bnstein

    bnstein Member

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    It may now be difficult in the era of non-analogue, but your best option will be to rent both on a weekend.

    A couple of further thoughts:
    1. Do you really need the wunder-electronics/AF: you have canon MF lenses which is an investment, why not consider the F1n which was Canons pro body in the MF era?
    2. You seem to have the $ for the body but not the lens: if you are going to buy an F5/eos1 and stick a bottom of the line zoom on it the cart is before the horse. Splash the cash on the lens and grab the minimum spec body that will make it play nice. Galen Rowell regularly used prosumer nikon bodies for their light weight when climbing, but didnt chisel on the lenses
    3. Why give a rodents rectum about the canikon flame-wars? They both deliver the goods. In pretty much every way its x does a better but y does b better. The reasons for choosing one over the other are 1. there really is a piece of kit only one system has or a function that is absolutely critical to you and outweighs everything else 2. you like one more than the other 3. they had ... in the shop.
    Lets face it in general a pro SLR is mostly limited by the person behind it more than its design and this has been for a good many years.
     
  17. cosm670

    cosm670 Member

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    Or since you have Canon manual focus equipment consider a T90. It's basically a FD mount EOS camera. You could then get some FD "L" series lenses which are much more affordable than their EOS counterparts.
     
  18. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    Usually I would advise staying with one manufacturer so you can swap the lenses around but in your case, the lenses from your manual focus cameras will not fit the eos series.

    The best advice would be to try them both to see which one you like the feel of. They are both very capable so the handling is more important and that would be a personal thing.

    I was under the impression that Canon had the edge on autofocus and Nikon on metering. This may or may not be true and would be marginal in any case.

    I enjoyed looking through your Flickr pages too.



    Steve.
     
  19. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

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    Well the F5 has interchangeable finders and screens, a color meter[which works well in all situations] and more durability[titanium finder]. It also has a metal rewind fork, and a option for manual rewind if you want to be quiet or your batteries are dead.
     
  20. Paul VanAudenhove

    Paul VanAudenhove Member

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    If you batteries are dead, you won't make it to the end of the roll....
    :tongue:
     
  21. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

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    Yeah, but if you need to get the film out [ex you need to develop it today] and the batteries die, it's useful.

    I've used the EOS 1n. It's a very nice pro camera, but I just prefer the F5.
     
  22. funkpilz

    funkpilz Member

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    I definitely want autofocus, so the MF Canons are out of the question. I'ved looked at the New F-1 and the T90, liked both, but decided to stay with my consumer bodies for manual focus. I want a pro body for fast AF and fancy metering, in general technologies that weren't around in the 70s/80s.
    I shoot with a mixture of primes and zooms, although I like primes better. The first lens I would be getting for an F5 would be the new AF-S 50mm f/1.4G. And no, I don't want to save any money on lenses. It's just that the price difference between good and not so good is way higher in lenses than it is in bodies. If I save 200 bucks on the body, that still won't get me an L lens. So, I might as well get a nice body to start with.
    I suppose in the end I'll just hold them both and decide by which one feels best. I just thought there might be some killer features or anything that has actual relevancy in a Canikon flame war :wink:
     
  23. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    Rubbish
     
  24. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    If there's one thing I hate, it's chromatic abberations

    You'll never see CA in a film camera. Never.
     
  25. Tim Gray

    Tim Gray Member

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    IF you go Canon, I'd look at either the 1V or the 3. I assume the 1n is significantly cheaper than the 1V, but the 1V is a much nicer camera. The 3 on the other hand is 95% of the camera that the 1V is, and you can probably get a nice one used for $250-300 (US).

    I have a 1V and it is simply an incredible camera.
     
  26. mudman

    mudman Member

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    and the 3 has ECF, which I absolutely loved when I had an Elan 7ne. However, I've switched to Nikon for the backwards compatability with MF lenses.