Nikon F50 - suggestions for B&W film and paper

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by andraz, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. andraz

    andraz Member

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    Hello everybody,
    I am new at this site and new to analog photography. So I am hoping you guys can help me.
    I have analog camera Nikon F50 and I want to take landscape/wildlife photography.
    So my question for you more experience photographers is this. Why and what kind of 35 mm film and paper should I use. Bare in mind that I am brand new at this so for start I would like to use B&W film that is easy to use and develop and the same goes for photo paper (resin-coated)-if you can recomend me the standard size and brand that is easy to work with.
    Thank you for your time and advices.
     
  2. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Welcome to APUG! Go with Tri-X or Ifrord HP5. As for paper look up Freestyle or B&H. Tri-X and HP5 are ISO 400.

    Jeff
     
  3. MDR

    MDR Member

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    Welcome

    For fine grain images Ilford Fp4+ or Kodak PXP both are 125 ASA, older style films and very forgiving great for Landscape less so for Wildlife Photography which usually requires high shutter speeds and long lenses in which case I'd opt for Ilford HP5+ or Tri-X. Ilford Multigrade RC 8x10 or Fomaspeed Variant III 8 x 10 are Multigrade papers and require Multigrade Filters but are otherwise good choices.

    Good luck

    Dominik
     
  4. Rol_Lei Nut

    Rol_Lei Nut Member

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    +1

    Alternatively, depending on where you are, you could try Efke (branded Adox in some places) for medium ad slow speed films (landscapes).
    Also, again depending on where you are for availability, Rollei and Maco films are good.

    Films like Fuji Neopan and Kodak T-Max, while good in their own right (and according to taste), tend to be unforgiving of errors and probably aren't a good starting point.
     
  5. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    It is really tough to get bad film from Kodak, Fuji, or Ilford.

    Pick something in the right speed a have fun.

    As to paper Adorama's house brand is quite nice.