Nikon Multiphot modification

Discussion in 'Macro Photography' started by Neil Grant, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. Neil Grant

    Neil Grant Member

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    The lower standard of the Multiphot has a fine focus that moves the bellows in and out through a cycle of about 6mm. This range is sometimes insufficient,
    especially if focus stacking techniques are employed. Has anybody built a new lower standard with improved focus range??
     
  2. dynachrome

    dynachrome Member

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    I sent this question to a friend who has most of the Multiphot system. The only official piece I have is a 12.0cm f/5.6 Macro Nikkor.
     
  3. dynachrome

    dynachrome Member

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    Here is an answer which may be helpful:

    The focus adjustment on the lower standard of the Multiphot is a "fine focus" mechanism. "Coarse" focus is achieved by movement of the specimen platform which is attached to the Multiphot's diascopic base rather than the bellows.

    Focus stacking is a software method of deconvolution of multiple views which gives a simulation of confocal imaging. The query is correct that if a specimen has so much depth that near and far focus points cannot be imaged with sharp focus via adjustment of the fine focus, the deconvolution will never be complete. In such a case, the SPECIMEN should be moved (as in the, long unavailable, Dynaphot system).

    The rack and pinion on which the Multiphot specimen stage rides is not likely to be fine enough for the use in question. The design parameters of the Multiphot diascopic base and specimen stage was largely for histologic sections so the fine focus of the objective lens is more than sufficient. A finer mechanism for specimen movement should be easily available and adaptable to the situation encountered by the originator of the query, if somewhat pricey.

    Howard J. Radzyner, FBCA
    Visualization & Communication
    for Medicine, Science, Law & Art
    510 East 23rd Street
    New York, NY 10010
    917-373-9257
    HRadzyner@Radzyner.com